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Publication numberUS2031225 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1936
Filing dateOct 4, 1934
Priority dateOct 4, 1934
Publication numberUS 2031225 A, US 2031225A, US-A-2031225, US2031225 A, US2031225A
InventorsO'donnell Stella A
Original AssigneeO'donnell Stella A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Finishing stencil
US 2031225 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Feb. 18, 1936. s E 2,031,225

FINISHING STENCIL Patented Feb. 18, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

Claims.

This invention relates to a device adapted for use in manicuring and/or'pedicuring, and particularly in connection with the finishing of finger nails, so that some of the natural character- 5 istics of the regions proximate the cuticle, known as the moon, and the end of the nail, may be accentuated or separately and differently finished.

It is common practice in manicuring finger lo nails to employ a liquid polish or dye as distinguished from finishing the surface of the nails by means of bufling. In the use of liquid polish,

for instance, it is the practice to apply the liquid by means of a small brush or the like, and in do- 15 ing so it is found that the nails may be finished more attractively if the moon and end portions of the nails are not so treated. Accordingly, this practice has demonstrated the importance of one's dexterity in being able to apply the polish to the 20 body of the finger nail and leave a carefully defined finish line at the edge of the moon and end portion of the nail respectively.

Accordingly, an important object of my invention is to provide a device which may be securely 25 position over the moon and/or the end portion of the finger nail, so that the exposed portion or body of the finger nail may be properly finished to present the desired efiect in a shorter time and with greater facility than heretofore.

30 Another object of my invention is to provide a device through the use of which the shape of the moons and the tips of two or more nails may be similarly shaped or accentuated.

Other objects and advantages flowing from the 35 use and operation of my device will be specifically referred to hereinafter, or become apparent from the following description thereof written in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which Figure 1 illustrates a development or blank of 40 suitable material from which may be made one form of my finishing stencil.

Figures 2 and 3 illustrate a construction of the device when the blank shown in Figure 1 is finally formed.

4 Figures 4 and 5 illustrate plan and elevational views respectively of my device properly positioned at the end of a finger to enable the exposed portion of the finger nail to be finished as desired, and at the same time offering protection 50 to the moon portion of the finger nail.

Figures 6 and '1 illustrate a modified form of my device in which both the end of the nail and moon are protected so that liquid polish or dye may be applied to only the so-called body por- 66 tion of the nail.

Referring now to the drawing, and particularly to Figures 1 to 5 thereof, it will be seen that my stencilling device may be made from a blank of any suitable sheet material comprising in outline what may be described as a shield portion l0, 5

a removing tab or grip II, and side pieces l2-I2 and that the device as a whole may be formed in such a manner that the stencil may be properly positioned and secured to the end of a finger by means of the side pieces. 10 Figures 4 and 5 illustrate the manner in which the edge of the shield III is made to cover, what, for the want of a better name, may be described as the moon portion of the finger nail, and expose the remainder or body portion of the nail, such as illustrated by the numeral iii. The shield portion is held in proper position by means of the gripping action of the side pieces l2-i2 when they are suitably formed of more or less resilient ,material, see Figures 2 and 3.

It will be understood that when the device is so positioned on the finger and the exposed edge of the shield l0 fits closely against the surface of the finger nail, that the body portion H of the nail, may be treated as desired without also treating the moon portion of the nail. For instance, liquid nail polish may be applied to the finger nail with a brush, swab, or any other suitable device and because of the protection afforded by the contour of the shield portion ID, the moon portion of the nail will not be finished but instead will cause said finish to terminate at the edge thereof in a smooth regular line.

The device may be formed of paper, if desired, and preferably secured to the finger by means of any suitable adhesive applied to the inside surfaces of the side pieces l2-|2 in which case the tab II is used to catch hold of the device and remove the same from the finger after the finishing operation. It will be understood that ordinarily a paper stencil of this type, because of its comparative cheapness, would be used for but one application of the finishing material, and would thereafter be destroyed. I prefer, however, making my stencils of more permanent mate- 46 rial such as stainless steel, aluminum, celluloid or fibre, such that any finishing material which may accidentally or otherwise be applied thereto in the application of polish to the nail, may be readily removed or wiped off with any suitable sub- 50 stance, and thereby provide a stencil which may be used repeatedly without damage.

It will be understood that where the device is made of such more or less rigid and permanent material, the ends l4-I4 of the side pieces the P01151113 |2'l2 are made to project a short distance below the under surface of the finger, so that after face of 'a table or the like. and if need be, assisted by a rocking motion applied to the device when the tab H is pressed toward the top of the finger. If the device is removed this way, it may be lifted directly upwardly and away from the liquid polish before it is allowed to dry on the finger nail and leave a sharply defined line proximate the moon".

Referring now to Figures 6 and 7 it will be seen that I provide a modified form of device which in some respects is similar to that above described and for that reason comprises portions which for means of identification are correspondingly numbered. This form of device, however, is provided with an end shield portion 5 connected to the body of the stencil by means of sides l6|6 spaced from one another a distance equal the width of the finger nail. Figure 7 also illustrates that the shape of the openand sides I6 is such body of the nail throughout the entire width thereof, but cannot, because of the shields l0 and I5 above described, be appliedto either the moon" or the area at the end of the finger nail, see dotted line area I! of Figure 7.

