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Publication numberUS2033736 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1936
Filing dateDec 30, 1932
Priority dateDec 30, 1932
Publication numberUS 2033736 A, US 2033736A, US-A-2033736, US2033736 A, US2033736A
InventorsPerryman George H
Original AssigneeScholl Mfg Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for making corn plasters
US 2033736 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 10, 1936.

G. H. PERRYMAM MACHINE FOR MAKING CORN PLASTERS Original Filed Dec. 30, 1932 4 Sheets-Sheet l lNVENTOR March 10; 1936. G. H. PERRYMAMQ 2,033,736

MACHINE FOR MAKING CORN PLASTERS Original Filed. Dec. 50, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 n IIIIIIIIIIIH I mllw llll lm 11ml h n lllllllll March 10, 1936- G. H. PERRYMAM 2,033,736

MACHINE FOR MAKING CORN PLASTERS Original Filed Dec. 50, 1932 4' sh t -sh t 5 RR wk March 10,: 1936. G. H. PERRYMAM 2,033,736

' MACHINE FOR MAKING CORN FLASTERS Original Filed Dec. 30, 1952 4 sh ts-Sh t 4.

Patented 'Mar. 10, 1936 T OFFlCE 'MAcmNE non MAKING conn rmsrnas George H. Perryman, Teaneck, hi. J., assignor to The Scholl Mfg. 00., Inc., a corporation of New York Application December 30, 1932, Serial No. 649,577 Renewed May 21, 1935 g 16 Claims.

\ This invention relates to an improvement in a method and machine for making corn plasters or similar articles. One of the objects of the 111 r plaster and remove the vention is to provide a machine which will rapidly and expeditiously produce the corn plasters from several strips or webs by punching the same therefrom, and apply the corn plasters so produced on the surface of a strip or web of an openmesh, foraminous material such as crinoline, thereafter cutting the crinoline strip into sections each, of which contains as many corn plasters as may be required. One of the obstacles encountered in corn plaster making machines in the past, has been the inability to satisfactorily work on the sticky or adhesive materials from which corn plasters are made, so that it has been practically impossible to stamp or punch the plasters from; a sheet or web and fBrce out the waste material and the plasters from the webby the punching operations, Various methods have been devised for cutting out the plasters while in the strip and then either manually picking out the center waste portions of the plasters, or else using some separate mechani cal means for removing these waste elements. In such cases the production of the plasters has been greatly slowed up, and in cases where the waste portions of the plasters were manually pickedout, the cpmpletion'of the plasters wholly by machine operation was prevented. My invention overcomes-these and other'deficienciestand "defects found in present day corn plaster making machines and processes, because with my machine the materials for producing the plasters, and the backing for them, are fed into themachine and the plastersemerge from the otherend in completedform,'the; operation of makin the plasters being wholly continuous from start to finish.' i I I ha'v e discovered that it is possible to punch the plasters completely out of the strip and remove the waste material simultaneouslywith the punching operation, by temporarily rendering the normal sticky and adhesivematerial of the web or strip, temporarily nonadhesive just prior to and during the punching operations. The result of this isthat when the materialsare fed to the punch which punches out plasters and simultaneously removes the waste material, the strips from which the plasters are formed are rendered temporarily non-adhesive so that the punching operation satisfactorily" operates to produce the waste materialsimultane ously;

A further object of my invention is to provide a machine and process for making these plasters in which the adherence of the finished plasters to V their backing strip is' materially improved by the removal of the moisture from the backing strip just prior to the adhesion of the plasters to the strip, and also by increasing the adhesion-between the plasters and the strip by the application of heat after the plasters have been. applied to "said strip.

More specifically, the invention contemplates a machine in which an adhesive-faced web is fed toward a punching die. As it approaches the-die, its adhesive face is rendered temporarily nonadhesive by "the application of a suitable liquid. When the web reaches the die it is perforated 1-5 thereby, the waste centers of the perforations being simultaneously removed by the die and forced out of the body of the web. Next, a textile fabric backing strip is adhesively attached to the perforated web so that a composite web is thus formed, out of which-the annular plasters are punched and simultaneously forced out of the composite strip and into intimate contact with the face of a. foraminous crinoline web which travels to a cutting device operating to sever the 26- crinoline strip into required lengths.

