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Publication numberUS2030957 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1936
Filing dateDec 29, 1933
Priority dateDec 26, 1931
Also published asUS2049099
Publication numberUS 2030957 A, US 2030957A, US-A-2030957, US2030957 A, US2030957A
InventorsClaude Andre, Bethenod Joseph
Original AssigneeEts Claude Paz & Silva
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electromagnetic apparatus
US 2030957 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 18, 1936. .1. BETHENOD ET'AL 7 ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS Filed Dec. 29, 1933 ATTOR/YEX v f Patented Feb. 18, 1936 ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS Joseph Bethenod, Paris, and Andre Claude, Nanterre, France, assignors to Socit Anonyme pour les Applications de lElectricite & des Gaz Hares Etablissements Claude-Paz & Silva,

a corporation oi France Applicatiollin December 29, 1933, Serial No. 704,558

Germany January 9, 1933 The capital importance of a considerable current density for the production of ultra-violet and luminous radiations of adjustable composition has already been pointed out in the prior U. S. A. patent application No. 618,402, filed June V 20, 1932. When rare gases, such as krypton and xenon, are acted upon by electro-magnetic induction, this considerable density is obviously an increasing function of the rate of variation of the magnetic field in each point of the envelope. According to the present invention, the necessary rate for variation may be attained with currents of a frequency not exceeding that which may be produced industrially by an alternator, say about 30,000 cycles per second, provided that conditions are so arranged to obtain a magnetic field of sufficient amplitude.

At any rate, the invention will be well understood with the aid of the accompanying drawing, wherein Figures 1 and 2 are diagrammatic. views showing arrangements of the type under consideration.

In Figure 1, the spherical vessel I is shown provided with a cylindrical casing 2 which penetrates into the interior and forms a gas-tight housing for a coil 3, the terminals 4 of which are connected to a source of high-frequency current,

such as an alternator, a triode generator or the like. Experiment shows that the desired efiectis thus obtained under excellent conditions. According to one of the features of the invention, these conditions are still further improved by disposing within the coil 3, a core 5 of magnetic substance, formed for example of strips of thin sheet iron (placed radially) or by wires of very small diameter, with a view to reducing, in known manner, the eddy current losses. point of view, it is of advantage to make the said magnetic core of metal in the state of powder,

the grains of which are agglomerated by a suit- Experiment shows able insulating substance. that it is thus possible to attain, even at frequencies of the order of those employed in radiotelegraphy, an apparent permeability of at least '7 to 8 (the permeability of air being taken as unity), the losses remaining well within the acceptable limits.

In Figure 2, the inductance coil 3 is wound outside the vessel l, and this method may aiiord certain constructional advantages. Even with this arrangement, the adjunction of a ferro-magnetic core 5, preferably of iron in powder form, r is generally of considerable importance, as found experimentally. Qf course, it is necessary to fix From this the length and diameter according to each application. a Y

The curve of the magnetizing current as a. function of the time may depart, if desired, from the sinusoidal shape and in particular may assume a pointed shape, due to the presence of harmonies of an amplitude which, if necessary, is increased artificially by any known means (magnetic saturation, or the like).

Having now particularly described and ascer- 10 tained the nature of the said invention and in what manner it is to be performed, we' declare that what we claim is:

1. A process for the production of ultra-violet and luminous radiations of adjustable composition, comprising inductively exciting a gaseous atmosphere containing at least one rare gas by exciting an inductive winding with high frequency current, and increasing the current density in said atmosphere to. a value. sumciently' high to produce spark spectra by positioning a magnetic core in said winding and in said atmosphere.

2. An apparatus for producing ultra-violet and luminous radiations ofailjustable composition by electromagnetically exciting a gaseous atmosphere containing at least one rare gas, comprising an envelope containing the gaseous atmosphere, a cylindrical casing penetrating into the interior of the envelope, the inner end of said casing being closedto prevent communication between said envelope and casing, a magnetic core positioned in said casing, and a high frequency excited coil positioned in said casing and surrounding said core for setting up a magnetic field to induce current into said gaseous atmosphere.

