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Publication numberUS2029152 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1936
Filing dateSep 22, 1934
Priority dateSep 22, 1934
Publication numberUS 2029152 A, US 2029152A, US-A-2029152, US2029152 A, US2029152A
InventorsBonkowski Teofil L
Original AssigneeBonkowski Teofil L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ink eradicating device
US 2029152 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

INK ERADICATING DEVICE Filed Sept. 22, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet l F/q3m INVENTOR 72027/ L fionkowski- ATTORNEY Jan. 28, 1936. 'r. L. BONKOWSKI 2,029,152

, INK ERADICATING DEVICE Filed Sept. 22, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fig.

-' INVENTOR 750197 4 Bon/rowsk/ ATTORNEY Patented Jan. 28, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,029,152 INK ERADICATING DEVICE Teofll L. Bonkowski, New York, N. Y. Application September 22, 1934, Serial No. 745,059

4 Claims.

The purpose of this invention is to provide a device by which fluids for removing ink, or the like, may readily be used and applied.

The invention is a small container having a reservoir with a valve resiliently held in the closed position and a dispensing plunger extending out of a tip of the device which opens the valve as the tip is applied.

Ink eradicators or fluids for removing ink are ordinarily supplied in bottles or other containers and, owing to the acids in the fluids these con- 'styles and for diiferent purposes, any of them are not adapted for ink eradicating fluids where it is necessary to discharge the fluid by drops and the drops should only be discharged as the tip of the device engages the surface of an object from which the ink is to removed.

The object of this invention is, therefore, to provide a device for containing and dispensing ink eradicating fluids which only discharges a comparatively small drop of the fluid as the tip engages the surface having the ink to be removed thereon.

Another object is to provide a dispensing device having a point extending thru and beyond a tip thereof in which the point operates a valve to release a substance in the device as it is pressed inward.

Another object is to provide a device for dispensing liquids having a valve member adapted to contain a drop of the fluid below the valve member.

Another object is to provide means in a dispensing device for ink eradicating fluids for readily refilling the device.

Another object is to provide non-metallic resilient means for holding the valve member.

A further object is to provide a device for dispensing liquids having air escaping means around the valve member.

A further object is to provide a liquid dispensing device which may be self-contained as an independent unit, or which may also be incorporated in a-fountain pen.

And a still further object is to provide a com paratively small device for dispensing ink eradicating fluids which is of a simple and economical construction.

With these ends in view the invention embodies a small casing having a reservoir in one end, a tip at the opposite end, a resiliently held valve between the reservoir and tip, and a plunger extending thru the tip for opening said valve.

Other features and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description taken in connection with the drawings, wherein:

Figure l is an outside view showing the device as it would appear in use.

Figure 2 is a cross section thru the device on an enlarged scale.

Figure 3 is a view showing the device incorporated in a fountain pen.

Figure 4 is a detail thru the plunger and valve on an enlarged scale showing the valve open.

Figure 5 is a cross section thru the device just above the upper edge of the plunger showing the grooves in the outer walls and also the shape of the upper edge of the plunger.

Figure 6 is a cross section thru the plunger showing grooves in the opposite edges thereof.

Figure '7 is a similar section showing an opening in the center of the plunger.

Figure 8 is a similar section showing a double opening thru the plunger.

Figure 9 is a view similar to that shown in Figure 2 showing an alternate design in which a fountain pen flller is incorporated in the casing for readily refilling the device.

Figure 10 is a similar view with parts omitted showing an alternate method of operating the filler.

Figure 11 is also a similar view with parts omitted, showing a filler of the compression type. Figure 12 is a cross section thru the lower part of the device showing an alternate arrangement of the plunger head and valve.

Figure 13 is a similar view showing another alternate arrangement in which the spring is replaced by a rubber member.

Figure 14 is a section thru a portion of the device showing a combination flller as it may be used with a fountain pen in which part of the filler fllls the'pen and the other part the sack of the ink eradicating device.

