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Publication numberUS2032386 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1936
Filing dateDec 11, 1933
Priority dateDec 11, 1933
Publication numberUS 2032386 A, US 2032386A, US-A-2032386, US2032386 A, US2032386A
InventorsFrank S Wood
Original AssigneeFrank S Wood
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective paper package
US 2032386 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 3, 1936. F. s. WOOD PROTECTIVE PAPER PACKAGE Filed Dec. 11, 1935 ity may wrapping paper be used, commercially,-

Patented Mar. 3, 1936 UNITED" STATES oFFIcE I 3 Claims.

The packaging of goods has become a general custom, almost an art, and the imitation of famous brands, a racket. The prevention of imitations, substitutes and counterfeits, are the objects of this invention. Those objects are obtained by means of the materials with which the package is wrapped and sealed as will be hereafter described.

It is fundamental, in this invention, that the first protection must be given the paper out of which the package is made, and I call attention to several patents that have recently issued or been allowed to me for safety paper and processes of making No. 1,900,067 March 14, 1933; No. 1,939,378, December 12, 1933; No. 1,951,076, March 13, 1934; and Serial Number 552,550 application allowed December 1, 1933. It is upon this paper and its evolution into protective paper that I rely for some of my protective paper.

Safety paper is known to the trade and the art as being, strictly, a special kind of writing paper; and while there is nothing to hinder the use of writing paper for wrapping packages, as a mat ter of fact, writing paper and wrapping paper are two diiferent classes of goods. Therefore, I define protective paper as an evolution of safety paper especially adapted for packaging, both having certain characteristics in common and differing widely in others. Thus, whilesafety paper could be used for protectivepaper, by no possibile for writing paper. I

While the patents above mentioned. describe certain desirable characteristics elsewhere set forth that a protective paper should have, there are other and later developments that are better.

In Patent No. 1,900,067 issued to me March 14, 1933, is described and specified a paper meeting all the essentials of a protective paper, subject to the differences of furnish between a writing paper and a Wrapping paper, and the differences in formulas required to make the adaptation.

A specific object of this invention isto seal a paper package .so that it cannot be unsealed without destroying the wrapper or discoloring it; and since it would be easy to counterfeit an ordinary paper wrapper, a controlled protective paper with my dual or safety seal is the most effective way of identifying an original package, while a seal that cannot be broken without leaving evidences of tampering is the only means of making a protective paper unbeatable. No matter how good the protective paper might be, if the seal could be broken and the contents tampered with or replaced, the paper would be a worthless protection. It should thus be clear that both the identifying paper and the safety seal are equally important.

The present state of the art has conclusively demonstrated that the color blue is of a higher vibration or wave length than the color green, also that white is the perfect reflection of all colors. In obtaining the results just described which are caused by chemicals, I know of no Way to ascertain whether those results come from the raising or lowering of vibration of a chemical composition or whether it does something to paper that causes its reflective power to break down. with age, under controlled conditions. Then, again, it may be due to the action of cosmic rays, of which little is known.

There is a universal male and female or positive and negative principle that illustrates the two essential factors of my invention. The protective paper is the receptive or negative member that is acted upon, and the dual seal is the active or positive member that produces a union between the two members thatcannot be broken without either destroying the female member or giving it a hideous discoloration.

My invention includes two steps in the sealing process: 1st, the melting of parafiin or its equivalent and the dissolving therein of a small quantity of oil-soluble coloring matter; and 2d, the application of this melted paraffin-color in the form 30 of a narrow band or striped coating to a wider band of adhesive or glue while still wet and after said glue has been applied in anydesired way. When thus applied, the two form a dual seal and unite the two portions of; protective 35 paper to be sealed, so strongly, that it cannot be unsealed by any other means than steaming without destroying the paper wrapper; and any heat in excess of melts the paraffin which penetrates the paper'and acts as a carrier for the 40 dissolved color, leaving irremovable evidences of tampering.

Specifically, by protective paper, I mean any of my safety papers, patented or otherwise, orevolutions thereof that I may use as the protective 45 paper member of this invention orany other paper having more desirable protective qualities. This may be of any color or tint and that has the attribute of identifying itself by a simple chemical test or by means of ultra violet rays. In this 50 regard, my ink set papers, patented, provide self identification by writing upon them with any permanent ink and then using any commercial eradicators comprising a weak acid and a chlorine solution. If eradication sets the ink, the protective paper establishes the fact that it is the original package. If the ink does not set, it is not the original packagebut a substitute or imitation. Ultra violet rays'dem'onstrate the same thing in a different way. In addition I may also use as the protective paper member of this invention, papers that are described in pending applications, and I also intend to use other available papers.