In the accompanying drawings Fig. 1 is a front elevation of the improved machine; Fig. 2 is a detailed view of the intermittent driving means for one of the feed rollers; Fig. 3 is a'view of several feed rollers showing how a protective covering is strippedfrom the web from which the corn plasters are stamped; Fig. 4 is a. vertical sectional ,view through the machine; Fig. 5 is a sectional v-iewthroughthe bed plate of the machine showing two feed rollers which feed the crinoline strip I with thecorn plasters attached thereto toward 7 the cutting knife; Fig. 6 is a plan view of a sheet 7 of finish'ed corn plasters; Fig. 7 is a sectional view through one of the plasters and the foraminous crinoline backing to which it is adhesively attached; Fig. 8 is a vertical sectional view through the cutting knife, the feed rollers for delivering the crinoline strip and attached cornplasters thereto, and the means for heating the backs of the corn plasters afilxed to the crinoline strip; Fig. 9 is a plan.view of the structure shown in FigI 8 with the cutting knife removed; Fig. 10 is a sectional view on the line I0l0 of Fig. 8, looking in the direction of the arrows; 11 is a view showing the means for heating the plasters after they have been aflixed to the backing strip and the ad J'ustable support; Jig. 12 is a sectional view through the die and associated parts; Fig. 13 is a front view of the die, showing the means for clos- 56 has an adhesive face that ing an electric circuit to operate the electronetic cuttingknife, and Fig. 14 is a plan view of the fixed or female die and associated parts.

The corn plasters made by the method and machine herein described, are shown in detail iii Figs. 6 and 7. p In the form shown, each plaster is in the'shape of an annulus and is usually composed of two or more layers of material. The layer shown'at I0 is that which constitutes the base or body of the .plaster. This layer is stamped from a continuous web or strip drawn from the roll I2 that is wound on the reel l3. The layer l4 constitutes a textilaegbric backing, which es it to the annular member. I. This backing I4 is fed through the machine from the roll l5 and is adhesively united with the strip after said strip has been perforated as will be hereafter described. The adhesive face of the annular member l0 attaches it trQa strip of open-mesh starched textile fabric is such as crinoli-ne, which is fed from the roll ll, wound on the reel l8, and which acts'as a carrier and protective sheet for the plasters aflixed to it, the plasters being sold to the user.

while amxed to the crinoline and subsequently stripped or peeled from the/strip l6. when they are required by the user.

The plasters are thus formed from material passed through the machine in the form of three strips or webs III, l4, and I5, and operated upon to produce the plasters, the flnalform of which 'isdisclosed in Figs. 6 and '1.

The machine is provided with a suitable frame having legs I50, suitably reinforced or braced and carrying a bed plate 12 from which rises a head 20, having bearings 2| in which a crankshaft 22 is rotatably mounted. Secured on the shaft 22 is a pulley 23 which is driven by a belt 24 extending from an electric motor or other suitable source of power. One end of the shaft 22 is provided with an eccentric or crank 25 secured. to a connecting-rod 21 by a toggle 26. A clevis 28 at the lower end of the rod 21 is secured to an arm 29 extending from a housing 30 (Fig. 2) carrying rollers 32 adapted to engage a clutch element 3| and rotate it when the connectingrod 2'l moves the arm 29 in one direction. A feed.

roll 33 is secured'onthe shaft 34 mounted in bearings 52a and on which the clutch element 3| ismounted, so that through the medium of the parts just described, the feed roll is rotated with an intermittent movement;

The web l0 drawn from the reel l3 passes under the 101133, as shown in Fig. 4, the web first passing over a tension roll 35 mountedin 'brackets 31 and located between the reel l3 and operates to drive other feed rolls 40 and 4| by means of a chain 42 which extends from a sprockspeed and in the same direction.

et 43 secured on the shaft 34 of the roll 33. The

chain extends over a sprocket 45 secured on the shaft 45 of the roll 40 and also over a sprocket .41 on the shaft 48 of the roll 4|. Through this 40 and 4| are intermittently rotated at the same Sometimes the web II is providedwith a provo tective fabric'covering Ila (Fig; 3) extending over its adhesive face and before the web is ready 7 for use, itis necessary to'strip the protective web 10d from the adhesive face of the web ID. The manner in which this is done is shown 'in Fig. 3. There the web and attached covering Ila are easily removed by-the dies.

