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Publication numberUS2029553 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1936
Filing dateFeb 25, 1935
Priority dateFeb 25, 1935
Publication numberUS 2029553 A, US 2029553A, US-A-2029553, US2029553 A, US2029553A
InventorsBartschi Arnold G, Huffine Robert L
Original AssigneeEdwards & Co J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe fitting index
US 2029553 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 4, 1936. A. G. BARTSCHI ET AL SHOE FITTING INDEX Filed Feb. 25, 1935 N VEN TORS, lie/VOL 0 6, 542 TECH/ 5255571 HUFF/NE &

Patented Feb, 4, 1936 UNITED STATES SHOE FITTING INDEX Arnold G. Bartschi, Oakmont, and Robert L.

Hufiine, Wynnewood, Pa., assignors to J. Edwards & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., a co poration of Pennsylvania Application February 25, 1935, Serial No. 8,104

5 Claims.

This invention relates to shoe fitting index, and has for an object to provide means cooperating with the X-ray fitting of shoes for determining with accuracy the proper fit.

It is well known that in the modern fitting of shoes, X-rays are employed, and by their assistance, the position of the foot within the shoe accurately determinable. This has added greatly to the proper fitting of shoes, but requires for its efiicient employment, highly specialized operatives. The present invention is directed to providing the shoe with such means for cooperating with the X-ray-fitting as to enable less skilled operators to successfully fit the foot.

At the present time shoes are made upon variously contoured vmachines for the purpose of fitting various feet, and the determination of the correct last for the foot is onerequiring great accuracy.

According to the present invention, an index is placed in or on the shoe sole/constructed of material which, in conjunction with X-rays, will be differentiated from the appearance of the foot structure or the shoe structure, and the index will point to or locate some particular important part or feature of the anatomical structure of the foot, whereby the proper positioning of the foot relative to the contour of the shoe will be assured.

The index may be of any material which will show contrast to the foot and shoe structure, but at the present time, seems desirable that it shall be of material substantially opaque to X-rays, such for instance as sheet lead or vulcanized rubber, but without in any way limiting the invention to such materials.

The invention, therefore, comprises employing some marker or pointer embedded in or placed upon the sole of the shoe, and indicating some exact location for the positioning of anatomical parts of the foot, to insure correct fitting of the foot. This may take the form of a pointer which would indicate some prominent anatomical part or other form, without limitation.

The drawing illustrates several embodiments of the invention and the views therein are as follows:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a shoe with the sole bent backwardly, showing an index embedded within the sole immediately under the outer sole,

Figure 2 is a similar perspective view showing the indexplaced within the sole, but against the insole,

Figure 3 is a perspective view of an index of different type,

Figure l is a perspective view of one form of index,

Figure 5 is a perspective view of another form of index,

Figure 6 is a schematic view of the anatomical structure of a foot employing the index shown at Figure 4, and

Figure '7 is a schematic view showing the anatomical structure of the foot in association with an index, as shown at Figure 5.

Like characters of reference indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views.

- It is well known that certain materials, among which are lead and vulcanized rubber, are practically opaque to X-rays, and it has been found possible, therefore, to employ an index of some such material embedded in or associated withv the sole of the shoe, which will, in association with X-rays, determine the exact positioning of the foot relative to the shoe by indicating whether or not the bony structure of the foot has been properly placed.

As shown at Figure 1, an index I is placed within the sole immediately between the outer.

sole H and a. filler l2. As shown at Figure 2, the same index is placed next to the insole I3 a part of the interlaying lamina being shown cut and rolled back for the purpose of exhibiting the index. As shown at Figure 6, this index I0 is properly positioned in the shoe to indicate that part shown at H, which is designed and contoured to accommodate the ball joint of the foot, that is to say, the articulation of the first metatarsal with the phlanges of the great toe.

While this joint is of such a nature as to insure the proper fitting of the shoe when properly positioned, it is, of course, obvious that the index may point out other features of the bony structure of the foot with equal or acceptable results.

As shown at Figure 3, the index I is shown of arcuate form and is similarly positioned relative to the sole of the shoe, so far as its being embedded therein or applied thereto. This arcuate index is intended to properly locate the anterior metatarsal arch of the foot, as indicated at Figure 7.

with such index, such index to be made of any,

appropriate or desirable material now known or hereinafter developed, which will contrast with parts or the foot structure or shoe structure when subjected to X-rays.

Of course, the shoe fitting index illustrated may be modified and changed "in various ways without departing from the invention herein set forth and hereinafter claimed.