In the drawings the device is shown as it may be made wherein numeral 1 indicates the upper part of the casing or cap in which the reservoir is formed, numeral 2 the intermediate section, and numeral 3 the tip.

It will be understood that this device, or any of the parts thereof, may be made of any material and the material should be such that it will withstand the chemical action of the acids used in ink eradicating or removing fluids. These materials may also be machined or molded and may be formed so that the parts may be held together by threads, as shown, or in any manner. It may be preferred to make these parts of glass or an acid resisting, transparent or translucent material, and these materials may be colored or provided in different designs, so that the device may be very attractive, or finished in any manner. The device may also be incorporated in a fountain pen and may be made of the same material as,the pen, or ot any material that may be used therewith. The difierent parts may also be made of' different materials, as it will be noted that the acid does not contact the upper part of the casing or cap, so that this may be made of celluloid, or any similarmaterial.

In the design shown the cap i is threaded on a shank of the section 2, as shown at the point 5, and the section 2 is threaded on a shank 8 of the tip 3, as shown at the point I, however,

it will be understood that these parts may be of any design and may be removably secured together in any manner. The tip may also be covered with an additional cap 8, as shown in Figure 3, as this cap may be used on the design shown in Figures 1 and 2, in which the outer surface may be provided with threads 9, or the cap may be held by friction, similar to the cap of a fountain pen. This cap may be made plain, as shown in Figure 2, so that it may readily be removed when it is desired to refill the device as, with the cap removed, the rubber cap or sack may be squeezed or released in order to refill the device. The cap I may, however, be provided with a filler, as shown in Figure 9, or in any of the other figures, so that the sack may be filled without removing the cap, and it will be understood that any other means may be used for readily refilling the device.

0n the inside of the tip 3 is an opening it, which extends continuously therethru, and the upper end of theopening is counter-sunk, as shown at the point I I, so that the head I21 of a plunger l3 may be accommodated therein with a valve disc Id resting upon a valve seat l5 on the upper end of the tip. This valve may also be formed in any other manner or any type of valve may be used. The valve disc Hi is resiliently held downward by a spring l6 and this member may be provided with grooves ll in the outer edge thereof, as shown in Figure 2, or these grooves may be omitted and grooves i8 may be provided on the interior of the section 2, as shown in Figures 4 and 5. This valve member may be provided in any other form and any other means may be used for permitting the fluid to pass when the valve is in theopen position, as shown in Figure 4'. made slightly larger than the opening H9, in which it is mounted, so that the fluid may pass around the edges thereof. The spring. il engages the upper surface of disc id and the opposite end thereof rests against the upper end 20 of the opening i9. It will be understood that, altho this spring is shown of a conical shape, it may also be of any shape and may be arranged in any manner. The spring may be replaced by a rubber member, as shown in Figure 13, or any other means may be provided for resiliently holding the valve in the closed position. An opening 2i extends upward from the upper end of the opening it extending thru the shank t and also thru a nipple 22 at the upper end thereof over which a rubber cap 23 may be placed, which may be compressed and released to draw material into the device with the valve in the open The disc M may also bev as snown in Figures 2 and 6, or may be provided with an opening 25 in the center, as shown in Figures 4 and 7, or may be provided with two openings 28 and 21 extending therethru, as shown in Figure 8, in which it will be noted that one opening will permit the fluid to run downward and the other will form a by-pass to permit the air. to pass upward, thereby relieving the vacuum formed in the reservoir. The upper end of the plunger is provided with a recess 28 in which a small amount of the fluid may rest after the valve is closed, and this will be heldby capillary attraction until the valve is opened, at which time it will be released so that it may pass down the plunger and upon the paper or surface from which it is desired to remove ink, or the like. The recess 28 may be of any shape or design and may be arranged in any manner. however, it will be noted that it communicates with the grooves or passages extending down the plunger.

