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Publication numberUS2030922 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1936
Filing dateJan 28, 1935
Priority dateJan 28, 1935
Publication numberUS 2030922 A, US 2030922A, US-A-2030922, US2030922 A, US2030922A
InventorsHirth Richard B
Original AssigneeHirth Richard B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carburetor
US 2030922 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1936. R. B. HlRTH CARBURETOR Filed Jan. 28, 1935 ATTORNEY.

O O O O O O O W 0 0 m 0 O W 0000000 h I i 0. wwwmwwwa f 4 %& 0 F 0 0000000 0000000 6 O 3 M Q 4/ 1 0 F O W L 0 O O O O O O O O FJ m 00000000000000 0 0 0 0 0 0 m 3 7 :1; O M j 0 9 0 N a w 0 O 0 O 0 00 N 3 0% W O W \6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00000000000000 Patented Feb. 18, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 7 Claims.

This invention relates in general to the art of internal combustion engines and relates specifically to improvements in carburetor or fuel mixing devices for such engines.

An object of the invention is to providea carburetor in which an intimate mixture of air and volatile liquid fuel is attained, to assure a proper charge of combustible mixture and a more complete combustion of the mixture, and that'a high percentage of the B. t. u. value of thevolatile liquid fuel may be used in the'form of heat in the engine.

Another object of the invention is to provide -a carburetor in which air is introduced or inducted at a multiplicity of points adjacent the bottom of the liquid fuel column, and escapes upwardly in the" said column in small globules.

Another object of the invention is to provide for the initial upward escape, to absorb gas, within the liquid fuel column, of the inducted air laterally away from the corresponding points of its induction, by directing it through abafile plate having smaller openings than the induction open- Ings.

Another object of the invention is to ensure separation of liquid, and proper mixing of the inducted air, now having a certain gas content, as said air leaves the liquid fuel column, by providing for the upward movement thereof, into the mixing chamber in a lateral direction opposed to the lateral direction of the initial upward escape of the inducted air within the liquid fuel, by directing same through a bafiie plate having small openings similar to the openings of the baflie plate described in the preceding paragraph.

Another object of the invention is to provide means whereby atmospheric air may be admitted in controllable quantities into the mixing chamber and therein mingled with and mixed with the gaseous mixture described in the preceding paragraph, by directing both the air and the gaseous mixture through further baflle means having lateral escape openings.

A'further object of the invention is to provide additional baflie means located just ahead of the outlet of the carburetor, and having openings to secure'a lateral flow into the outlet, of the gaseousfuel'mixture resulting as described in the preceding paragraph.

Another object of the invention is to provide the carburetor with means for maintaining a constant head or column of volatile liquid fuel at the bottom thereof.

Other objects'and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from a consideration of the detailed description hereinafter found in this-specification when taken in connection'with the accompanying drawing wherein a preferred embodiment of'the invention is shown and on which like characters of reference refer to similar parts or elements in all of the several views.

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of a carburetor embodying the invention, parts being broken away for'purposes of illustration, as viewed from line 1-1 of Fig. '2.

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken on line IIII of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 3 is a horizontal, transverse sectional view taken on line IIIIII of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig.4 is-a horizontal, transverse sectional view taken on line'IVIV of'Fig. 1, looking in the direction'of the arrows.

Fig. .5 is a fragmentary, horizontal sectional view taken on line V-V of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows.

The carburetor or volatile liquid fuel mixing device of this invention includes a container l which may be in the form of a rectangular box and is constructed ofa material capable-of holding and confining a volatile liquid fuel 2.

Air is introduced or inducted into the liquid fuel 2 by means :of a multiplicity of 'tubes 3. In order to induct thezair adjacent the bottom of the liquid fuel column, these tubes 3 terminate at their inner-ends near the bottom of the container l. The number of these tubes, having small diameter bores to provide for the formation and escape of small globules of air in the liquid fuel, as depicted in Fig. 1, is determined closely with respect to the area of the outlet 4 of the carburetor. That is the total cross-sectional flow area of the tubes 3 should be approximately that of the cross-sectional flow area of the outlet 4. The tubes 3 are preferably distributed adjacent the boundary of the container, to cooperate with other elements and arrangement of these elements, in "a manner later to be more fully described.

A baflle plate 5 provided with bores to receive the tubes'3 may be secured, in a horizontal transverse direction within the container l, by any desired means. This plate 5 is located within the column of liquid fuel and is removed upwardly of the plane determined by the points of induction of the air, so as to divide the liquid fuelcolumn. With' the tubes 3 arranged adjacent the boundary of the container I, as shown, the plate 5 is in accordance with this invention, provided with the required number of openings 6, preferably smaller than the flow areas of the tubes 3, and arranged in concentrated manner about the center of the plate. The total area of flow of the openings 6 should likewise approximate the flow area of the outlet 4.