' renders the sticky surface of the web relatiirelyshown extending from the reel i3 and passing about a roll III secured on brackets 1|, exten.iing upward from the base plate 12 of the machine. The protective web lfla is drawn rearwardly or toward the reel I3 and passes between 5 the feed roll 33 and a co-operating upper feed roll 35 which draws it backward or in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 3. Springs 38, acting upon the bearings 39, in which the upper feed roll 35 is mounted,.hoid the roll 35 against the 1 driven roll 33 with the web |0a fed between them.

While the protective web Illa is drawn in one direction, or to the right of Fig. '3, the web I0 is drawn in an oppositedirection, as indicated by the arrow 0, by the rollers 4| and I3, toward th punching die.

when a web l0 without a protective strip Ilia is used as shown in Figs. 1 and 4 the upper-feed roll 35 is not used, and is held away from the periphery of the lower feed roll'33 by a spacer 20 500. (Fig. 4) inserted between the bearings 3|! a sticky or adhesive face of the web temporarily non-adhesive in order to facilitate the operation I of perforating this web by a die and simultaneously removing waste material from the web. The 3 roll 49 receives liquid from the container and applies a thin layer or film of the liquid to the sticky face of the'web so that when the web is fed between the movable or male member 5| and fixed or female member 52 of the punch-' ing die, it is in a temporarily non-adhesive'con- .ditionand can be easily punched, and the waste centers of the openings 53 punched in the web, The amount of liquid in the container 50 is kept constant by a feed pipe 5|- extending from a suitable drip-feed valve leading from a tank containing a supply of the liquid. 1

After passing over the roll 49,

the die members 5| and 52 where the co-operat- 'ingdie elements and 55 on the respective dies punch out arow of the apertures 53 in the strip. In punching out the apertures 53, the die elethe web IO then extends under a guide plate 54 and between 5Qv ments or stud portions 55 simultaneously force 55 the waste centers of these openings out of the body' of the web and down into the chute 51 from which they pass into a suitable receptacle. 0rdinarily' it is almost impossibie to perform this simultaneous .punching and waste-removing operation with material possessing the sticky or adhesive characteristics ofrithe material used in making corn plasters. However, due to the application of the alcohol, water or the like, which temporarily non-adhesive just prior tothe stamping operation, the operation just described is easilyperfoi'nied. 11, h

- The male diememberii consists of a plate or head 52 (see Figs. 4 and 12i having the die elements or stud portions 55 extending downwarggy from it and adapted to cooperate-with the ppe ings 55 in the fixed or female die 52 'to' punch .the apertures 53 in .the web l5. The 'die -head or plate 52 is-attached to an upwardly extending 7 1 portion. movable in guides 64 in'the' frame head 20. A pitman 65 secured to the part 53, of the die is connected eccentrically to the shaft 22 so that the die 5| is vertically reciprocated by rotation of the shaft. Downwardly extending bosses on the die head 52 are guided -.by studs 61 on the fixed die 52 so that the two dies are maintained in correct alignment.

After the web I has been perforated with the apertures or perforations 53, shown in Fig. 14,

it is then adhesively united with the backing strip I4. This strip is fed' from a reel containing. the roll I5, supported ,on the bracket 96a and it extends over the feed roll 40 which is driven by the chain 42 as was heretoforeexplained. The ,roll 40 is preferably provided with a roughened face so that no material slippage between it and the backing strip I4 occurs. This bacldng strip has an adhesive face I4a which'is uppermost asT-thestrippasses over the roll 40. After passing over. they roll 40, the strip extends downwardlyaround a tension roll 69 and thence passes through a slotl5 in the die-head or plate 62. The backing strip l4 then passes under a roll I6 rotatably mounted in brackets 11 extending upwardly from-the fixed or female die 52. The backingstrip l4 then extends substan tially horizontal, and is thus brought co-extensive withJthe web I0 so that its adhesive'face" Ma is ,broughtinto intimate contact with the tenor non-adhesive face of the web ID to which it adheres; as shown in Fig. 4. The two-layer or composite strip made up of the perforated web It] and attached backing strip I4, passes under. a guide l52 and under studs or'die elements 18 on the movable or male die 5], these elements 18 co-operating with complementary openings 19in the fixed or female die 52 to stamp the annular-shaped plasters out of 'the ting ineans.