Another equally important factor in this invention is the proper sealing of the package, for the reason that a dual seal supplies essential safeguards against tampering and provides detection features that will now be described.

I am aware that a small amount of paraffin when applied to paper prevents it from sticking to many things. I am also aware that the mixing of certain proportions of paraflin with certain proportions of resin makes it adhere to paper under the application of heat. But I believe that I am tle first to use a mixture of melted paraflin and an oil soluble dye in such proportions as to cause the paraflin mixture to act as a dual or safety seal when a narrow strip of it has been superposed upon a wider strip of glue or its equivalent. Whether the melted paraflin-dye mixture instantly becomes a solid or not when applied to the glue, and whether or not it coagulates instantly when superposed on a strip of wet glue, is a technical point; but it does instantly cease to be a liquid, it ceases to spread over the surfaces that it contacts, and it seals paper, under such conditions, which is brought in contact with it. If this were not true, the paper contacting the narrow band of parafiindye would not be sealed. A careful dissection of such a seal proves that itis sealed. This is no more surprising than that paraffin seals the glass jar of the housewifes preserves. It has been determined by instruments of. precision that this is a permanent condition under temperatures of less than 140; but at and above that temperature the paraiiin melts, permeates the paper, and acts as a carrrier of the oil soluble dye that discolors the paper hideously.

After the goods have been wrapped in the protective paper, it is necessary to seal the package at the top, bottom, and along one side where the overlapping edge comes. At these points, any

strongly adherent glue or its equivalent 'maypreferably be used and applied in the usual way. See drawing. Fig. 1 shows a sheet of paper to the right hand stippled edge of which a band of glue 2 has been applied; andto this a narrower band of melted parafiin in which has been dissolved an oil soluble coloring member; these two bands create asafety seal for said paper. Fig: 2

shows a box that has been wrapped and safety sealed. The horizontal band 3 shows the outline of the paraflin stripe on the sealed package while the vertical'band 3 shows the discoloration that takes place when subjected to a temperature of 140 or more. To this band of glue -2 is applied a narrower band 3 of a dual adhesive that is prepared by adding a small quantity of oil soluble' coloring matter to melted paraflin or its equivalent. It is obvious that this may be confined to one color or that a plurality of colors in separate containers may be used. When paraflin, in liquid form, is applied to the glue, it coagulates in cooling and thus prevents the color from spreading outside the narrow band. The glued edges of the protective paper are now pressed together and the package issealed. On account of the high degree of adherence provided by the dual seal, the only way that the package may be opened without tearing the paper is by the application of moist heat to the sealed strip. It is obvious that any tearing of the paper leaves behind it danger signals which serve notice that the package has been tampered with. When any moist heat, such as steam, is applied to the seals for the purpose of unsealing, the parafiin melts at the temperature of 140 Fahrenheit, and becomes a liquid. This contains the coloring material in solution and the then liquid solution spreads and permeates the paper causing discolorations which irreparably brand the package as having been tampered with.

Dual seal or dual adhesive is the same thing. It is applied-as follows: First the glue is applied to the paper by means of a brush; second, the melted paraffin in which has been dissolved the oil soluble coloring matter is applied with a narrower brush to the band of glue that has been applied to the paper. The paraffin with its color carrier coagulates instantly and does not run either into the glue or the paper. Should the contents ofthe package be removed from its original wrapper and another wrapper substituted, an ink test with eradication serves notice that the contents are not in its original package for the reason that ink written upon any other than the original protective paper, instantly disappears with the use of eradicators. Since the protective paper is made of a special type solelyfor the manufacturers of the goods in the original package, it will be most difllcult to imitate or counterfeit for the same reasons that the paper upon which government currency is printed is not easy to obtain for the purpose of counterfeiting. This purpose could only be brought about with the co-operation of a vpaper- 1. A protected paper package comprising anv impressible member provided with such visible identifications of the original package as to produce a non-duplicatable condition therein, and an active sealing member consisting of glue or its equivalent and an oil-soluble dye dissolved in melted paraflin adapted to seal said original package so as to produce a dual or safety sealed condition that cannot be unsealed without either destroying or discoloring said impressible member,

said active sealing member being of a nature to show discoloration in, said impressible member when its temperature is raised to 140 or more Fahrenheit.-

