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Publication numberUS2032931 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1936
Filing dateApr 9, 1932
Priority dateApr 9, 1932
Publication numberUS 2032931 A, US 2032931A, US-A-2032931, US2032931 A, US2032931A
InventorsGibbs John C
Original AssigneeAnchor Cap & Closure Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure cap and package
US 2032931 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

V.1. c. Glass 2,032,931

CLOSURE CAP AND PACKAGE March 3, 1936.

Filed April 9, 1932 Zig.

lNvENToR Aid A1l'ToRNEY Patented Mar. 3, 193e PATENT OFFICE CLOSURE CAP AND PACKAGE John o. Gibbs. Brooklyn, N. Y., mainmto Anchor Cap & Closure Corporation, Long Island City, N. Y., a vcorporation of New York Application April 9, 1932, Serial N0. 604,143

19 Claims. (Cl. 215-56) The` present invention relates to the sealing art, and more particularly to an improved closure cap and sealed package formed thereby.

Certain products, when sealed, tend to form or generate pressure within the package; for example, a product having eiervescent salts therein, rsuch as Bromo-Seltzer, may create a pressure of sixty or more pounds per square inch, depending upon the amount of moisture in the product. Where a glass container is used, such-pressures are particularly dangerous because fragments of broken glass projected by the pressure within the container may, in case of breakage, do serious injury to both person and property. While glass would probably sustain a substantial internal pressure, there is always the chance of the container being broken by contact with external objects, in which case, the particles of glass will be blown outwardly with considerable force. Another objection is that the sudden release of the pressure when the cover is removed tends to blow out some of the contents of the package. lThese characteristics, directly attributable to pressure within the container, cause complaints by consumers and, in many cases, cause the consumers to think that the product is spoiled. Clure caps are sold in enormous quantities, and the cost thereof must necessarily be reduced to a minimum. Any 4slight increase in the cost of caps is likely to cause packers to refuse to use the caps. Therefore, the solution of the above problem, in order to be practical, must not increase substantially the cost of the cap.

The present invention aims to provide a simple, inexpensive closure and package, which will eliminate the above difficulties, without increasing the cost of the package.

yAn object of the invention is to provide an inexpensive closure adapted to vent a package when'excessive pressure accumulates therein.

Another object of the invention is to provide an inexpensive closure adapted to relieve the pressurein apackage when excessive pressure accumulates therein, without impairing the efiectiveness ofthe seal.

Another object of the invention is to provide an inexpensive closure cap which will relieve -pressure in a package and will reseal itself afterthe pressure has been relieved.

Another object of the invention is to provide an inexpensive sealed package which will automatically vent when excessive pressure exists in I it, and will automatically .reseal after the pressure is relieved.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved 'cap and package particularly useful for products likely to generate pressure within the package.

Other and further objects of the invention 5 will be obvious upon an understanding of the illustrative embodiment `about to be described, or will be indicated in the appended claims, and various advantages not referred to herein will occur to one skilled in the art upon employment lo of the invention in practice.

A preferred embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration anddescription and is shown in the accompanying drawing, forming a part of the specification, wherein 15 Fig. lis a perspective view of a preferred form of the closure cap;

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view along the line .2-2 of Fig. l;

Referring again to the drawing, and more par- 30 l ticularly to Figs. 1 to 4 thereof, therev is shown a container i, having screw threads or lugs 2 at the upper end thereof adapted to cooperate with similar threads or lugs on a closure cap. Preferably, the container is made of glass, although 'other 35 materials might be utilized. The container is sealed by means of a closure cap li, having a cover portion t, a .depending skirt t, with its lower edge rolled upwardly and outwardly to form a bead 1. The bead l, in the preferred form of cap, is struck 40 inwardly at intervals about the periphery thereof to provide a series of lugs 8 adapted to engage, and cooperate with, the threads or lugs 2 on the container to secure the cap to the container. A

liner 9 is provided in the upper part of the closure 45` cap and is adapted to engage the rim of the con`. tainer to form a seal thereon.

