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Publication numberUS2029645 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1936
Filing dateDec 18, 1933
Priority dateDec 18, 1933
Publication numberUS 2029645 A, US 2029645A, US-A-2029645, US2029645 A, US2029645A
InventorsWaugh Hugh L
Original AssigneeStran Steel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Structural element
US 2029645 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H L. WAUGH TRUCTURAL ELEMENT Feb. 4, 1936.

Filed Dec. 18, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet .1

INVENTOF'! flay 2% Z- Wa fi z/E ATTORNEY-8 Feb. 4, 1936. WAUGH 2,029,545

STRUCTURAL ELEMENT Filed. Dec. 18, 1955' z sheets-sheet 2 ATTORNEYJQF Patented Feb. 4, 1936 PATENT OFFICE STRUCTURAL ELEMENT Hugh L. Waugh, Ferndale, Mich., assignor to Stran-Steel Corporation, Detroit, Mich, a. corporation of Michigan Application December 18,

6 Claims.

The invention relates to structural elements and refers more particularly to structural ele ments, such as joists, studs and the like employed in buildings.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide an improved structural element having a bearing face for covering material equivalent to that provided by a corresponding wooden element and arranged to receive nails or equivalent securing means spaced transversely thereof for securing the covering material thereto, whereby the adjacent ends of different members forming the covering material may be individually supported upon and effectively secured to the structural element. Another object is to so construct the structural element that its parts may be readily and economically secured together. A further object is to form the structural element of metal and to so arrange and construct the parts thereof that the structural element is relatively light in weight.

These and other objects of the invention will become apparent from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a side elevation of a portion of a structural element showing an embodiment of my invention;

Figure 2 is a cross section on the line 22 of Figure 1; I

Figures 3, 4, 5, 6 and '7 are views similar to Figure 2 showing other embodiments of my invention;

Figure 8 is a side elevation of the embodiment shown in Figure 6;

Figure 9 is a side elevation of the embodiment shown in Figure '7.

The structural element shown in Figures 1 and 2 may be used as a joist, stud, rafter, or like element, in a building, such as a residence. This structural element comprises the pair of metallic flanged members 1 and 2 which, as shown, are channel members having the pairs of co-planar flanges 3 and 4 respectively at their edges and and the corrugations l and 8. Each intermediate 1933, Serial No. 703,001

member, as shown, is formed of the same gauge sheet metal as the channel member and has the outer wall In which is substantially in the same plane as the co-planar flanges 3 and 4 and the side walls H and I2 extending inwardly from the 5 outer wall In between the corrugated portions 1 and 8 and converging toward each other. These side walls have longitudinal transversely curved corrugations which are complementary to the adjacent corrugations l and 8 and'are substantially 10 uniformly spaced therefrom to form spaced curved slots for receiving the fastening elements, such as the nails or equivalent securing means l3 for securing the members l4 and forming part of the covering material against the bearing 15 faces formed by the co-planar flanges 3 and 4, the adjacent edges of these members preferably abutting at or near the median plane of the intermediate member. The widths of the slots or the spacing, the, curvature of the slots, and the rigidity of the portions of the channel members and intermediate member forming the walls of these slots are such that the fastening elements are caused to bend and thereby be clinched to the structural element and effectively held in position when driven in between the channel mem bers and intermediate member transversely thereof.

The channel members and intermediate merebers are rigidly secured together and, as shown in the present instance, the central portions of the channel members are provided inwardly of and adjacent the corrugations 1 and 8 with the bosses l6 spaced longitudinally thereof and abutting the inner edge portions of the side walls ll and 12 of each intermediate member. Suitable securing means, such as the rivets l'l, extend through these bosses and the inner edge portions and rigidly hold the parts in assembled relatioii.

With this construction, it will be seen that the 40 co-planar flanges 3 and t and the outer wall IU- of the intermediate member form bearing faces for individually supporting adjacent members forming part of the'covering material'and extending transversely of the structural element. It will also be seen that the parts forming the structural element may be readily and effectively secured together.

In the modification shown in Figure 3, the metallic structural element com-prises the pairs of flange members l8 and I9 which are in the na ture of angle irons. Each pair of angle irons has the co-planar flanges 20 andthe flanges 2| extending from the inner edges of the co-planar flanges toward the other pair of angle irons. The

last mentioned flanges have longitudinal, transversely curved corrugations which are complementary. 22 is the web member which in the present instance forms the intermediate member. This web member extends between the pairs of angle irons and has at its edges the longitudinal transversely curved corrugations 23 which are complementary to the corrugations of the angle irons. The edges of the web member terminate in substantially the planes of the outer faces of the flanges 20 and are preferably pointed. The corrugations 23 are spaced from the corrugated portions of the angle irons to form spaced curved slots to receive and retain the fastening elements in the same manner as the structure shown in Figures 1 and 2. The angle irons and the web member are preferably secured together by suitable securing means 24, such as rivets, which extend through the portions of the web member 22 adjacent the corrugations 23 and the bosses 25 at the inner edge portions of the flanges 2|.

