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Publication numberUS2031957 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 25, 1936
Filing dateMar 25, 1933
Priority dateApr 5, 1932
Publication numberUS 2031957 A, US 2031957A, US-A-2031957, US2031957 A, US2031957A
InventorsRobert Karlstrom Fredrik Johan
Original AssigneeElectrolux Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suction nozzle
US 2031957 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v Feb. 25, 1936. F. J. R. KARLSTRM SUCTION NOZZLE Filed March 25, 193.3

2 Sheets-Sheet l (y INVENTOR Feb- 25, 1935- `F. J. R. KARLSTRM 2,031,957

SUCTI ON NOZZLE Filed March 25, 1935 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTKgR 15.-, ATTORNEY Patented Feb. 25, 1936 SUCTION NQZZLE Sweden. amig-nor to Dover,

Stockholm, Electrolux Corporation,

Del., a corporation oi* Delaware Appucaan Maren z5, 193s. saai N0. seas-1s In Germany 23Cldma.

My invention relates to the vacuum cleaning art and particularly to' an improved suction nozzle.

The object of my invention is to provide a. suction nozzle having an agitator member operated solely by the action of the air drawn through the nozzle and having no mechanical connection with `the motor of the vacuum cleaner. In accordance with my invention I produce vibrations due to ow of air and preferably set up pulsations in the iiow of air through the nozzle and mount an agitator member within the nozzle in such manner that it may be moved by the vibrations or pulsations.

Further objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent from the following description considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this specication and of which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view, partially in cross-section, of one embodiment of my invention;

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1, and showing, in addition, the nozzle connected to a vacuum cleaner unit;

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 4 4 of Fig. l;

Fig. 5 is an elevational view of a portion'of the nozzle shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of my invention; and

- threaded recesses in the part i5.

Fig. '7 is a cross-sectional view of a third embodiment of my invention.

Referring more particularly to Figs. 1 to 5, reference character I designates generally a ,suction nozzle adapted to be connected by means of a rigid hollow handle member II and a flexible hose I2 or the like to a suitable source of suction, such as the vacuum cleaner unit I3, containing the usual dust bag, fan and motor (see, for example, U. S. Patent No. 1,860,885 to Bilde dated May 31, 1932).

Nozzle Ill comprises a casing formed by an upper part I4 and a lower part I5. The nozzle is elongated, as appears from Fig. l, and the parts I4 and I5 are hinged together along one side by the hinges I6. The other side of the parts may be secured together by bolts I1 passing through openings in the part I4 and engaging The lower edges of part I define an elongated mouth or inlet opening or suction opening I8 which is adapted to be passed over the member or surface, such as a rug, which is to be cleaned. The edges April 5, 1982 dening the inlet opening have grooves I9 formed therein, which grooves have a maximum depth at their inner ends and a minimum depth, which may be zero, at their outer ends.

Part ii is formed with an inwardly extending 5 ilange 2l. Secured to iiange 2B by means of screws 2| is a strip oi metal or the like 22, the inneredgeof whichisformedas aninverted U 22. .A diaphragm 24 of flexible, and preferably though not necessarily resilient material, such 1( as rubber, is formed with a ridge 25 around its outer edge and this ridge is adapted to be engaged by the inverted U portion 23 and clamped between it and the ange 20. Diaphragm 24 has an elongated shape corresponding to that o! the nozzle 15 and has a similar. but smaller, elongated opening in the center thereof. 'I'he diaphragm is formed with a ridge 26 around its inner edge, which ridge is engaged by the U-shaped portion of a member 21. Member 21 is secured by screws 20 to a iiange 28 formed on an agitator member Agitator member 3B comprises an elongated member having depending sides 8| connected by an arched portion 32 through the upper part 25 of which is formed an elongated opening 33. Resilient means, such as leaf springs 34, are secured to either end of agitator member and to ilange 28 of the casing. Springs 34 are adapted to support the agitator member within the casing so 30 that the lower edge thereof is slightly above the plane of the inlet opening, as dened by the lower edges of the part I5. It will be noted that the diaphragm 24 and agitator member 30 divide the casing I0 into a lower chamber and an upper 35 chamber, communication between which is established through opening 33.