While I have described what seems now to be accompanying drawing.

What is claimed is:

1. A nail stencil for use in manicuring or pedicuring to cover and protect the moon-shaped section of the nail which comprises a projecting portion at the forward end of the stencil to cover the said moon-shaped section of the nail, integral' side pieces for extending over the member portion place and a rearwardly extending portion whereby the said stencil may be readily removed.

2. A nail stencil for use in manicuring or pedicuring to cover and protect the moon-shaped section of the nail which comprises a projecting portion at the forward end of the stencil to cover the said moon-shaped section of the nail, integral side pieces for extending over the adjacent member portion for holding the said stencil in place, an end shield portion integral with the body portion of the stencil and leaving an opening to expose the body portion of the nail while protecting the end portion thereof and a rearwardly extending portion whereby the stencil may be readily removed.

3. A nail stencil for use in manicuring or pedicuring to cover and for holding said stencil in place,

said side pieces extending below the palm-side 01' the finger.

5. A nail stencil of use in a manicuring or unitary construction for pedicuring operation to moon-shaped section of ing of said resilient material.

STELLA A. O'DONNELL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2722224 *Jun 11, 1954Nov 1, 1955Lawrence R BlannDispenser for fingernail treating liquid
US2799282 *May 18, 1955Jul 16, 1957Slack Thomas SDevice for extending fingernails
US3245418 *Jan 24, 1964Apr 12, 1966Ben DinersteinShielding device for applying nail-hardening compositions to fingernails
US3382878 *Jul 29, 1964May 14, 1968Ben DinersteinShielding device for nail-hardening compositions
US3993084 *Nov 1, 1974Nov 23, 1976Carol CullenFingernail wrapper and method
US4157095 *Feb 1, 1978Jun 5, 1979Sweet Sandra SReinforced artificial fingernail
US4172461 *Nov 14, 1977Oct 30, 1979Pangburn William ENail form
US4577648 *Dec 19, 1979Mar 25, 1986Frances DinersteinFingernail shielding device
US4643208 *Nov 13, 1984Feb 17, 1987Amour Glenda KNail form for use in applying nail extension material
US4779632 *Sep 30, 1982Oct 25, 1988West Tec Industries, Inc.Method for constructing artificial fingernails
US4805645 *Jul 27, 1987Feb 21, 1989Jazco International, Inc.Two mode artificial nail
US4960587 *Mar 10, 1988Oct 2, 1990Joie RuckerMethod and apparatus for application of finger & toenail coatings
US5143100 *Oct 23, 1991Sep 1, 1992Mikako KawakamiManicure sheet
US5150726 *Oct 1, 1990Sep 29, 1992Joie RuckerMethod and apparatus for application of finger & toenail coatings
US5277205 *May 24, 1993Jan 11, 1994Fashion Nails, Inc.Method and apparatus for applying decoration to nails
US5316026 *Jun 18, 1992May 31, 1994Fashion Nails, Inc.Method and apparatus for applying decoration to nails
US5613507 *Sep 14, 1995Mar 25, 1997Superb SolutionsApparatus for creating sculptured nails
US5803094 *Sep 12, 1997Sep 8, 1998Becker; Jeffrey BruceArtificial fingernail attachment aid and method
US5960798 *Feb 26, 1998Oct 5, 1999Fashion Nails, Inc.Method and apparatus for creating art on an object such as a person's fingernail or toenail
US5988179 *Apr 8, 1998Nov 23, 1999Fashion Nails, Inc.Method and machine for creating nail art on person's digit
US6024099 *Aug 5, 1998Feb 15, 2000Fashion Nails, Inc.Apparatus for creating art on an object such as the nail of a person's digit or a golf ball and method for making same
US6029673 *Apr 2, 1999Feb 29, 2000Fashion Nails, Inc.Method and apparatus for creating art on a person's fingernail or toenail
US6189541Oct 13, 1999Feb 20, 2001Fashion Nails. Inc.Method and machine for creating nail art on person's digit
US7654268 *May 31, 2006Feb 2, 2010June CarpenterArtificial nail form
US8978668 *Nov 5, 2010Mar 17, 2015Rafael Loza CebrerosDevice for making artificial nails
US20070277840 *May 31, 2006Dec 6, 2007June CarpenterArtificial nail form
US20090241977 *Mar 28, 2008Oct 1, 2009Dawn Elizabeth CookApparatus and method for protecting fingers and toes during manicure work
US20110203602 *Feb 25, 2010Aug 25, 2011Au Thao TDelineating nail for nail treatment applications and method therefor
US20130220361 *Nov 5, 2010Aug 29, 2013Rafael Loza CebrerosDevice for making artificial nails
US20150083153 *Sep 4, 2014Mar 26, 2015Denise Lillian CliffordFrench manicure guide
US20150257507 *Mar 12, 2015Sep 17, 2015Helen J. ParklyGuard for nail painting
Classifications
U.S. Classification132/285, 433/136, 33/563, 101/127, 132/73
International ClassificationA45D29/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45D29/004
European ClassificationA45D29/00M