Figure 4 shows another modification in which 26 is the web member of the structural element and 21 and 28 are the flanged members at the edges of the web member. These flanged members are preferably in the nature of angle irons and have the co-planar flanges 29 and the flanges 30 extending from the inner edges of the coplanar flanges and converging toward each other. These flanges 30 have longitudinal transversely curved corrugations. 3| is the intermediate member similar to the intermediate member 9 of Figures 1 and 2, but having the inner edge portions 32 of its side walls spaced apart to receive the edges of the web member 26. The longitudinal transversely curved corrugations 33 of the side walls of the intermediate member are substantially uniformly spaced from the corrugations of the flanges 30 to form spaced curved slots for receiving and retaining the fastening elements. The inner edge portions of the flanges 30 are formed with the bosses 34 which contact with the inner edge portions 32 of the side walls of the intermediate member. Suitable securing means, such as the rivets 35, extend through these bosses, the inner edge portions of the side walls of the intermediate member, and the edge portion of the web member.

Figure 5 discloses another modification of structural element in which the intermediate member 36 is integral with the web member 31 I and formed from the same metal sheet or plate.

As shown, one of the side walls of the intermediate member connects integrally into the web member and the other side wall terminates adjacent the zone of connection of the first side wall of the web member. Also in this construction, the co-planar flanges 38 of the flanged members or angle irons terminate at their outer edges in the flanges 38' extending in the same general direction as the corrugated flanges, there by additionally reinforcing the structural element. The inner edge portions of the flanges 39 of the flanged members are formed with the spac-- ing bosses through which the securing means extends.

Figures 6 and 8 disclose a trussed type of structural element in which the web member is in the nature of the round rod 40 alternately connected to the upper and lower chords at longitudinally spaced points. Each of these chords is formed of the pair of flanged members 4| which are, in the nature of angle irons formed in the same manner as the flanged members of Figure 4. The intermediate member 42 is preferably formed of a metal sheet or plate of substantially the same gauge as the flanged members and has the outer wall 43 in the same plane as the coplanar flanges of the flanged members. The intermediate member also has the inwardly converging side walls 44 cooperating with the corrugated flanges of the flanged members to form the spaced curved slots for receiving and retaining the fastening elements. The web member or rod 40 zig zags between the pairs of flanged members and the bases of its U-shaped portions 45 extend between the inner edge portions of the side walls 44 and are suitably secured thereto as by welding. The flanged members may be suitably secured in assembled relation as by welding the bosses at the inner edge portions of the flanged members to the inner edge portion of the side walls 44.

Figures '7 and 9 disclose another construction of structural element in which the flanged members 46 are integral with or welded to the web member 41, the latter comprising the truss rods 48. The flanged members of each pair, as shown, are integral and they cooperate with the side walls of the intermediate member 49 to form rounded slots for receiving and retaining the fastening elements. This intermediate member is tubular and is suitably secured to the flanged members, for example, by providing the latter with bosses for engaging the side walls of the spacer and being secured thereto as by welding. The outer wallof each intermediate member in this construction is also substantially in the same plane as the co-planar flanges of the flanged members.

From the above description, it will be readily seen that I have provided an improved structural element which is adapted to support the adjacent ends of different members forming the covering material and to which these adjacent ends may be effectively secured. It will also be seen that the structural elements are formed of metal sheets or plates and the parts are so constructed and arranged that they may be readily and economically secured together and the structural elements may be of relatively light weight and of great strength.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. In a structural element, flanged members having substantially co-planar flanges and flanges extending in the same direction from the inner edges of said co-planar flanges and formed with longitudinal transversely curved corrugations, an intermediate member between said last mentioned flanges and having a portion substantially uniformly spaced from each to form laterally spaced curved slots to receive and retain fastening elements, and means inwardly of said corrugations for rigidly securing said flanged members and intermediate member in assembled relation.

2. In a metallic structural element, metallic angle members having substantially co-planar flanges and flanges extending in the same direction from the inner edges of said co-planar flanges, said last mentioned flanges having longi tudinal transversely curved corrugations, and a metallic intermediate member between said last mentioned flanges and having a portion substantially uniformly spaced from each to form laterally spaced curved slots to receive and retain 'fastening elements and a portion extending between said last mentioned flanges inwardly of their corrugations, and means for securing said ill) last mentioned portion directly to said last mentioned flanges.

3. In a structural element, flanged members having substantially co-planar flanges. and flanges extending in the same direction from the inner edges of said co-planar flanges and formed with longitudinal transversely curved corrugations, and an intermediate member between said last mentioned flanges and having spaced longitudinal transversely curved corrugations, the corrugations of said last mentioned flanges and intermediate member being complementary to form laterally spaced curved slots to receive and retain fastening elements, and means inwardly of said corrugations for securing said flanged members'and intermediate member in assembled relation.