Upper part I4 of the casing I0 is formed with a hollow projecting portion 35 which is in part formed with a cylindrical outer surface. An outlet opening 38 extends through the cylindrical portion of projection 35. A coupling member 31 is pivotally secured to projection 35 by means of plates M and bolts 38. Coupling member 31 is formed in part with a cylindrical inner surface which is adapted to engage the cylindrical outer surface of projection 35. Thus, the coupling member 31 and the rigid handle member Il inserted therein may be pivoted about the nozzle I0 in order to use the nozzle under low furniture 50 without tilting the mouth-piece on the surface being cleaned. If desired, the construction may f be such that, if the coupling member 31 is pivoted iar enough, it will vary the eilective size of the opening 3B, or if pivoted still further, will un- 65 cover a portion of the opening 38 to the atmosphere, thus breaking the suction in the nozzle.

Secured within the upper part I4 of the nozzle by means of screws 40 is a' pulsation member 4I comprising a piece o1' resilient material, preterably metallic, having its one end secured to the casing and its other end free and disposed across the lower open end of projection 35. Pulsation member 4I'is so dimensioned and located that, when in unstressed condition, it substantially closes the lower end of hollow projection 35, but may be drawn into the projection whereupon the lower end of the outlet passage provided by the hollow projection is opened more or less.

The operation of this embodiment of my invention is as follows:

When the suction nozzle is connected to vacuum cleaner unit by means of the hollow handle I I and hose I2, andthe fan of the vacuum cleaner is operated, air is caused to iiow into the lower chamber of the nozzle through the elongated inlet opening bounded by the edges I8, through the opening 33 in the agitator member 30 into the upper chamber and thence into the hollow projection 35 and through the outlet opening 36 into the coupling member 31 from whence the air passes through the handle II and. hose I2 to the vacuum cleaner unit. If the mouth of the nozzle is passed`over a dusty surface, this air will pick up and carry with it particles of dust, thus cleaning the surface.

In order for the air to pass into the hollowprojection 35 it must deform the pulsation member to some position as is shown in dot and dash lines. In doing this the pulsation member is stressed while at the same time the air pressure tending to deform it is reduced, due to the increased size of the flow opening controlled by the pulsation member, whereupon the pulsation member springs back toward its unstressed position, thus again closing the ow opening. 'I'hus the pulsation member vibrates back and forth in the air stream passing through the nozzle. This vibration sets up impulses in the air stream, whichA impulses act upon the diaphragm 24 to cause it to oscillate. 'I'his oscillation of the diaphragm causes the resiliently supported agitator member 30 to oscillate up and down, whereupon the agitator member strikes the surface being cleaned and thus dislodges dirt adhering thereto.`

'Ihe dirt thus dislodged is readily picked upv by the air stream and carried to the dust separatorv ment the part I4 of the nozzle is formed with one or more auxiliary openings 45 through the top thereof. Pulsation member 4I is secured within the part I4 so as to be disposed in the path of air iiow through the openings 45. The other parts of the nozzle are similar to those shown in Figs. l to 5, except that the construction of the diaphragm 24 and the means for securing it to the casing and the agitator have been modied. As is shown, the outer edge of the diaphragm is clamped directly between the upper part I4 andthe lower part I5 of the nozzie, while the inner edge of the diaphragm is engaged within a slot formed in ange 29 of the.

therethrough. This air is admitted into-the nozzle through the mouth deilned by the lower edge I8 of the part I5 from whence it passes through the opening 33 in the agitator member into the upper chamber. Air is also drawn in through the auxiliary openings 45 and cause the pulsation member 4I to vibrate. This vibration causes pulsations in the air within the upper chamber, which pulsations cause the agitator member to osciilate up and down, thus striking the surface being cleaned and dislodging dust therefrom.

The nozzle shown in Fig. 6 is particularly well adapted for cleaning heavy carpets or the like which oiIer a large resistance to the ow of air into the mouth-piece opening. This resistance may be great enough to prevent sumcient iiow of air into a nozzle of the type shown in Figs. 1 to 5 to operate the pulsation member. In the nozzle shown in Fig. 6 the pulsation member is operated by a flow of air which is independent of the flow through the mouth-piece.

'I'he nozzle shown in Fig. '1 is generally similar to that shown in Figs. 1 through 5 with the exception that additional auxiliary openings 46 are formed in the lower part I5 of the nozzle, and establish communication between the atmosphere and the lower chamber. Pulsation members 41 are secured within the nozzle in the path of ow of air through auxiliary openings 46.

