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Publication numberUS2030541 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 11, 1936
Filing dateMar 19, 1935
Priority dateJan 22, 1934
Publication numberUS 2030541 A, US 2030541A, US-A-2030541, US2030541 A, US2030541A
InventorsGerman Rose Alfred
Original AssigneeRose Brothers Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for delivering powdery material
US 2030541 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 11, 1936. A. G. ROSE 2,030,541

APPARATUS FOR DELIVERING POWDERY MATERIAL Filed March 19, 1955 6 Sheets-Sheet l Feb. 11, 1936. A. G. ROSE ,0 1

APPARATUS FOR DELIVERING FOWDERY MATERIAL Filed March 19, 1935 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 llllll lllll llllll 11 INVENTOR Fe. 11, 1936. A. G. ROSE APPARATUS FOR DELIVERING POWDERY MATERIAL Filed March 19, 1935 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR Patented Feb. 11, 1936 PATENT OFFICE APPARATUS FOR DELIVERING POWDERY MATERIAL Alfred German Rose, Gainsborough, England, assignor to Rose Brothers (Gainsborough) Limited, Gainsborough, E

ngland, a British company Application March 19, 1935, Serial No. 11,818 In Great Britain January 22, 1934 2 Claims.

This application corresponds to the application of Alfred German Rose and Rose Bros, (Gainsborough) Ltd., Serial No. 2,111/34, which was filed in Great Britain on January 22, 1934.

This invention relates to apparatus for delivering measured quantities of granular, pulverulent or like fluent solid materials (hereinafter referred to as powder) into containers, for example into bags, cartons and the like.

According to the present invention the appatus; for delivering measured quantities of powder into containers comprises the combination with a hopper, means for feeding a stream of powder from the hopper continuously at a regulated rate, and separating means operable to direct the stream of powder into each of a succession of containers in turn for the same predetermined period without interrupting the flow of the powder.

According to a feature of this invention the separating means comprises a series of delivery funnels, means for moving them in succession through the stream of powder and container feeding means operable to move a container, in reg- 5 ister with the lower end of each funnel, with the funnel while it moves through the stream of powder. It is a feature of this invention that the upper opening of each funnel is separated from the opening of the two adjacent funnels by a part whose upper edge is so thin that no powder can lodge thereon.

Preferably the container feeding means comprises a series of pockets each arranged below a separate funnel and means for moving the pockets in step with the funnels.

Conveniently the funnels are arranged in a circle on a wheel which is rotated continuously or intermittently to carry each funnel in turn through the stream of powder. The pockets may also be arranged in a circle on a wheel which is rotated in step with the wheel carrying the funnels.

According to a further feature of this invention the means for feeding the powder from the hop- 45 per comprises a wheel mounted in an opening in the bottom of the hopper and rotatable to feed a stream of powder from the hopper. Preferably means is provided for loosening the layer of powder on the feeding wheel in order to prevent it adhering thereto.

A preferred embodiment of the present invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference tothe accompanying drawings in which:

means of a feeding wheel or drum I I which is secured to a continuously rotating shaft I2. The drum is provided with two flanges I3 which fit against the lower edges 14 of the side walls of the hopper. An extension l5 of the bottom of the hopper fits snugly between the flanges l3 and against the annular surface of the feed wheel I l.

The feed wheel ll thus closes an opening in the bottom of the hopper except at I6 where an opening is formed through which a. stream of powder I1 is fed by the wheel II. The size of the opening I6 can be varied by means of a sluicegate H! which is mounted for vertical movement in guides 20. The gate l9 can be adjusted by means of a screw 2| which is engaged with a nut 22 secured on the gate. The thickness of the stream ll of powder can be adjusted by varying the height of the gate I9.

The weight of the powder in hopper l0 compresses the powder at the bottom of the hopper so that the stream of powder lying between flanges I3 of the drum is packed and tends to adhere to the surfaces of the drum. Accordingly means is provided for loosening the stream of powder so that it may fall freely into a feed chute 23. The loosening means is arranged as follows. A drum 24 is mounted to rotate parallel to the drum H and is provided with a plurality of radial spikes 25. The drum 24 is spaced 2. sufficient distance from the sluice-gate l9, so there will be a stream of the packed powder on the feed wheel ll, between the gate l9 and the point of contact of the spikes, whereby all danger of the powder being drawn from the hopper by the spikes is avoided. A gear wheel 26 is secured to the drum 24 and meshes with a gear wheel 2'! which rotates with the feeding drum H. The gear ratio is such that the spiked drum 24 rotates at a higher speed than the feeding drum l l. The spikes 25 are thus moved through the stream of powder at the; feeding drum and loosen it directing it into the feed chute 23.

