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Publication numberUS2030040 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1936
Filing dateDec 8, 1934
Priority dateDec 8, 1934
Publication numberUS 2030040 A, US 2030040A, US-A-2030040, US2030040 A, US2030040A
InventorsHynes George T, Smith Gordon S
Original AssigneeHynes George T, Smith Gordon S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shipping container
US 2030040 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 4, 1936.- 5. T. HYNES ET AL 2,030,040

SHIPPING CONTAINER Filed Dec. 8, 1.954

Patented Feb. 4, 1936 SHIPPING CONTAINER George Hynes and Gordon S. Smith, BIIa-CYHWYG, P8.

Application December 8, 1934, Serial No. 756,565

'1 Claims. (01. 206-59) Our invention relates to an improved shipping container.

A principal object of the invention is to provide a container for rugs, piece goods or other 5 merchandise that is shipped in rolled form, and requires a container that will withstand the strains and abuse incident to the handling, shipment and storage of this type of merchandise, and also be of light weight and low cost.

A further object of the invention is to provide a container constructed to afford particular pro tection to the ends of the rolled rugs or merchandisc and will, by reason of the strength and rigidity obtained, protect against bending, cracking 5 or chipping of the ends, as well as against abrasion that might be caused by relative movement between the layers of the rolled material.

A further object of the invention is to provide a container that is constructed in two sections.

each completely fabricated in a permanent manner at the plant of the container manufacturer, and requires only the taping of a single joint at the plant of the merchandise shipper to assemble the container about the merchandise.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a container, of great strength and convenience of use, that can be readily opened and resealed without impairing its strength.

Our improved container is particularly adapted for the shipment. of linoleum type rugs, and though the invention is not limited or confined to such particular use, we have shown in the annexed drawing, and specified, the details of construction and manner of use when applied to this service.

The container comprises two relatively inverted sections telescoped over opposite ends of the rolled rug and joined together by means of a gummed tape overlapping the circumferential joint between the sections. A permanent load ring is fixed within the outer end of each section and is conterminous with the annular edge of the rolled rug at each end of the container.

The improved container is preferably constructed with a body formed of spiral wound tubing and either spiral or straight wound load rings. The material used for these parts is preferably paperboard or fibreboard. The discs which may be used at the ends of the container to keep out dust can be cut from sheet fibreboard. The load rings are preferably fixed within the tube by wire stitching, but may be riveted in place. We prefer to use cloth tape forthe joint between the sections, but other suitable fastening means may be used.

In the drawing, in which like reference numerals designate like parts in the different figures: Fig. 1 is a perspective view of the two sections of our improved container partially telescoped on a rolled rug. 5

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the two sections of the improved container in adjoining relation and united by gummed tape over the joint between the sections.

Fig. 3 is a cross section on a central plane of our 10 improved container and of a rolled rug therein.

Fig. 4 is a cross section, to an enlarged scale, of one end of the container shown in Fig. 3.

Referring to Fig. 1, reference numeral I0 designates the rug or other roll of merchandise ter- 15 minating at an edge II. Partially telescoped over one end of the roll III is the container section I2 and partially telescoped over the opposite end of the roll III is the container section I3. The load ring I4 is fixed in the end of the container section 20 I2 by means of the wire stitches I5. A similar load ring is fixed in the outer end of the container section I3 by means of the wire stitches I5. The inner end of the section I2 is shown at I6 and the inner end of the section I3 is shown at ll. 25

Referring to Fig. 2, the container sections I2 and I3 have been moved inwardly, on the roll of merchandise, until their inner edges I6 and I! contact along the circumferential joint I8. A suitable length of gummed tape I9 is afilxed 30 around the joint I8 and engages the container sections I2 and I3 to hold the same in contact.

When the container is assembled as shown in Fig. 2 it is ready for shipment.

Referring to Fig. 3 and Fig. 4, the container sec- 5 tions I2 and I3 are telescoped over the rolled rug I0 and contact at the joint I8. The tape I9 serves as a splicing means to join the two sections .of the container as described above. The load rings II are fixed in the outer ends of the container 40 sections by means of the wire stitches I5.

It will be noted that the load rings I4 are conterminous with the roll of material within the container and the direct support thus given to the container load is one of the important fea- 45 tures of our invention. A flat disc 20 may be used, if desired, between the edge of the rolled rug and the load ring to act as a dust guard.

The inner diameter of the container conforms closely to the outer diameter of the rolled rug. The inside length of the combined sections of the container between the load rings is just sufficient to permit the inner edges of the sections to make contact at the central joint.

It is pointed out that the rolled rug provides 55 great strength in itself to resist fiexure and therefore the lifting of the loaded container by the ends, places no undue strain upon the taped joint between the sections of the container. The function of the tape is to hold the sections in contact and since the glued surface of the tape is solely in shear in performing this function, a very great resistance is inherent in the joint to any force tending to separate the sections.