This nozzle has the same advantages as that shown in Fig. 6, that is, that the air for operating the pulsation member or members is independent of the air flow through the suction opening. In addition, the air drawn into the auxiliary openings 46 passes into the lower chamber adjacent to the suction opening, thus causing turbulence therein and aiding in picking up dust from the surfacebeing cleaned.

In addition to the pulsation members 41 there is shown in Fig. 7 a-pulsation member 4I arrangedin the same position as in Figs. 1 to 5. 'Ihe reason for this is that, if the nozzle is used forcleaning rugs or material having a very loose :weave offering but little resistance to the flow of air into the mouth piece, there may not be sutilcient flow through the openings 45 to actuate the pulsation members 41. In this event, the large tion member 4I. Hence, the nozzle .shown in Fig. 'I may be used,advantageously with rugs or the material to be cleaned which oiers either a high or low or any intermediate resistance to the ilow of air.

It is preferable that, in all of the modifications, the pulsation member be so chosen with respect to the diaphragm and agitator member that they will have similar periods of vibration so that the pulsation member and the agitator member will tend to vibrate or oscillate in phase with each other.

" While I have disclosed my invention in connection with a suction nozzle adapted to be connected to the source of suction by means of a flexible hose or the like, it is obvious that my invention may be employed in connection withV a nozzle which is integral with,l or rigidly secured to, the rest of the vacuum cleaner. 'I'he embodiments herein described have been chosen for purpose oi' illustration only and are not to be considered as limiting the scope of my invention, which is to be determined by the appended claims viewed in the light of the prior art. `l

What I claim is:

1. A suction nozzle comprising a hollow mem-v ber having an intake opening and an opening adapted to be connected to a source oi suction,

ow of air through the nozzle will actuate pulsaan agitator member movablymounted with respect to said hollow member and movable due to variations of ow of air in said hollow member, and means separate from the agitator operative by now of air through the hollow member for producing said variations of ilow of air in said hollow member to cause movement of said agitator member.

2. A suction nozzle comprising arhollow member having an intake opening and an opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, an agitator member movably mounted with respect to said hollow member and movable in a plurality of directions due to variations of ilow of air ilowing in one direction in said hollow member, and means separate from the agitator operative by now of air through the hollow member for producing said variations of flow of air in said hollow member to cause movement of said agitator member.

3. A suction nozzle including a hollow member having an intake opening adapted to be connectedto a source of suction, an agitator member mo-vably mounted in said hollow member and movable due to variations of ow of air in said hollow member, and vibratory means separate from said agitator member operative by flow of air through the hollow member for producing said variations of ow of air in said hollow member to cause movement of said agitator member.

4. In a suction nozzle, a casing having an intake opening and having an opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, means within said casing for causing varying air movement therein, and agitating means separate from the first-mentioned means in said casing adjacent to the intake opening operable by said varying air movement.

5. In a suction nozzle, a casing having an intake opening and having an opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, means within said casing operable byl flow of air therein for causing pulsations in said flow, and agitating means separate from the first-mentioned means in said casing adjacent to the intake opening operable by said pulsations.

6. In a suction nozzle, a casing having an intake opening and having an opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, means within said casing operable by the ow of air therethrough for causing pulsations in said flow, and a separate agitator member movably mounted in said casing independent of the pulsation means and adjacent to the intake opening and arranged to move duc to said pulsations.

'7. In a suction nozzle, a casing having an intake opening and having an opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, means in said casing for causing varying air movement therein, and a separate agitator member resiliently supported in said casing independently of the ilrstmentioned means adjacent to the intake opening and movable by said varying air movement.

8. In a suction nozzle, a casing having an intake opening and having an opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, a pulsation member secured within said casing disposed in the path of air ow toward the last-mentioned opening, said member being resilient and arranged to be vibrated by said air flow to thereby cause pulsations in the flow, and agitating means in said casing mounted independently of said pulsation member adjacent to said intake opening operable by said pulsations.