We claim:--

1. The combination of a shoe including a sole. a narrow, transversely extending index strip embedded in the sole of the shoe, said index being composed of material visibly diflerentiated from foot and shoe structure under the action 01' X-rays, said index underlying the articulation of the first metatarsal and proximate phalange of the great toe.

2. The combination 0! a shoe including 'a sole, an index embedded in the sole, said index being composed of material opaque to X-rays and positioned to underlie the proper location of the aoaasus of a metallic index member embedded in the sole 10 and positioned to underlie the proper location of the articulation oi. the first metatarsal and proximate phalange of one of the toes.

5. The combination of a shoe including a sole.

of an index member comprising a narrow trans- 5 versely extending metallic strip embedded in the sole and positioned to underlie the proper location of the articulation of the first metatarsal and proximate phalange of one of the toes.

ARNOLD G. BARTSCHI. ROBERT L. HUFE'INE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2928110 *Oct 11, 1957Mar 15, 1960Donald L MottShoe fitting
US4168586 *Feb 24, 1977Sep 25, 1979Samis Philip LIdentification method and structure
US6415530 *Aug 23, 2000Jul 9, 2002H. Kevin CoplonMethod, system and shoe enabling the determination of fit from outside of the shoe
US6523289Mar 1, 2002Feb 25, 2003H. Kevin CoplonSystem and shoe enabling the determination of fit from outside of the shoe
US6651349 *Mar 1, 2002Nov 25, 2003Ion Beam Applications S.A.Outer-sole shoe fitting guide
US6748673 *May 30, 2002Jun 15, 2004H. Kevin CoplonMethod, system and shoe enabling the determination of fit from outside of the shoe
US7785302Mar 6, 2006Aug 31, 2010C. R. Bard, Inc.Access port identification systems and methods
US7947022Apr 7, 2009May 24, 2011C. R. Bard, Inc.Access port identification systems and methods
US7959615Jan 31, 2008Jun 14, 2011C. R. Bard, Inc.Access port identification systems and methods
US8029482Jun 8, 2010Oct 4, 2011C. R. Bard, Inc.Systems and methods for radiographically identifying an access port
US8177762Dec 28, 2005May 15, 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Septum including at least one identifiable feature, access ports including same, and related methods
US8257325Jun 20, 2008Sep 4, 2012Medical Components, Inc.Venous access port with molded and/or radiopaque indicia
US8382723Jun 13, 2011Feb 26, 2013C. R. Bard, Inc.Access port identification systems and methods
US8382724Sep 30, 2011Feb 26, 2013C. R. Bard, Inc.Systems and methods for radiographically identifying an access port
US8545460Apr 25, 2006Oct 1, 2013C. R. Bard, Inc.Infusion apparatuses and related methods
US8585663Mar 29, 2013Nov 19, 2013C. R. Bard, Inc.Access port identification systems and methods
US8603052Feb 25, 2013Dec 10, 2013C. R. Bard, Inc.Access port identification systems and methods
US8608713May 14, 2012Dec 17, 2013C. R. Bard, Inc.Septum feature for identification of an access port
US8641676Apr 3, 2012Feb 4, 2014C. R. Bard, Inc.Infusion apparatuses and methods of use
US8641688May 2, 2013Feb 4, 2014C. R. Bard, Inc.Assemblies for identifying a power injectable access port
US8715244Jul 7, 2010May 6, 2014C. R. Bard, Inc.Extensible internal bolster for a medical device
US8805478Apr 7, 2009Aug 12, 2014C. R. Bard, Inc.Methods of performing a power injection procedure including identifying features of a subcutaneously implanted access port for delivery of contrast media
US8852160Jul 16, 2012Oct 7, 2014Medical Components, Inc.Venous access port with molded and/or radiopaque indicia
US8932271Nov 13, 2009Jan 13, 2015C. R. Bard, Inc.Implantable medical devices including septum-based indicators
US8939947Feb 25, 2013Jan 27, 2015C. R. Bard, Inc.Systems and methods for radiographically identifying an access port
USRE30594 *Jun 7, 1979Apr 28, 1981 Positive identification method and structure
EP1311168A1 *Aug 22, 2001May 21, 2003Kevin H. CoplonMethod, system and shoe enabling the determination of fit from outside of the shoe
WO2002015731A1 *Aug 22, 2001Feb 28, 2002H Kevin CoplonMethod, system and shoe enabling the determination of fit from outside of the shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/1, 250/432.00R, 378/162, 12/120.5, 434/397, 36/140, 36/8.4
International ClassificationA43D1/02, A43D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43D1/027
European ClassificationA43D1/02D