3. An apparatus for producing ultra-violet and luminous radiations of adjustable composition by electromagnetically exciting a gaseous atmosphere containing at least one rare gas, comprising an envelope containing the gaseous atmosphere, a cylindrical casing penetrating into the interior of the envelope, the'inner end of said casing being closed to prevent communication be- ,tween said envelope and casing, a magnetic core positioned in said casing, and a high frequency excited coil. positioned exteriorly of said casing and surrounding said core and envelope for setting up a magnetic field to induce current into said-gaseous atmosphere.

4. An apparatus as set forth in claim 2, in which the-core is formed of strips of thin iron radially arranged.

5. An apparatus as set forth in claim 3, in

which the core is formed-oi strips of iron radially arranged.

6. "An apparatus as set forth claim 2, in which the core is formed of wires of very small diameter.

7. An apparatus as set iorth in claim 3, in which the ccreis formed oi wires of very small diameter.

8. An apparatus as set forth in claim 2, in which the core is formed of magnetic substances in the form of powder, the grains of which are agglomerated by means or an insulating substance.

9. An apparatus as set forth in claim'3, in which the core is iormed'oi magnetic substances in the form of powder, the grains of which are agglomerated by means of an insulating substance.

10. An apparatus for producing ultra-violet I and luminous radiations of adjustable composition by electromagnetically-excitinga gaseous atmosphere containing at least one rare gas, comprising an envelope containing the gaseous atmosphere, a high frequency exciting winding for inductively exciting the gas in said envelope,

and a magnetic core surrounded by said winding and the gaseous atmosphere for increasing the current density in the gaseous atmosphere to a value required for the production of spark spectra.

JOSEPH BEWOD. ANDRE CLAUDE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2465414 *Apr 4, 1946Mar 29, 1949Abshire Harold WGaseous discharge device
US2939048 *May 29, 1958May 31, 1960Plasmadyne CorpApparatus for creating extremely high temperatures
US2939049 *May 29, 1958May 31, 1960Plasmadyne CorpApparatus for generating high temperatures
US2953718 *May 1, 1958Sep 20, 1960Plasmadyne CorpApparatus and method for generating high temperatures
US3500118 *Jul 17, 1967Mar 10, 1970Gen ElectricElectrodeless gaseous electric discharge devices utilizing ferrite cores
US3521120 *Mar 20, 1968Jul 21, 1970Gen ElectricHigh frequency electrodeless fluorescent lamp assembly
US3987334 *Dec 18, 1975Oct 19, 1976General Electric CompanyIntegrally ballasted electrodeless fluorescent lamp
US3987335 *Dec 18, 1975Oct 19, 1976General Electric CompanyElectrodeless fluorescent lamp bulb RF power energized through magnetic core located partially within gas discharge space
US4005330 *Dec 18, 1975Jan 25, 1977General Electric CompanyElectrodeless fluorescent lamp
US4010400 *Aug 13, 1975Mar 1, 1977Hollister Donald DLight generation by an electrodeless fluorescent lamp
US4017764 *Dec 18, 1975Apr 12, 1977General Electric CompanyElectrodeless fluorescent lamp having a radio frequency gas discharge excited by a closed loop magnetic core
US5619103 *Jun 7, 1995Apr 8, 1997Wisconsin Alumni Research FoundationInductively coupled plasma generating devices
US5621266 *Oct 3, 1995Apr 15, 1997Matsushita Electric Works Research And Development Laboraty Inc.Electrodeless fluorescent lamp
US5723947 *Dec 20, 1996Mar 3, 1998Matsushita Electric Works Research & Development Laboratories Inc.Electrodeless inductively-coupled fluorescent lamp with improved cavity and tubulation
US6249090Jul 3, 1996Jun 19, 2001Matsushita Electric Works Research & Development Laboratories IncElectrodeless fluorescent lamp with spread induction coil
EP1150338A1 *Oct 12, 2000Oct 31, 2001Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Device for driving electrodeless discharge lamp
Classifications
U.S. Classification315/248, 313/607, 313/161, 313/155
International ClassificationH01J65/04, A61N5/06, H01J65/00, H05B41/232, H01J61/16
Cooperative ClassificationH01J65/048, H01J61/16, A61N5/06, H01J65/00, Y02B20/22, H05B41/232
European ClassificationA61N5/06, H01J65/00, H01J65/04A3, H05B41/232, H01J61/16