`In order to obtain maximum sealing pressure between the rim of the container and the cover portion of the cap, an annular groove i0 is pro- 50 vided, which concentrates the pressure on the liner over a small area and thereby increases the effectiveness of the seal. The annular groove i0, which forms a depending ridge for engagement with the liner, is preferably interrupted at intervals,asshownat II. lheplll'peofthese interruptions is to provide one or more points above the rim of the container, where the liners is. not directly in contact with the cover portion of the cap.' The ends of the depending ridge I 0, adjacent vthe interruptions, sure to seal the package under normal conditions and to hold the liner .l against the rim of the' container at the interruptions II, The arcuate segments of the groo've Il, shown herein as three, form a series of pressure members which are spaced from each other, leaving short gaps below which less pressure is applied to the liner. When such a closure cap is applied to a product which tends to form pressure within the container, the seal retains the product in sealed condition and prevents access of moisture or other extraneous matter. However, when pressure forms inside the package, while the liner is held rigidly in position by the spaced arcuate gripping portions III, the portions of the liner directly below the interruptions II have very little pressure thereon. As a result, the internal pressure within the container forces the liner upwardly at I I, as shown in exaggerated form by the dotted lines in Fig. 4, permitting the pressure to leak out very gradually. The amount of distortion of the liner to relieve the pressure is so slight that, when the. pressure is relieved, the linerreturns to its sealed position, preventing access of moisture, orother matter, to the interior of the container.

By increasing or decreasing the amount that the arcuate ribs Il are separated, that is, the width' of the gaps II, the cap may be constructed to relieve internal pressure at ilv'e, ten, or ilfteen pounds, as desired, without impair-ing the eectiveness of the seal against the entrance of air or moisture.

In Fig. 5, a slightly modified construction is shown, which diners from that shown in Figs. 1 to 4 in that the arcuate depressed grooves III are omitted and one or more upward depressions I2 are made in the cover part of the cap directly above the rim of the container. In this construction, a ilat surface is presented to the liner for pressing it against the rim of the container. The pressure applied by the cover portion of the cap is relieved at one or more points bythe raised portions I2, in the cover portion of the cap. By

, the proper design of the sizes of the portion I2,

the cap can be made to relieve the pressure within the package when a particular pressure is reached.

In Fig. 6, the present invention is illustrated applied to a closure cap having a continuous thread I4 in the skirt thereof, adapted to cooperate with a continuous thread on the upper end of a container.

It will be understood that the present invention may -be applied to other types of screw closure caps, with advantage, although thev preferred embodiment is particularly applicable to the types shown. In utilizing the invention, the closure cap is made by the manufacturer, with the spaced sealing grooves III therein and the liner 8 assembled with the cap. 'l'he packer seals the cap to the container in the ordinary way.

When'the cap is screwed home, an effective seal is formed. The manufacturer of the' cap may regulate the relative position and sizes of the sealing grooves Il to permit the package to vent at desired pressures. Ordinarily, a single form of cap may be used for various products, because it is only necessary to relieve the pressure when it has exceeded a certain magnitude. ,whichis willy sumcient presgenerally the same, irrespective of the type of product.

It will be seen that the present invention provides an inexpensive closure cap which will vent a product at a desired pressure, without impairingr the effectiveness or emciency of/,the seal against entrance of external atmosphere or moisture. The closure is made from a single piece of metal or of other suitable material and the improvement may be embodied in existing machines by changing the construction of the tools used for forming the caps. The cap may not only be used on packages likely to develop excessive pressures, but may be used on various types of products, irrespective of whether or not the venting feature is necessary with the product. I'he many characteristics are achieved without increasing the amount of material used 'for the cap and without increasing the cost of the cap. 'Ihe simplicity of the closure for achieving the result is an important feature of the invention.

As various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and without sacriilcing its advantages, it is to be understood that all matter herein is to be interpreted as limiting sense. c

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1'. A screw closure cap comprising the combination of a cover portion, a depending skirt, a liner seated in said cap, means insaid skirt for engaging threads or lugs on a container, and an impervious dis liner in said cap, said cover portion having a portion thereof pressed upwardly above the rim of the receptacle to decrease the pressure on the liner at s'aid upwardly pressed portion tol permit exing of the liner to relieve excess pressure without entrance of external atmosphere.

2. A sealed package comprising the combination of a container having thread engaging means thereon, a screw closure cap having a cover portion and a' depending skirt, a disc liner seated in said cap sealing the container at the rim thereof, and means in the skirt of said cap for engaging the thread engaging means on said container, said cover portion having a portion thereof pressed upwardly to decrease the pressure on the liner and to permit said liner to move out of sealing relation with the rim of the container at said upwardly pressed portion.

