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Publication numberUS2029541 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1936
Filing dateFeb 17, 1932
Priority dateFeb 17, 1932
Publication numberUS 2029541 A, US 2029541A, US-A-2029541, US2029541 A, US2029541A
InventorsMartinson Carl J
Original AssigneeMartinson Carl J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and means of double glazing window sash and doors
US 2029541 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 4, 1936- c. J. M-ARTlNsoN METHOD AND MEANS OF DOUBLE GLAZING WINDOW SASH AND DOORS Filed Feb. 17, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheff(l l Feb. 4, 1936. Q J. MARTINSQN 2,029,541

METHOD AND MEANS OF DOUBLE GLAZING WINDOW SASH AND DOORS Filed Feb. 17, 1932 2 sheets-sheet 2 S11/vanto@ ,Fw wfm Patented Feb. 4, 1936 PATENT OFFICE ltIETHOD AND MEANS OF DOUBLE GLAZING WINDOW SASH AND DOORS om J. Martin'son, Wayzata, Minn. Application February 17, 1932, Serial No. 593,488 4 Claims. (ci. zo-sas) My invention relates to the method and means of ldouble glazing window sash and doors so that the ordinary type of sash may be provided with an extra glass to double glaze the same and provide a means of preventing condensate or frosting on the windows in climates where the outer atmosphere becomes cold in the winter.

A feature of. the method resides in forming a groove around the window sash for the pane of glass and by means of my stock molding mem- -bers made after the pattern and formation of my invention securing the extra pane of glass in the window sash to provide the double glazing to seal the edges of the glass in the frame so that the air between the two panes of glass in the window sash isl virtually hermetically sealed from the outer atmosphere, thereby making a dead air space between the windows. This dead air space between the windows provides an insulating means which prevents the inner window from frosting over or collecting condensate which is commonly known as steaming of. the inside window-pane when there is a change in atmosphere between the inside and the outside. The invention includes the making of strips of molding with a cushion surface thereon made of rubber,

cork, felt or other suitable material. 'I'he cush-` ion surfaces of the molding are adapted. to engage the edges of the glass in carrying out my method of double glazing of window sashes.

By stock molding I mean my new form of molding made after the-construction described and as will be more fully hereinafter pointed out. The groove for the glass or molding can be readily Iformed in the ordinary type of window sash and then with my new stock molding having' the cushioned glass gripping surfaces it will be very Ieasy to change a single glazed window to a double glazed window and my moldings will seal the edge of the glass tightly so,'as to keep the dead air space between the two panes of glass in the sash after the same has been made over into the form of double glazing as defined by my method.

The double glazing may be accomplished in various manners to provide a means of insuring the sealing of the dead airspace between the window-panes and so as to bring the windowpanes and the double glazing'more closely together where a narrow sash is desired, or the window sash may be made of a particular construction so as to receive the double window-panes when they are made up at the time of manufacture of the window sash.

My method also includes a means of embedding the edge of the glass in a cushion channel and then securing the channel cushions around the edge of the glass firmly in place by my particular clamping means which will be later described, and then while the double windows are held by this cushion and clamping means the whole unit holding the glass together can be slipped into the window sash and anchored in place, thereby providing a double glazed window by my method of a very desirable nature.

All of the features and peculiarities of my 10 method and means for carrying out the same will be clearly defined.

In'the drawings forming part of this specilication:

Figure 1 is a sectional view of the window sash, 15 showing my method and means of double glazing the same.

Figure 2 is a perspective of a detail, showing the means of anchoring the window-pane for double glazing of. the sash by my method and means.

Figure 3 is a section similar to Figure 1, showing another form of carrying out my method.

Figure 4 is a section of double glazed window sash, using my method. 25

Figure 5 illustrates a section of one of the Window sashes, showing a further form of my means of double glazing of the same.

Figure 6 is still another form in section of a window sash, showing the double glazing as used in carrying out my method.

Figure 7 is aperspective, illustrating the construction of the unit binding for the double glazing of the window-pane as used in Figure 4.

Figure 8 shows a perspective of. a window-pane 35 having a single cushion channel around the marginal edge thereof as is used on each of the window-panes in Figure 3.

My invention consists in the method and means of double glazing window sash and doors, and the drawings illustrate the upper window sash I ii and the lower window sash Il in section and as they would appear, excepting being partly broken away, in position in the window frame. 'I'he drawings will assist in describing the method employed to provide the double glazing such as is applied to the regular standard window sash I0 and Il, like in Figure 1, and to the window sash l0 and Il illustrated in the other figures, where a particular construction is used to bind the marginal edges of the respective panes singularly or in double glazed position where a particular unit clamping means is employed to hold the double panes of glass together.

The window-pane I2 in the window sash l0 and 55 I I may be first anchored in the sash Aby dropping one edge into a groove I3 formed in one edge of the window frame where it is embedded in putty. The outer side of the glass pane rests against a portion of the frame.