The powder is delivered by the chute 23 on to a separating device which comprises a wheel 28 mounted to turn about a vertical axis and formed with a plurality of delivery funnels 29 arranged in a circle at its periphery (see Figure 3). The upper openings of the funnels 29 are separated by a partition 30 (Figure 2), the upper edge 3| of which is so sharp that no powder can rest on it. A wheel 28 is secured to a shaft 32 which is rotated, continuously or intermittently, so that each funnel 29 registers with the chute 23 in turn for a predetermined constant period. Since the powder is being fed from the hopper at a constant rate, a constant quantity of powder will pass down through each funnel. A rectangular pocket 33 is arranged immediately below each of the funnels 29. The pockets 33 are arranged in a circle around the periphery of a wheel 34 which is also secured to the shaft 32. A bag or carton 35 is inserted, by suitable mechanism not shown, to each pocket. Each bag is thus carried round by its pocket and lies immediately below one of the funnels 29. The bags are supported by means of a table 36.

As each funnel 29 passes beneath the chute 23 a measured quantity of powder is delivered into it. This powder passes down through it into its bag so that each bag receives a predetermined quantity of powder. After the bag has been filled it is removed from its pocket in any suitable manner not shown.

I claim:

1. In an apparatus for delivering solid material, a hopper for containing bulk material having an opening in the bottom thereof, a feed wheel rotatable in said opening to feed a uniform stream of material from the hopper continuously and at a constant rate, means for Varying the depth of said stream, means for receiving the fed stream, and. rotary means having projections thereon between the hopper and the means for receiving the stream. for continuously breaking up the stream after the stream has left the hopper, there being an unbroken portion of the stream on the feed wheel between the hopper and the breaking up means.

2. In an apparatus for delivering solid material, a hopper for containing bulk material having an opening in the bottom thereof, a feed wheel rotatable in said opening to feed a uniform stream of material from the hopper continuously and at a constant rate, means for varying the depth of said stream, means for receiving the fed stream, and a material-loosening means between the hopper and the means for H ALFRED GERMAN ROSE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2532584 *Mar 28, 1945Dec 5, 1950Vagim Edward JFeeding device for nonfree-flowing materials in bulk with adjustable flow control plate and elongated handle therefor
US2631768 *Dec 27, 1949Mar 17, 1953Dole Eng Co JamesFilling apparatus and method
US2643032 *Sep 30, 1949Jun 23, 1953Virkotype CorpPowder dispenser and distributor
US2882937 *Jan 7, 1957Apr 21, 1959Rose Brothers LtdFeeding of powder or other fluent materials in substantially equal quantities
US2932329 *Jul 11, 1958Apr 12, 1960Ludwig John HApparatus for filling cartons with cottage cheese and the like
US2963229 *Jun 10, 1955Dec 6, 1960Jeffrey Mfg CoGarbage grinder feeder
US3369577 *Dec 31, 1964Feb 20, 1968Bartelt Engineering Co IncMechanism for dispensing measured amounts of fluent material
US3580301 *Aug 15, 1968May 25, 1971Damon CorpContinuous flow liquid distributing system
US4010778 *Jan 10, 1973Mar 8, 1977Aggen Alvin FAutomatic seed planting machine and method for planting seeds in planters
US4240569 *Jul 3, 1978Dec 23, 1980Clarke-Gravely CorporationCarpet cleaning powder dispenser
US4288008 *Nov 19, 1979Sep 8, 1981Amblard JAgricultural spreader device of modular design for pulverulent material
US5307952 *Sep 22, 1992May 3, 1994Turfco Manufacturing IncorporatedTop dresser
US5478104 *May 2, 1994Dec 26, 1995Turfco Manufacturing, IncorporatedCantilevered leaf spring assembly
US5802994 *Jul 3, 1996Sep 8, 1998Turfco Manufacturing IncorporatedSeeder apparatus for dispensing seed with or without top dressing
US6024033 *Sep 4, 1998Feb 15, 2000Turfco Manufacturing, Inc.Seeder apparatus for dispensing seed with or without top dressing
US6058860 *Sep 4, 1998May 9, 2000Turfco Manufacturing IncorporatedSeeder apparatus for dispensing seed with or without top dressing
US6523726 *May 26, 2000Feb 25, 2003Imperial Technologies, Inc.Apparatus and method for controlled feeding of particulate material
DE1148484B *Aug 29, 1958May 9, 1963Fmc CorpMit grosser Geschwindigkeit arbeitende Abfuelleinrichtung fuer koernige Gueter
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/238, 222/314, 141/131, 222/311, 406/135, 406/62, 222/342, 222/410
International ClassificationG01F13/00
Cooperative ClassificationG01F13/001
European ClassificationG01F13/00B