2. A protective paper ackage comprising an impressible member provi ed with such invisible identifications of the original package as to produce a non-duplicatable condition therein, and an active sealing member'consisting or glue or its equivalent and an oil soluble dye dissolved in melted paraflin adapted to seal said original pack and invlsibleidentiflcations of the original package as to produce a non-duplica'table condition therein, and an active sealing member consisting of glue or its equivalent and an oil soluble dye dissolved in melted paraflin adapted to seal said original package so as to produce a dual or safety sealed condition that cannot be unsealed without either destroying or discolo'ring said inipressible member, said sealing member being of a nature to show discoloration in said impressible member when its temperature is raised to 140 or more Fahrenheit.

FRANK S. WOOD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3285771 *Dec 21, 1962Nov 15, 1966Johnson & JohnsonPermanent attachment pressure sensitive adhesive tape
US3593913 *Apr 29, 1969Jul 20, 1971Fred C BremerDocument carrier construction
US3895755 *Feb 27, 1974Jul 22, 1975Lawrence Peska Ass IncTamper proof envelope
US4120445 *May 12, 1976Oct 17, 1978Ludlow CorporationA pouch having a polymer-based cohesive seal and a coating of small polymeric particles
US4273362 *Apr 21, 1978Jun 16, 1981Ludlow CorporationInformation-bearing article for conveying information which cannot be surreptitiously detected
US4391662 *Dec 8, 1981Jul 5, 1983Hilti AktiengesellschaftMethod of and means for providing an effective thermoplastic adhesive connection or seal using thermochrome dye
US5044300 *Apr 18, 1990Sep 3, 1991Herd Douglas MBarrier wrapper
US5344016 *Dec 4, 1991Sep 6, 1994Highland Supply CorporationWrapping material for wrapping a floral grouping having staggered strips of adhesive material applied thereto and method
US5347789 *Jun 3, 1992Sep 20, 1994Highland Supply CorporationDecorative material having a colored sticky element disposed thereon forming at least a portion of a decoration and method
US5482752 *Jul 11, 1994Jan 9, 1996Highland Supply CorporationDecorative material having a colored sticky element disposed thereon forming at least a portion of a decoration
US5588530 *May 16, 1994Dec 31, 1996Southpac Trust International, Inc.Wrapping material for wrapping a floral grouping having staggered strips of adhesive material applied thereto and method
US5632130 *May 1, 1995May 27, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Wrapping material for wrapping a floral grouping having staggered strips of adhesive material applied thereto and method
US5661951 *Jun 7, 1995Sep 2, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral product with a sheet of material having a three dimensional pattern printed thereon
US5669202 *May 18, 1995Sep 23, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method for using a decorative material having a colored sticky element disposed thereon forming at least a portion of a decoration
US5720151 *Mar 19, 1997Feb 24, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral product with a sheet of material having a three dimensional pattern printed thereon
US5720152 *Mar 19, 1997Feb 24, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral product with a sheet of material having a three dimensional pattern printed thereon
US5720155 *Mar 19, 1997Feb 24, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral product with a sheet of material having a three dimensional pattern printed thereon
US5727363 *Mar 19, 1997Mar 17, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral product with a sheet of material having a three dimensional pattern printed thereon
US5839255 *Nov 10, 1997Nov 24, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method for forming a preformed pot cover having a three dimensional pattern printed thereon
US6016919 *Dec 18, 1997Jan 25, 2000Motion Design, Inc.Packaging container for allowing inspection of contents
US6158589 *Sep 23, 1999Dec 12, 2000Motion Design, Inc.Boxes with internal resilient elements
US6206194Jun 9, 1999Mar 27, 2001Motion Design, Inc.Boxes with internal resilient elements and insert therefor
US6311843Oct 1, 1999Nov 6, 2001Motion Design, Inc.Packaging boxes and components with internal resilient elements
US6588309Jan 18, 2002Jul 8, 2003Donald E. WederDecorative grass having a three-dimensional pattern and methods for producing same
US6596352Jan 25, 2002Jul 22, 2003Southpac Trust International, Inc.Decorative grass having a three-dimensional pattern and methods for producing same
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/87.18, 229/102, 229/83, 493/328, 229/87.1, 106/270, 206/807
International ClassificationB65D65/38
Cooperative ClassificationY10S206/807, B65D65/38
European ClassificationB65D65/38