9. In a suction nozzle, a casing having an intake opening and having an opening adapted to be connected to a. source of suction, a pulsation member secured within said casing disposed in the path of air flow toward the last-mentioned opening, said member being resilient and arranged tobe vibrated by said air ow to thereby cause pulsations in the flow, an agitator member, and means for mounting said member in said casing independently of the pulsation member and adjacent to said intake opening and so as to be movable in vertical direction only due to said pulsations.

f 10. In a suction nozzle, a casing having an intake opening and having an opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, apulsation member secured within said casing disposed in the path of air ilow toward the last-mentioned opening, said member being resilient and arranged to be vibrated by said air ilow to thereby cause pulsations in the ilow, an agitator member, and means for resiliently supporting said member in said casing independently of said pulsation member and adjacent to the intake opening and movable in response to the pulsations.

11. In a suction nozzle, a casing having an intake opening and having an outlet opening adapted to beconnected to a source of suction, a pulsation member secured within said casing disposed in the path of air flow toward said outlet opening, said member being resilient and arranged to be vibrated by said air ow to thereby cause pulsations in the flow, a flexible diaphragm secured in said casing and dividing the casing into a first chamber adjacent to said intake opening and a Second chamber adjacent to said outlet opening, and an agitator member secured to said diaphragm and formed with an opening therethrough for the passage of air from said rst chamber to said second chamber.

12. In a suction nozzle, a casing having an intake opening and having an outlet opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, a pul- Vsation member secured within said casing disposed in the path of air flow toward said outlet opening, said member being resilient and arranged to be vibrated by said air flow to thereby cause pulsations in the flow, an agitator member within said casing adjacent to said intake opening, resilient means for supporting said agitator member from said casing, and a flexible diaphragm between said agitator member and said casing dividing said casing into two chambers, said agitator member being formed with an opening therethroughY for the passage of air from one chamber to the other.

13. In a suction nozzle, a casing having an intake opening and having an outlet passage adapted to be connected to a source of suction, a pulsation member comprising resilient material secured to said casing and, in unatressed condition, substantially closing said outlet passage and being adapted to be deformed by the suction'tok thereby open the outlet passage, a ilexible diaphragm secured in said casing and dividing the casing into a iirst chamber adjacent to said intake opening and a second chamber adjacent to said outlet opening, and an agitator member secured to said diaphragm and formed with an opening therethrough for the passage of air from said rst chamber to said second chamber.

14. In a suction nozzle, a casing having an intake opening and having an outlet passage adapted to be connected to a source of suction, a pulsation member comprising resilient material secured to said casing and, in unstressed condition, substantially closing said outlet passage and being adapted to be deformed by the suction to thereby open the outlet passage, an agitator 'member within said casing adjacent to said intake opening, resilient means for supporting said agitator member from said casing, and a flexible diaphragm between lsaid agitator member and said casing dividing said casing into two chambers, said agitator member being formed with an opening therethrough for the passage of air from one chamber to the other. l,

15. In a suction nozzle, a hollow casing having edges dening an elongated intake opening, said casing formed with an outlet passage adapted to an opening therethrough communicating with said recess, means for resiliently supporting said .agitator member longitudinally within said casing with the edges thereof bounding said recess adjacent to the plane of the edges dening said intake opening, and a flexible diaphragm be. tween said agitator member and said casing dividingsaid casing into two chambers.

16. In a suction nozzle, Aa. hollow casing comprising an upper part anda lower part hinged together, the lower edge of said lower part defning an inlet opening, said upper part formed with an outlet opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, a pulsation member secured within said upper part disposed in the path of air flow toward said outlet opening, said member being resilient and arranged to bevibrated by said air now to thereby cause., pulsations in the flow, a fl/exible diaphragm secured to said lower part, and an agitator member secured to the central part of said diaphragm and disposed adjacent to said intake opening.

17 In a suction nozzle, a hollow casing having an intake opening, a iiexible diaphragmsecured within said casing, an.agitator member secured to the central part of-said diaphragm and formed with an opening therethrough, said diaphragm and said agitator member dividing the interior of said casing into a lower chamber adjacent to said intake opening and an upper chamber, said casing being formed with an outlet opening communicating with said upper chamber and adapted to be connected to a source of suction, said casing being formed with an auxiliary inlet opening communicating with Vsaid upper chamber and with the atmosphere, and a pulsation member disposed in the path of air flow through said auxiliary vinlet opening. e