The container I is provided with another baffle plate 1 located above the surface of the liquid fuel 2 and mounted in a horizontal transverse direction within the container and secured therein by any desired means. With the tubes 3 arranged adjacent the boundary of the container l and in accordance with such arrangement, the openings 6 located centrally of the plate 5, as described, the plate I in accordance with this invention is provided with openings 8 distributed adjacent the boundary of the container I. These openings 8 may correspond in size and number, approximately to the: size and number of the openings 6. The arrangement of the location of the tubes 3, openings G and openings 8, provides for considerable lateral deflections of the inducted air within the liquid fuel, and of the gaseous mixture within the mixing chamber located above the surface of the liquid fuel 2, for accomplishing absorption of gas and desired preliminary mixing of the air inducted and liquid fuel.

For convenience the plate I may be said to provide a lower mixing chamber 9 and an'upper mixing chamber l0. 7

Controllable quantities of air as and when additionally needed, may be admitted into the upper mixing chamber ID by means of an automatic air valve ll registering with an opening in the top of the container l. The air valve ll may have its circular base l2 provided with a seat for the poppet l3. The circular base 12 united by arms l4 to a central hub portion-l5, may be employed to secure the air valve in registration with the opening in the container I, by means such as bolts, not shown. The hub portion I5 is provided with internal threads to receive a similarly threaded adjusting sleeve IS. A spring I1, engages the poppet l3 and an annular collar on the sleeve [6. The amount of suction in the upper mixing chamber determines, for any given initial compression of the spring H, the amount of opening of the air valve and hence the quantity of additional air admitted. The stem of the poppet l3 sliding in the bore of the adjusting sleeve l6 provides for the opening and closing of the air valve. A given adjustment of the compression of the spring I! may be retained by a nut l8 threaded on one end of the sleeve l6, and urged against the hub portion 15;

The upper mixing chamber in order to enhance the mixing of air and gas, is further provided with baiiie plate means l9 extending from the top of the container l to the plate 1. The plate means l9 may provide an enclosure surrounding the mouth of the outlet 4, and in-this case may be constituted by four walls arranged at right angles. The plate means I!) is provided with the required number of small size openings 25, preferably located adjacent the plate 1, for effecting further mixing of the air and the already formed mixture and for providing lateral movement,

tending to enhance further mixing action, of the resulting mixture.

The mixture thus moving at points adjacent the plate 1 into the space within the confines of the plate means [9, is in said space required to move upwardly involving another deflection and providing additional mixing action. And in order to again laterally direct the vertically rising mixture an additional baflie and separator means 20 is provided just ahead of the outlet 4. The means 20 may take the form of a box closed at its lower end, and having its walls provided with the required number of small openings 26 for separating any liquid from the intimate mixture at this point and for securing a desired lateral direction of the said mixture while passing into the outlet 4, for burning in the engine.

- The constant height of the column of liquid fuel may be attained by hinging a float 2| to a member secured to the under side of the plate 1. The hinged float may carry a valve element 22 movable as the float tends to drop and rise, out of seating and into seating position with relation to a companion valve element 23 formed in connection with the inner end of a liquid fuel supply pipe 24.

The operation of the carburetor, for accomplishing the intimate mixing of the liquid fuel and air, from the description thereof above given seems clear and briefly stated is as follows:

The air inducted through the tubes 3 is split up in small globules. These rise, in their initial escape through the liquid fuel, in directions laterally away from their points of formation, to assure proper and desired absorption of gas from the liquid fuel. Mixing and splitting up of these globules of air and absorbed gas is effected by passing through the openings 6. From these openings 6 these globules, now reduced in size move laterally and upwardly within the remaining height of the fuel column to absorb additional gas and they continue to move in the lateral direction as they enter the mixing chamber. After escaping through the openings 8 positioned with respect to the openings 6 to secure the lateral movement, just described, within the mixing chamber, the mixture of a certain gas content at this point is, when the air valve H is open, further mixed with air and intermingled with itself by being required to move laterally through the openings 25 in the bafiie plate means l9. Thereupon further upward rising pursues with lateral deflection to effect further mixing. The intimate mixture of the gaseous mixture is flnally secured and completed by again laterally directing the gaseous mixture, by requiring it to pass through openings 26 in the bafile and separator means 20 located just ahead of the outlet 4.

Incidental to the intimate mixing which occurs in the carburetor, it is here pointed out, that a desirable washing of the inducted air occurs by reason of the fact that it is split up into small globules, that it moves in a liquid and in its upward escape through the liquid is deflected for incidental extended washing and separating action therein. Further separation of any entrained solid matter tends to occur as it passes through the perforations 6 reducing the size of the washed globules.