My method consists in forming the sash III and II varound the remaining three sides of the window-pane on the inside with a glass and molding groove I4. This groove Il is adapted to accommodate the pane of glass I5, the glass pane I2, and the molding therebetween.

After the grooves I3 and I4 have been formed into the window sash I0 or II. or the door frame which ever it may be desirable to double glaze, an inner molding I8 with a cushioned surface I1 is secured in the groove I3. This cushion portion I1 may be provided with a lip I8 that may extend around the outer edge of the glass so that the glass may rest against the cushion and the lip I8 as shown by Figure 2. When the inner molding I6 formed with the cushioned surface I1 is in proper position, then the glass I5 is placed against the same, after which the outer and anchoring molding 28 is placed into the groove I 4. This anchoring molding 28 may be formed so that it may extend iiush with the inner surface of the window sash I0 or I I when anchored in place. as illustrated in Figure 1, 'I'he molding 20 is formed with a glass cushioning and engaging surface 2I which engages against the marginal edge of the glass and forces the same tightly against the cushion I1, thereby engaging the marginal edges of the glass between the cushions I1 and 2|, and sealing the same about its marginal edge. When the glass I5 is held adjacent to the outer glass I2 in the manner just described, the space 22 between the outer and inner windowpanes becomes a dead air space, thereby insulating the inner glass from the outer glass. The simple effective method of securing the inner glass by these sealing moldings which can be made so as to speak, a stock molding, permits any window sash to be double glazed by my method very readily. This method consists in forming a glass receiving groove in a window sash and also forming molding receiving grooves Where it is neces-- sary. Then the moldingis placed in the glass receiving groove with the cushioning surface projecting outwardly and the glass laid against the same, after which the anchoring and sealing molding is forced tightly against the marginall edge of the glass, thereby causing the sealing moldings to seal the edge of the inner glass in a manner to glaze the same in operative position to provide a double glazed window structure of a weather resisting nature and retarding frosting or steaming in the collecting of moisture on the inner window-pane. This simple method provides a very practical means of double glazing of virtually any form of window sash. Suitable screws such as 24 may be employed to hold the molding 20 in position to firmly engage and hold the glass I5 in place.

Each pane of glass I2 and I5 may be held individually in a marginal binding or cushion member 25 and a single molding such as 28 vused to squeeze or clamp the cushion portions 25 together against the shoulder molding 21 on the other side of the sash I8 and II, as illustrated in Figure 3 of the drawings.

It may also be desirable to provide a unitary clamping means for holding the cushion portions 25 extending around the glass I2 and I5, like that illustrated in Figure 4, where an angle metal binding member 28 is employed. The member 28 is formed with a central wire receiving groove 28 into which the binding wire 30 is adapted to extend. The member 28 is provided with side flanges 3| extending on either side of the central groove 28. After the cushion binding 25 has been placed around the marginal edge of the glass I2 and I5, then the metal binder 28 is carried around the outer edge of the cushion portions 25 with the central portion of the member 28 acting as a separator, such as 32, to hold the panes oi' glass apart and a groove 29 receiving the binding wire 38 which is drawn taut to hold the panes of glass I2 and I5 together as a unit. Then this unit is placed in the sash I 0 and II, as illustrated in Figure 4, after which a securing molding 33 is adapted to hold the unit in place in the sash. 'I'he flange members 3I are narrower than the width of the cushion members 25, thereby permitting the molding 33 to compress the cushion channels or binding 25 to hold the unit such as B which is formed of the two panes of glass I2 and I5 and bound bythe member 28, inthe sash frame firmly and under tension.

The binding cushion such as 25 may be made in a single piece 34, illustrated in Figure 5, if it is desired. In this construction the clamping member 28 is the same as used in Figures 4 and 7 and the wire 30 holds the same in place to hold the unit B collectively secured together.

When the glass is supported in a unit such as "i B, if it is desired, either of the glass panes I2 or I5 may be made in smaller panes and held together by molding strips such as 31 and 38, the molding 38 being positioned between the panes of glass in the dead air space 22 and thus a window may be formed with a series of panes connecting together or to divide the window up with molding in a very practical manner. The moldings 31 and 38 may be held together by screws or any other suitable means to clamp the same rigidly against the edges of the glass and the molding 38 may fit with a cushion member 39 resting against the glass I5 if it is desired, so as to hold the moldings firmly in place and to brace the panes oi' glass I2 and I5, one in relation to the other, at a point spaced from the inner glass holding portion of the window sash such as I8 and II.

An inner molding such as l0 may be employed to give the appearance of dividing the glass or unit B as illustrated in Figure 4, and a suitable cushion member 4I may be used to take up the inequalities between the window-panes I2 and I5 and hold the molding firmly between the two panes of glass so as to give the appearance of a divided window-pane, yet having a perfectly smooth outer surface both on the inside of the window and the outside thereof. This permits cleaning of the windows without the objectionable features of having the moldings which divide the window into small panes.