This device may be used independently or may be provided in combination with a fountain pen, pencil, or other device, and may be incorporated in a fountain pen, as shown in Figure 3, in which the cap I is omitted and the shank 4 threaded into the upper end of the shell of the fountain pen, as indicated at the point 29. A rubber cap 30, similar to the rubber cap 23, will extend into the opening in the shell beyond the end of the sack of the pen, which is indicated by the numeral 31. In this design. the tip 3 will extend out of the end of the pen shell and may be provided with a cap 8 forming a closure, or this cap may be omitted and the pen cap, which is indicated by the numeral 32, may be placed over this end while using the pen. The cap may also be formed so that the cap 32 may be placed over this device with the cap 8 in place, or with it removed, as may be desired.

In the design shown in Figure 9 a cap i is provided with a spring 33, which may be positioned in the upper part of the cap and engaged by the inner end 36 of a lever 35 that may be pivotally mounted on a pin 36 in a member 31 in one side oi. the cap. These parts are arranged so that, as the lever 35 is drawn outward, the end 3% will press the spring 33 inward against the sack, thereby compressing the sack 23, and it will be noted that,:as the member 35 is snapped back into the position shown, the sack will be released and fluid may be drawn upward thru the lower end. When filling the device, it is necessary that the plunger it be pressed against the surface of the container in which the fiuid is held, so that the valve at the upper end of the stem will be open.

In the design shown in Figure 10 the device is provided with a spring 38 which is pivotally mounted on a pin 39, and the upper end is formed with a lever $8, to which a stem ti is connected. The stem .di is slidably held in an opening d2 in the end of the cap, which is indicated by the numeral 43, and at the outer end of the stem is a button M, by which it may be pressed inward to force the spring 38 against the sack.

In the design shown in Figure 11 the cap, which is indicated by the numeral 45, is formed with an inner slidable cap 46, which is similar to a piston, and this cap is provided with an aperture 41 in the end. It will be noted that, as the thumb or finger is placed over the aperture El and the cap 46 pressed inward with a comparatively quick movement, the air inside of the cap 45 will be compressed and this will aoaaisa squeeze the sack 23 so that, as the finger or thumb is removed from the aperture iii and air admitted to the cap, the sack 23 may expand and thereby draw in fluid to refill the device.

The design shown in Figure 12 shows an alternate arrangement in which the upper end of the plunger i3 is formed with a flat disc till providing a head, and this disc is resiliently held downward by the spring it. A rubber washer 19 is placed on the under side of the disc, and this rests upon a ring d extending upward from the surface of the tip 3, providing a valve seat with the valve member resiliently held downward by the spring it and adapted to be raised by pressing the point of the plunger it against the surface so that it will pass upward inside of the device.

It has been found, however, that the only metal capable of resisting the acid of ink eradicating fluids is gold and, therefore, it has been necessary to use a gold spring, so that it is preferred to replace this spring with a rubber member 5i, which may be of any shape or design, and may be arranged in any manner. In the design shown in Figure 13, the upper end of the member iii is recessed in a groove 52 in the member 2, and the lower end rests upon the head 5% of the plunger it. In this design, the opening 2i is provided with a wide groove 53, thru which the liquid may pass into the chamber is above the valve. The member 5i is also provided with longitudinal grooves 5t and cross grooves 56' in the upper end thereof, also permitting passage for the ink eradicating fluid from the channel iii to the chamber i9. It will be understood that the grooves in the rubber may be omitted, and the groove 53 may be made sumciently large to accommodate all the fluid, or any number of the grooves 53 may be used, or the groove 53 may be omitted and only the grooves in the rubber used. It will be understood that any other means may be used for providing passage of the fluid from the passage 2| to the chamber Hi. In this design a rubber ring 55 is placed on the lower side'of the head it, and this contacts the bead 5i? forming in the valve C. As hereinbefore' stated, any other means may be used for resil-,

iently holding the valve closed, a valve of any other type or design may be used, and any other means may be used for providing a flow of the fluid to the valve.