It is to be understood that it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact details of construction herein shown and described, for various modifications within the scope of the appended claims may occur to persons skilled in the art to which the invention appertains.

It is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent.

1. In a carburetor, a container for confining a liquid fuel, means for introducing atmospheric air adjacent the bottom of the liquid fuel column 7 confined within said container, means for supplying controllable quantities of air above the liquid fuel, an outlet for the resulting fuel mixture located at the top of said container, baflie means between said controllable air supply means and said outlet, baii'le means in the body of liquid fuel, balile means above the level of the liquid fuel, said latter two baffle means respectively constructed to provide paths of flow toward and away from the vertical center-line of the con tainer, and further baflle means between the outlet and each of said former bafile means.

2. In a carburetor, a container for confining a liquid fuel, distributed means for introducing atmospheric air adjacent the bottom of the liquid fuel column confined within said container, means for supplying controllable quantities of air above the liquid fuel, an outlet for the resulting fuel mixture located at the top of said container, bafiie means between said controllable air supply means and said outlet, baflie means in the body of liquid fuel, baiile means above the level of the liquid fuel, said latter two baffle means respectively constructed to provide paths of flow toward and away from the vertical center-line of the container, and further baiile means between the outlet and each of said former baflie means.

3. In a carburetor, a container for confining a liquid fuel, distributed means for introducing atmospheric air adjacent the bottom of the liquid fuel column confined within said container, means for supplying controllable quantities of air above the liquid fuel, an outlet for resulting fuel mixture located at the top of said container, baifie means between said controllable air supply means and said outlet, perforated means located within the body of liquid fuel and providing for the initial upward escape of the introduced air laterally of its points of introduction into the liquid fuel column, perforated means located above the liquid fuel column and providing for the upward movement of the mixture of fuel and air in a lateral direction opposite from that of the initial upward escape of the introduced air, and further baflie means between the outlet and said former baflie means and said perforated means.

4. In a carburetor, a container for confining a liquid fuel, distributed means for introducing atmospheric air adjacent the bottom of the liquid fuel column confined within said container, means for supplying controllable quantities of air above the liquid fuel, an outlet for the resulting fuel mixture located at the top of said container, transverse means in said container for dividing the liquid fuel column, said means provided with openings for the initial upward escape of the introduced air laterally of its points of introduction into the liquid fuel, transverse means in said container for dividing the mixing space above the liquid fuel column, said means provided with openings for the upward movement of the mixture of fuel and air in a lateral direction opposite from the direction of initial upward escape of the introduced air while within the liquid fuel column, and baflie means between the means for supplying the controllable quan tities of air and said outlet.

5. A carburetor as claimed in claim 4, having further separator and mixing means located within the container ahead of the outlet.

6. In a carburetor, a container for confining a liquid fuel, means comprising a multiplicity of small bore tubular members for introducing atmospheric air adjacent the bottom of the liquid fuel column confined within said container, means for supplying controllable quantities of air above the liquid fuel, an outlet for the resulting mixture located at the top of said container, transverse means in said container for dividing the liquid fuel column, said means provided with openings for the initial upward escape of the introduced air laterally of its points of introduction in the liquid fuel, transverse means in said container for dividing the mixing space above the liquid fuel column, said means provided with openings for the upward movement of the mixture of air and fuel in a lateral direction opposite from the direction of the initial upward escape of the introduced air while within the liquid fuel column, and baflie means between the means for supplying the controllable quantities of air and said outlet.

7. In a carburetor, a container for confining a liquid fuel, means comprising a multiplicity of small bore tubular members for introducing atmospheric air adjacent the bottom of the liquid fuel column confined within said container, means for supplying controllable quantities of air above the liquid fuel, an outlet for the resulting fuel mixture located at the top of said container, transverse means in said container for dividing the liquid fuel column, said means provided with openings for the initial upward escape of the introduced air laterally of its points of introduction in the liquid fuel, transverse means in said container for dividing the mixing space above the liquid fuel column, said means provided with openings for the upward movement of the mixture of air and fuel in a lateral direction opposite from the direction of the initial upward escape of the introduced air while within the liquid fuel column, baffie means between the means for supplying the controllable quantities of air and said outlet, and further separator and mixing means located within the container ahead of said outlet and providing for the lateral flow of the fuel mixture into the outlet.

RICHARD B. HIRTH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2586187 *Mar 2, 1950Feb 19, 1952Lawrence H StahlMotive fuel converter
US6746002 *May 3, 2002Jun 8, 2004Thomas R. JonesFuel expansion system
WO2002090748A1 *May 3, 2002Nov 14, 2002Thomas R JonesFuel expansion system
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/124
International ClassificationF02M17/00, F02M17/22
Cooperative ClassificationF02M17/22
European ClassificationF02M17/22