In Figure 6 I illustrate a form of construction quite similar to that illustrated in Figure 1. In this structure, the outer glass I2 is embedded in putty in a groove I3 along one edge of the frame and bears against the shoulder portion 43 extending about the other three sides of the window frame. A molding strip I6' is adapted to bear against the inside of the outer pane I2 and a second pane I5 such as is illustrated in Figure 8, having a cushion edge extending thereabouts, is adapted to bear against the molding strip I8. The two window panes I2 and I5 are held in place by a molding strip M which may be held in place by nails 45 or in any other suitable manner.

Figure 7 illustrates two adjacent window panes I 2 and I5, each provided with a resilient cushioning member extending along the edges thereof. Part of these cushions 25 have been broken away to show the construction thereof.

The advantages of my method and means of double glazing window sash and doors is of primary importance. It permits the double glass to be connected to the single sash, with the two panes of glass insulated one from the other so as to overcome the differences in temperature on the inside and outside of buildings and to pro vide a storm window without the necessity of a storm sash in climates where it becomes extremely cold outside during the winter months. With my simple effective means of binding the edges oi the glass together or anchoring` the same in a very inexpensive manner in the sash, double glazing may be accomplished wherein the windows are sealed one from the other and to provide a dead air space 22 between the windows which is hermetically sealed and into which no dust or dirt can collect, therefore making it unnecessary to clean the glass on the inside. Should it ever become necessary to remove the glass this may be accomplished very readily. Therefore, the glass may be easily replaced if broken or changed at any time should it be desired.

In accordance with the patent statues, I have described the principles of my method and means of double glazing window sash and doors and I desire to have the invention interpreted within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A double glazed window including, the main window-pane, a window sash for supporting said pane, a complemental window-pane receiving groove, an auxiliary window positioned in said groove, a removable non-resilient spacing strip between corresponding edges of said panes, and means for binding the marginal edge with a cushioning molding to hermetlcally seal the air oetween said window-panes to provide a double glazed window in a single sash.

2. A double glazed sash including, a main window-pane sealed and supported in said sash, an auxiliary window-pane, cushion engaging means for the marginal, edge of said auxiliary window-pane, a non-resilient removable spacing strip` extending between said cushion and said main window-pane, and molding means for holding said cushion engaging means in a manner to press the marginal edge of said auxiliary glass into sealing position in said sash and to press said spacing strip against said main windowpane to provide a dead air space between said window-panes.

3. The combination, a window and door sash, a window-pane xed in said sash, an auxiliary window, marginal cushion sealing means adapted. t

to extend about said auxiliary window, a nonresilient spacing strip between said cushion means and said window-pane, and means for binding said sealing means with said auxiliary window adjacent said main window to hermetically seal the space between said windows.

4. The combination, a window sash, a windowpane fixed in said sash, an auxiliary windowpane, a groove for receiving said auxiliary window, a cushion tape extending on either side of said auxiliary window in said receiving groove, a removable non-resilient spacing strip extending between said cushion tape and said rst named window-pane, and molding means for binding said auxiliary window by compressing said cushion tape marginally about said auxiliary window and for pressing said spacing strip against said rst named window-pane to hermetically seal the space between said window-panes.

CARL J. MAR'IINSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2524105 *Dec 18, 1944Oct 3, 1950Horace W HackerWindow
US4989384 *Jan 2, 1990Feb 5, 1991Rolscreen CompanyInsulated window assembly with internal muntin bars
US5653073 *Sep 15, 1995Aug 5, 1997Sne Enterprises, Inc.Fenestration and insulating construction
US5913786 *May 27, 1997Jun 22, 1999Mayer; E. HowardWindow sash
US6055783 *Sep 15, 1997May 2, 2000Andersen CorporationUnitary insulated glass unit and method of manufacture
US6463706Aug 2, 1999Oct 15, 2002Andersen CorporationUnitary insulated glass unit and method of manufacture
US6886297Jul 23, 1998May 3, 2005Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc.Insulating unitless window sash
US6889480Oct 15, 2002May 10, 2005Andersen CorporationUnitary insulated glass unit and method of manufacture
US7241352 *Aug 26, 2004Jul 10, 2007Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc.Insulating unitless window sash
US7293391Feb 9, 2005Nov 13, 2007Andersen CorporationUnitary insulated glass unit with vapor barrier
US20030037493 *Oct 15, 2002Feb 27, 2003Andersen CorporationUnitary insulated glass unit and method of manufacture
US20050022462 *Aug 26, 2004Feb 3, 2005Crandell Stephen L.Insulating unitless window sash
US20050132663 *Feb 9, 2005Jun 23, 2005Guhl James C.Unitary insulated glass unit and method of manufacture
WO2000005474A1 *Jul 13, 1999Feb 3, 2000Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc.Insulating unitless window sash
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/202, 52/204.593, 40/618
International ClassificationE06B3/64
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/64
European ClassificationE06B3/64