In the design shown in Figure 14 the device is provided with a spring 51, one end 58 of which extends into the fountain pen section of the device so that it may compress the sack therein, and the other end 59 of which extends into the ink eradicating section, so that it may compress the sack 23 therein. The springs 58 and 59 may be forced inward by levers similar to the lever 40 shown in Figure 9, or by any means desired. It will also be understood that any other means may be used for compressing the sack from the exterior of the casing in order to refill the device.

It will be understood that other changes may be made in the device without departing from the spirit of the invention. One of which changes may be in the use of any other arrangement of the parts, another may be in the use of a casing of a larger or smaller size, so that a larger or smaller amount of fluid may be contained therein, another may be in the use of other means for opening the valve as it is desired to use the fluid, and still another may be in the use of other means for ejecting the fluid, as it is desired.

The construction will be readily understood from the foregoing description. In use the device may be provided as shown and described, and it will be noted that with the lower end of the tip held in a container so that the valve will be open, and with the rubber cap 23 squeezed together and released, the fluid will be drawn upward into the cap and as the device is removed the valve will automatically close and hold the fluid in the upper part thereof. The device may, therefore, readily be refilled by removing the cap i and placing the tip in an ink eradicating or removing fluid.

When it is desired to use the device the lower end of the plunger may be pressed upon paper having ink thereon or upon any surface, and it will be noted that with the plunger pressed upward into the tip the valve will be opened, as shown in Figure and a small amount of the fluid may pass out of the lower end and upon the surface. The fluid may, therefore, be applied at any point desired.

Having thus fully described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

l. A fluid container and dispenser comprising a casing, a reservoir in one end of the casing, a plunger having a recess in the upper end adapted to hold a small amount of fluid extending thru a tip in the opposite end and a valve positioned above the plunger adapted to be opened by said plunger as it is moved inward.

2. A device as described in claim 1 in which the plunger is provided with grooves in each side providing a discharge passage for the fluid and also an inlet passage for air.

8. A dispensing device having a central casing, a tip extending from said casing and a valve positioned above and seated against the end of the tip, a plunger having space for a small amount of fluid in the inner end thereof forming a reservoir beyond the valve extending thru said tip adapted to open said valve as it is moved inward, a reservoir extending upward from said casing, and a cap enclosing said reservoir.

4. An ink eradicating device comprising a central casing forming a body having a central opening forming a reservoir with an opening communicatlng with the upper end thereof, a tip threaded in the lower end having a central opening extending through said tip, a plunger extending through said opening, said plunger having separate grooves in the opposite sides thereof, one for the outward passage of the fluid and the other for the inward passage of air as the tip is pressed inward, a valve member positioned against and seated upon the inner end of said tip, said valve member forming a closure for the opening in said tip, resilient means in the central opening of said casing holding said valve member closed, a sack forming a storage chamber fitted over and extending upward from the upper end of said central casing, said sack communicating with the opening extending through the upper end of said casing, and a removable cover for said sack.