18. In a suction nozzle, a hollow casing having an intake opening, a flexible diaphragm secured within said casing, 4an agitator member secured to the central' part of said diaphragm and formed with an openingv therethrough, said diaphragm and said agitator member dividing the interior of said casing into a lower chamber adjacent to said intake opening and an upper chamber, said casing being formed with an outlet opening communicating with said upper chamber and adapted to be connected to a source of suction, said casing beingvformed with an auxiliary inlet opening communicating with said lower chambera and with the atmosphere, and a pulsation member disposed in the path of air flow through said auxiliary inlet opening. t

19. In a suction nozzle, a hollow casing having an inlet opening, a exible diaphragm secured within said casing, an agitator member secured to the central part of said diaphragm and formed with an opening therethrough, said diaphragm and said agitator member dividing the interior of said casing into a lower chamber adjacent to lsaid intake opening and an upper chamber, said casing beingformed with an outlet opening communicating with said upper chamber and adapted to be connected to a source of suction, said casing being formed with an auxiliary inlet opening communicating with the interior oisaid casing and with the atmosphere, a first pulsation member disposed in the path of air ow through said auxiliary inlet opening, and a second pulsation member disposed in the path of air ow through said outlet opening.

*20; In a suction cleaning device, a hollow member having 'an intake opening and an opening l adapted to be connected to a source of suction, an

agitator member movably mounted with respect to said hollow member and movable due to variations of flow of air in said hollow member, and lmeans separatel from the agitator and located within said hollow member for producing said variations of flow of air/in 'said hollow member to cause movement of vsaid agitator member.

21. In a suction cleaning device, a hollow member having an intake opening and an opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, an agitator member movably mounted witl-r, respect to said hollow member and movable in a plurality of directions due to variations of flow of air owing in one direction in said hollow member, and means separate from the agitator for producing said variations of now of air in said hollow member to cause movement of said agitator member.

22. In a suction cleaning device, a hollow member having an intake opening and an opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, a movable diaphragm in said hollow member, an agitator member secured to said diaphragm and movable therewith, and means for-varying the air pressure acting on said diaphragm to cause movement thereof. l

23. In a suction nozzle, a hollow member having an intake opening and an opening adapted to be connected to a source of suction, a movable diaphragm in said hollow member, an agitator member secured to said diaphragm and movable n therewith, and means locatedwithin said hollow member for varying the air pressure acting on said diaphragm to cause movement thereof.

FREDRIK JOHAN ROBERT KARLSTRM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2785432 *Jun 9, 1953Mar 19, 1957Rockwell Chauncey LVacuum cleaning head utilizing multiple suction cavities
US2825925 *Apr 5, 1954Mar 11, 1958Hoover CoSuction nozzle with suction powered agitator
US2858560 *Jul 30, 1953Nov 4, 1958Bodine Jr Albert GPulsating suction cleaner with oscillating beater
US2864119 *Sep 14, 1953Dec 16, 1958Crise Wilford PVacuum cleaner for drawing air through and intermittently over surface being cleaned
US2867836 *Apr 4, 1955Jan 13, 1959Hoover CoAir actuated cleaning tool
US2951257 *Jun 23, 1953Sep 6, 1960Bodine Jr Albert GVacuum cleaner with pulsating suction
US2959805 *Oct 22, 1956Nov 15, 1960Bodine Jr Albert GSuction cleaner with beater action and vibration isolator
US3005224 *Oct 23, 1958Oct 24, 1961Preco IncAir flow operated brush devices for vacuum cleaners
US3052234 *May 26, 1960Sep 4, 1962Health Mor IncVibrator attachment for suction cleaner
US5577994 *May 11, 1992Nov 26, 1996Celik; UrsulaVacuum massage appliance
US6161251 *Jan 27, 1999Dec 19, 2000Lg Electronics, Inc.Suction nozzle for vacuum cleaner
US6196982Dec 30, 1997Mar 6, 2001Terry A. BallVacuum massager
US6200281 *Aug 6, 1999Mar 13, 2001Jean FrajdenrajchMassaging device which is designed to be applied to the skin of a person
US20110295162 *Feb 17, 2010Dec 1, 2011Tae-Soun ChangMassage apparatus and massage cup with dual structure for massage apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/375, 15/379, 601/46, 15/382, 601/6
International ClassificationA47L9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/0416
European ClassificationA47L9/04B4