3. A sealed package comprising the combination of a container having screw lugs lthereon, a screw closure cap having a cover portion and a depending skirt, the bottom of .said skirt being rolled into a bead, aliner seated in said cap, and lugs formed from .said bead for engagement with the lugs on the container, said cover portion hav ing a depending annular ridge therein positioned to lie vertically above the rim of the container and having a radially extending interruption at a portion thereof to decrease the downward pressure on the liner against the rim of the container at said interrupted portion to release excess pressure within the container.

y 4. A sealed package comprising the combination of a container having closure engaging means l at the upper end thereof, a closure cap having a cover portion and `a depending skirt, container engaging means formed in the skirt of said cap and a disc liner seated in said cap, the cover portion of said cap having a downwardly depending ridge directly above the rim oi' the container adapted to press the 'liner against the rim of the container, said ridge being interrupted at a porustrative and not in a.

tion of a container having screw threads or lugs' at the upper end thereof, a closure cap having a cover portion and a depending skirt, an im# pervious disc liner in said closure cap, and'means in the skirt of said cap for engaging the container, and means in the cover portion of said cap directly above the rim of the container for applying an uneven pressure to said liner over the rim of the container and to hold said liner'ln sealing engagement with said rim, and providing a radial passage in said cap across the rim of the container, whereby the pressure =on said liner is less at a certain point circumferentially of the rim than at others to permit said liner to flex at said portion where less pressure is exerted thereon to relieve excessive gaseous pressure within the container.

6. A sealed package comprising a container having lcap engaging means at the upper end thereof, a liner adapted to seal said container, and a closure cap having a cover portion and a depending skirt, means in the skirt of said cap for engaging the container, vand an annular depending rib in said cover portion directly above the rim of the container for pressing portions of the liner downwardly against the rim of said container, said rib being interrupted at intervals to provide radial passages across the rim'tc permit said liner to ex upwardly at said interruptions and relieve pressure within the package.

7. A screw closure cap comprising the combination of a cover portion, a depending skirt, means in said skirt for engaging threads or lugs on a container, a liner of cardboard in said cap, and an annular depending ridge in said cover portion having substantially the same diameter as that of a rim of a container adapted to receive the cap and positioned to lie circumferentially above the rim4 of the 'container when the cap is applied thereto, said ridge being interrupted at a portion thereof to permit the liner to flex at said interruption to vent upon the formation of substantial pressures in the container.

8. A screw closure cap comprising the combination of a cover portion, a depending skirt, means in said skirt for engaging threads on a container, a disc liner in said cap, and a plurality of definitely spaced arcuate projections in said cover portion positioned to lie above the rim of a container, said projections having recesses between the ends thereof, said projections being substantiallyr deep, thereby spacing said disc liner from said cover portion to provide passages extending radially above the rim when said cap is sealed on a container and permitting said liner to flex upwardly into said recesses and relieve excessive pressure.

9. A sealed package comprising the combination of a container having' cap engaging means thereon, a closure cap having a'cover portion and a depending skirt, container engaging means the container, said recesses permitting said liner to flex upwardly at the rim of the container to relieve excessive pressure within the container.

10. A sealed package comprising in combination, a container, a screw cap adapted to be sealed on said container, a disc liner in said cap,

and an annular zone in the co'ver of said cap adapted to press said liner downwardly at portions in contact with the rirn of the container, saidzone having passages between the cap and the liner, said passages extending radially across the rim of the container to permit said liner to ilex upwardly at the rim and facilitate venting f the pressure in the container.

'a closure cap ,having a cover portion and a depending skirt, means in the skirt for engaging said 4container and sealing saidl cap thereon, a' disc liner in said cap, and an annular sealing ridge positioned vertically above the rim of the container, said ridge having passages therein extending radially across the rim to permit said liner to iiex upwardly in response to pressure in the package.

12. A screw closure cap comprising a cover portion, a depending skirt having means for engaging a container, a liner mounted in said cap, and a seaiing zone in the cover portion positioned with respect to the skirt so that it is adapted to lie circumferentially above the rim of the container andis adapted to press the liner vertically downwardly against the rim, said zone having' radially extending passages therein to permit said liner to flex upwardly' vat portions in contact with the rim.

13. A sealed package comprising the combination of a container having screw threads or lugs at the upper end thereof, a closure cap having a cover portion and a depending skirt provided with container engaging means, a disc liner in said closure cap, an annular zone in the cover portion directly over the rim of the container for applying pressure to the liner to hold it against the rim of the container, said zone having radially extending passages at portions thereof extending across the rim of the container to permit said liner to flex at said passages to relieve pressure within the container.