The anvil of a power stitching or riveting machine may be entered within the central opening 2| of the load ring it. Because of this fact the load rings H can be fixed within the ends of the container sections so securely that forpractical purposes they become integral therewith. It will be understood that our improved containers are often used, and are particularly adapted for the shipment of large and heavy rugs. One of the common sizes of rug requires a-container 108" long inside. The advantage of permanently fixing the load rings in half length container sections of this size, prior to loading, will be obvious.

In the commercial embodiment of our invention, at present, the tubular body of the containers range from 5 to 12 inches in diameter and up to 108 inches inside length of the combinedsections. The tube walls range M; to inch in thickness depending on the load requirements. The load rings are of suitable dimensions in each container to support the entire load under all conditions. The dust discs can be cut from fibreboard of an inch or less in thickness. Standard weight and width of container stitching wire is preferably used to fix the load rings in the container.

The importance of the load ring being co-extensive with the load has been pointed out. In a shipment of rugs made of linoleum, whether of cork or printed felt-base type, it is imperative that no deflection of the rug edges or relative movement between the layers of the rolled rug take place, otherwise damage to the rugwill result. Heretofore, heavy, bulky and expensive wooden boxes were quite universally used for this service.

The tape sealing means employed to join the container sections permits of the ready inspection of the merchandise and the replacing of vthe container in its original condition by either using a new piece of tape or re-gluing the original piece. In either case the container may be opened and closed a great number of times without damage to it.

We claim:

l. A package of merchandise comprising a piece of merchandise in rolled form and two relatively inverted container sections that telescope the oppositely disposed ends of said roll of merchandise and make contact at their inner edges so as to inclose the said roll within the said container; each of said container sections consisting of a tubular body and a load ring permanently fixed in the outer end of said tube, by means of metallic elements passing through said tube and load ring and clinched within said load ring; said load rings being substantially conterminous with the annular edges of the roll of merchandise and adapted to directly support said merchandise during all positions of said container; a pair of relatively thin discs, capable of withstanding compressive stress alone, positioned transversely of said container between said load rings and said merchandise, to prevent entry of dust; and a gummed tape overlapping the circumferential joint between said container sections to hold said sections in contact with each other.

2. A package of merchandise comprising a piece of merchandise in rolled form and two relatively inverted container sections that telescope the oppositely disposed ends of said roll of merchandise and make contact at their inner edges so as to inclose the said roll within the said container; each of said container sections consisting of a tubular body and a load ring permanently fixed in the outer end of said tube, by means of metallic elements passing through said tube and load ring and clinched within said load ring; said load rings being substantially conterminous with the annular edges of the roll of merchandise and adapted to directly support said merchandise during all positions of said container; and a gummed tape overlapping the circumferential joint between said container sections to hold said sections in contact with each other.

3. Ashipping container for a rug comprising two relatively inverted sections to inclose a rolled rug within said sections; each section having at its outer end a load ring substantially co-extensive with the annular edge of the rolled rug; metallic elements passing through said section and said load ring and clinched within said load ring to effect a permanent Junction between said section and said ring; a disc positioned transversely of said section to prevent entry of dust; and a gummed tape overlapping the circumferential joint between said sections to hold said sections in contact with each other.

i 4. A shipping container for a rug comprising two relatively inverted sections to inclose a rolled rug within said sections; each section having at its outer end a load ring substantially co-extensive with the annular edge of the rolled rug; metallic elements passing through said section and said load ring and clinched within said load ring to eflect a permanent junction between said section and said ring; and a gummed tape overlapping the circumferential joint between said sections to hold said sections in contact with each other.

5. A shipping container for a roll of merchandise comprising two relatively inverted sections to inclose a roll of merchandise within said sections; each section having a load ring substantially conterminous with the annular edge of the roll of merchandise, permanently fixed in the outer end of said section, by means of metallic elements passing through said section and load ring and clinched within said load ring; and means to hold said sections in contact with each other.

6. A shipping container for a roll of merchandise comprising two relatively inverted sections to inclose a roll of merchandise within said sections; each section having a load ring permanently fixed in the outer end thereof, by means of metallic elements passing through said section and load ring and clinched within said load ring; and means to hold said sections in contact with each other.

7. A structure to protect and support the end of a rug rolled for shipment comprising a tube telescoped over the end of said rug and a load ring substantially conterminous with the end of said rug, said load ring being permanently fixed within said tube by means of metallic elements passing through said tube and load ring and clinched within said load ring.

' GEORGE T. I-IYNES. GORDON S. SMITH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3147681 *May 17, 1961Sep 8, 1964Graflex IncCassette for photographic cameras
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/407
International ClassificationB65D85/671, B65D85/67
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/671
European ClassificationB65D85/671