TEOFIL L. BONKOWSIH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2481803 *Apr 25, 1945Sep 13, 1949Weaver Dorothy EApplicator for ink eradicators
US2624902 *Mar 9, 1949Jan 13, 1953Soldner Jack OFountain marking device with work operable valve
US2637466 *Apr 12, 1949May 5, 1953Wright Donald CPocket marking pen
US2643409 *Jun 11, 1947Jun 30, 1953Marsh Stencil Machine CompanyFountain marker
US2847691 *Aug 4, 1955Aug 19, 1958Dupli Color Products Company IFountain applicator
US3366261 *May 13, 1965Jan 30, 1968Carole R. DeweyDispenser valve
US4156657 *Apr 4, 1977May 29, 1979Burroughs CorporationAmine decoloring agent to neutralize acid dye and form colorless product
US4213717 *Nov 13, 1978Jul 22, 1980Burroughs CorporationDecoloring by treating colored acid solution with base
US4217994 *Apr 22, 1977Aug 19, 1980Claus Koenig K.G.Glue dispenser in form of a bottle
US4228028 *Nov 13, 1978Oct 14, 1980Burroughs CorporationBall point pen, ink, and its eradicator system
US4364684 *Jun 11, 1980Dec 21, 1982Pentel Kabushiki KaishaWriting instrument
US4522525 *Jun 23, 1983Jun 11, 1985Pentel Kabushiki KaishaWriting instrument having a needle slidably mounted in a tubular tip
US4605331 *Dec 26, 1984Aug 12, 1986Kurt HeldPressurized writing device with needle weight having valve means
US4776718 *May 9, 1986Oct 11, 1988Schmidt Feintechnik GmbhFor liquid ink
US5387046 *Oct 25, 1993Feb 7, 1995Kabushiki Kaisha Mikado SeisakushoApplying implement having an application tip shiftable independently of a valve member
US5549742 *Sep 16, 1993Aug 27, 1996Gillette CompanyAssembly or set of different color inks and an assembly of writing instruments
US5649999 *Apr 8, 1996Jul 22, 1997The Gillette CompanyInk eradicator system
US5676481 *Jun 11, 1996Oct 14, 1997Gillette CompanyMarking instruments
US5916357 *Mar 25, 1997Jun 29, 1999The Gillette CompanyEradicable inks
US6149721 *Feb 3, 1999Nov 21, 2000The Gillette CompanySolvent-based pen inks
US6905539Jul 15, 2003Jun 14, 2005Sanford L.P.Water, dyes of diarylmethane, triarylmethane, methine, green, yellow, and blue and a slow evaporating solvent
US7083665Oct 7, 2003Aug 1, 2006Sanford, L.P.Highlightable marking composition, method of highlighting the same, highlightable marking composition kit, and highlighted marking composition complex
US7163575Jul 15, 2004Jan 16, 2007Sanford, L.P.Water-based, resin-free and solvent-free eradicable ball-pen inks
US7229487Jan 14, 2004Jun 12, 2007Sanford, L.P.A volatile base: a pH sensitive dye, e.g., o-cresolphthalein, thymolphthalein, and/or phenolphthalein; and an eradicating agent,wherein the dye changes color as the volatile base evaporates; may also contain sodium perborate or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as a stabilizer
US7427318Oct 1, 2004Sep 23, 2008Sanford, L.P.Highlightable and highlighted mixtures, marking instruments, and methods of using the same
US7442725Feb 11, 2004Oct 28, 2008Sanford, L.P.Reliable visual indication; writing or printing erasure; water, volatile base or acid and pH indicator; turns clear or white when dry
US7452146Jun 11, 2007Nov 18, 2008Sanford, L.P.Writing instruments with eradicable inks and eradicating fluids
US7488380May 11, 2006Feb 10, 2009Sanford, L.P.Highlighting marking compositions, highlighting kits, and highlighted complexes
US7704308Dec 21, 2004Apr 27, 2010Sanford, L.P.Method of highlighting with a reversible highlighting mixture, highlighting kit, and highlighted complex
US7735681Oct 17, 2006Jun 15, 2010Handfield MichaelMedicament container locking system and method
US7886931Aug 20, 2007Feb 15, 2011Michael HandfieldMedicament container system and method
US7996105Aug 20, 2007Aug 9, 2011Michael HandfieldMedicament dispensing authorization
US8110615Aug 4, 2006Feb 7, 2012Sanford, L.P.Correction fluids
CN1063986C *Mar 26, 1994Apr 4, 2001团野照Applying implement
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/186, 401/260, 401/292, 222/501, 401/18
International ClassificationB43K5/00, B43L19/00, B43K5/18
Cooperative ClassificationB43L19/0018, B43K5/1845
European ClassificationB43K5/18V1B1, B43L19/00B