4. In a structural element, flanged members having substantially co-planar flanges and flangestions of said last mentioned flanges to form spaced curved slots to receive and retain fastening elements, a web member extending between said side walls and means inwardly of said corrugations for securing said flanged members, intermediate member and web together.

5. In a structural element, flanged member flanges extending ,from the inner edges of said co-planar flanges and converging toward each other and formed with longitudinal transversely curved corrugations, a hollow intermediate member between said last mentioned flanges and having an outer wall in substantially the plane of said co-planar flanges and side walls extending from said outer wall and converging toward each other, said side walls being substantially uniformly spaced from the corrugations of said last mentioned flanges to form spaced curved slots to receive and retain fastening elements, a web member bar extending between said side walls at points spaced longitudinally thereof, and means inwardly of said corrugations for securing said angle members, spacer and. bar together.

6. In a structural element, flanged members having substantially co-planar flanges and flanges extending from the inner edges of said co-planar flanges and converging toward each other and formed with longitudinal transversely curved corrugations and an intermediate member between said last mentioned flanges and having an outer wall in substantially the plane of said co-planar flanges and side walls extending from said outer wall and converging toward each other and substantially uniformly spaced from the corrugations of said last mentioned flanges to form spaced curved slots to receive and retain fastening elements, a web member, and

' means inwardly of said slots for rigidly securing said web member and flanged members together.

HUGH L. WAUGH.

having substantially co-planar flanges and

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2454604 *Feb 26, 1947Nov 23, 1948Heim Edward AJoist and girder construction
US2477394 *Jul 18, 1946Jul 26, 1949Spiker Ralph ERadiant heating bar joist
US2573345 *Apr 26, 1948Oct 30, 1951Leedy Walter LNailer section
US2578465 *Oct 7, 1946Dec 11, 1951Davisbilt Steel Joist IncMetal joist
US3242621 *May 5, 1961Mar 29, 1966Temple Willson LouCover-supporting member of end-united segments
US4548014 *Mar 28, 1980Oct 22, 1985James KnowlesMetal joist construction
US5499480 *Feb 2, 1994Mar 19, 1996Bass; Kenneth R.Lightweight metal truss and frame system
US5664388 *Nov 3, 1995Sep 9, 1997Donna BassStructural shear resisting member and method employed therein
US5692353 *Mar 30, 1995Dec 2, 1997Bass, Deceased; Kenneth R.Lumber-compatible lightweight metal construction system
US5842318 *Nov 19, 1997Dec 1, 1998Bass, Deceased; Kenneth R.Lumber-compatible lightweight metal construction system
US5904025 *Jul 18, 1997May 18, 1999Donna BassMethod for reinforcing a structural frame
US6170217 *Mar 31, 1999Jan 9, 2001Darrell G. MeyerBearing elements and methods relating to same
US6802170Jan 7, 2003Oct 12, 2004Kurt K. DavisBox beam and method for fabricating same
US6976343 *Apr 24, 2003Dec 20, 2005Mcgushion Kevin DCompressive flange sinusoidal structural member
US8397462Jun 3, 2011Mar 19, 2013Usg Interiors, LlcOpen web grid runner
US8490362 *Apr 5, 2007Jul 23, 2013The Boeing CompanyMethods and systems for composite structural truss
US9021759 *Jun 13, 2012May 5, 2015Usg Interiors, LlcSerpentine insert for open web grid
US9340977 *Apr 17, 2015May 17, 2016Lakdas NanayakkaraMulti-element constructional assembly for joist girders
US20050210819 *Apr 24, 2003Sep 29, 2005Mcgushion Kevin DCompressive flange sinusoidal structural member
US20060053732 *Jan 7, 2003Mar 16, 2006Watson Dennis PCold-formed steel joists
US20080155934 *Dec 29, 2006Jul 3, 2008Usg Interiors, Inc.Easy cut suspension grid
US20080245928 *Apr 5, 2007Oct 9, 2008Kulesha Richard LMethods and systems for composite structural truss
US20110107724 *May 12, 2011Lakdas NanayakkaraMulti-element constructional assembly
WO1986000950A1 *Jul 24, 1985Feb 13, 1986Schweizerische Aluminium AgDevice for retaining snow
WO1994023149A1 *Mar 30, 1994Oct 13, 1994Bass, Donna, R.Lightweight metal truss and frame system
WO2000046459A1 *Feb 3, 2000Aug 10, 2000Darrell MeyerWeight bearing systems and methods relating to same
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/377, 52/696, 52/694, 52/692
International ClassificationE04C3/04, E04C3/09, E04C3/07
Cooperative ClassificationE04C2003/0439, E04C2003/0456, E04C3/09, E04C2003/043, E04C2003/0434, E04C2003/0491, E04C2003/0413, E04C3/07
European ClassificationE04C3/07, E04C3/09