14. A metal closure for a container comprising a cap, to be securely fastened to the container, having inverted radially extending channels across its closed end, said channels being of sufcient width and depth that a liner fitted inside of the cap will buckle upwardly into said channels upon increased internal gas pressure in the container to allow escape of excess gas or vapor from the container, the liner being resilient to reseat itself against the rim of the container upon reduction of the internal gas pressure.

15. A metal closure for a container comprising a cap, to be securely fastened to the container, having a series of inverted radially extending channels in the cap crown coincident with the container rim, said channels being of suilicient width and depth that a liner tted inside of the cap crown will buckle upwardly along its peripheral portions into said channels upon increased internal gas pressure in the container to allow the escape of excess gas or vapor from the container, the liner being resilient to reseat itself against the rim of the container upon reduction of the internal gas pressure.

16. A metal closure for a container comprising a cap, to be securely fastened to the container, having a series of inverted radially extending channels spaced-apartir: the cap coincident with the container rim. said channels being of sumcient width and `depth that a liner iitted inside of the cap crown will buckle upwardly along its peripheral portions into said channels upon increased internal gas pressure in the container to allow the escape of excess gas or vapor from the container, the liner being resilient to reseat itself against the rim of the container upon reduction of the internal sure.

17. A metal closure for a container comprising a cap to be securely fastened to the container, l, said cap'having a plurality of inverted channels spaced-apart in the cap crown along its sealing surface with the rim of the container, said channels being of sumcient width and depth that a liner fltted inside the cap will buckle upwardly into ."said channels upon increased internal gas pressure in the container to allow the escape of excess gas or vapor therefroin, said liner being resilient to reseat itself against the container rim upon reduction of the internal gas pressure.

18. A metal closure for a container comprising a cap to be securely fastened to the container, said cap having an inverted channel in the cap crown along its sealing surface withfthe rim of the containensaid channel being of suiilcient width and depth that a liner ntted inside the cap will buckle upwardly into said channel upon increased internal gas pressure in the container to allow the escape of excess gas or vapor therefrom, said 'liner being resilient to reseat itself against the container rim upon reduction of the internal gas pressure.

19. A closure for a container comprising a cap, to be securely fastened to the container, having channels across its closed end adapted to extend over the rim of a container. said channels being of suiiicient width and depth that a liner iitted inside of the cap will buckle upwardly into said channels upon increased'internal gas pressure in the container to allow the escape of excess gas or vapor from the container. the liner being resilient to reseat itself against the rim of the container upon reduction of the internal gas pres- Su. V JOHN c. ansias.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2456607 *Aug 14, 1946Dec 14, 1948Stewart ShafferLiner lid for containers
US2576917 *Sep 30, 1948Dec 4, 1951Armstrong Cork CoLinerless venting closure
US2738091 *Jan 11, 1954Mar 13, 1956Mattox Robert GBottle cap
US3114467 *Aug 23, 1961Dec 17, 1963Bernardin Bottle Cap Company ISelf-venting bottle cap
US3239091 *Mar 24, 1964Mar 8, 1966Driscoll Anthony FClosure liner with provision for venting
US3967746 *Apr 28, 1975Jul 6, 1976Botkin Albert LCanning closure and method
US4036386 *Jun 14, 1976Jul 19, 1977The Procter & Gamble CompanyVenting closure assembly
US4993572 *Sep 1, 1989Feb 19, 1991Anchor Hocking CorporationPressure venting closure
US6502710 *Aug 16, 1999Jan 7, 2003Crown Cork & Steal Technologies CorporationClosure cap
US6783015 *Aug 14, 1999Aug 31, 2004Crown Cork & Seal Technologies CorporationClosure cap
EP0127197A2 *Aug 28, 1981Dec 5, 1984Home Systems Limited M.I.Y.Apparatus with fluid pressure relief means
EP0370272A1 *Oct 31, 1989May 30, 1990Jacob Berg GmbH & Co. KGScrew closure for bottles having a deaeration device
EP0620164A1 *Jul 10, 1991Oct 19, 1994Michael Dr. HertrampfMethod for producing a closure for bottles or the like
WO1991003406A1 *Aug 16, 1990Mar 21, 1991Anchor Hocking CorpPressure venting closure
WO1992000892A1 *Jul 10, 1991Jan 23, 1992Michael HertrampfClosure for a bottle or the like and process for manufacturing it
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/260, 215/351, 215/333, 220/303
International ClassificationB65D51/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65D51/1661
European ClassificationB65D51/16D3