composite strip i and press them against the 0- raminous or crinoline web IE to which they adhere and by which they are carried away to cut- The strip or web II; which receives the plasters, is fed upwardly from the reel l8 which is .sup-

- portedin the bracket I5I and it passes through- .then extends, horizontally over a resiliently mounted pressure pad 8!. the crinoline material IG contains starch or some likestiifening the slot-89 in 'the base of the fixed die 52 and material and is very; hygroscopic it is found desirable to remove themoisture from" it before the plastersfare. brought into adhesive contact with it to facilitate the adherence of the plasters to thegstrip- Accordingly, a heated plate 82, or otherlike heatingelement. is mounted on the, bracket B2a -onthe frame of the ':machine so that the web} I6 is-moved over. it on its travel 'to the pressure plate 8 I. This application of heat the web so that a perfect adherence plasters and-the strip I6 results;

to the web Ifiser'vsto dry out the moisture in between the As themovable die 5| descends, the "elements or studslfl and co-operati'ng 'aperture's'l9 stamp out the plasterss-f-rom'the composite'strip;

' composed. of thelayers III and" I4; and force "the "p asters out of l-the :strip and-against the fo- I raminous web IE to which they'adhere; The composite strip out ofwhich. the plasters have been punched being then. waste material, 'passes' over a. 'rol'le'rj f82, mounted in atrough o'rcontainer ,93 from which it receivesalcohoL-wateror some other liquid-for the purpose ofrendering the 'perforated composite strip of wastematerial rela- I tiveiy non-adhesive so that there is no material adherence between it and the feed-rolls and Y13 between which it next passes. A pipe I53 leading from a drip-feed system keeps the trough 83 supplied with the liquid. The roll 13 is mounted in bearings 84 provided on the machine frame while'the upper driven roll H is mounted in the bearings 85, spring-pressed by the springs 96 to hold the two rolls in contact. The

roll 4| is driven by the chain 42. and its speed of rotation correlated with that of the rolls 33 and as was heretofore described. From between the two rolls 4! and 13 the composite strip of perforated waste material, indicated at 81 in Figs. 1 and4,.extends upwardly to a takeup 'reel 88 (Fig. l) on which it' is wound. The reel 88 is supported on uprights I54 and is driven by a belt 89 extending'from a pulley driven by a motor 90 through reducing gearing of conventlonal character contained in the gear box 9|.

As the waste material 8'! is being thus carried upwardly and away to its final disposition on the reel,88, the crinoline web I5 to which the plasters have been adhesively attached by the dies, is directed slightly downwardly and passes between apair of feed rolls 92 and 93. The lower feed. 'roll 92 is the driven roll, having ashaft 94 carrying a ratchet 95 that is engaged by a pawl 96 pivotally mounted on a link 91 which has one pivotally connected to the lower end of a connecting rod 98. At its upper end, the connecting rod- 98 is connected by a toggle 99 to an eccentrically disposed pin or crank Illll on the drive shaft 22. As the' shaft 22 is rotated, the connecting rod 98 and the intermittent drive mechanism just described, intermittently rotates the roll 92 so that the same in cooperation with its com- I panion roll 93 feeds the crinoline and the plasters attached thereto-toward a cutting device to be described. By the use of different ratchets in place of that shown at 95, the length of each section of crinoline and resultantly the number of plasters borne by each cut section is regulated.

. For example, in Fig. 6 a severed strip of crinoline bearing a dozen plasters is shown. By arrangement of the notches in the ratchet 95 the pauses in the feeding of the crinoline strip may be regulatedso that the severance'of the strip maybehad' in any desired lengths, as will be readily understood' The shaft 94 of the roller 92 car.

of its-ends loose on the shaft 94 and its other end After the crinoline strip l6 bearing'the plasters passes between the twofeed rolls '92 and 93, it is moved under a heater in the form of a plate or like" element I 0| whi'chapplies heat to the jbacksof the plasters securedon thefl rinoline stripand serves ,to intimateIyf andfirInly attach them to the crinoline, at the same timefully. drymg out-the'alcohol or other liquid previously ap--' l pli'edfor the purpose of rendering the sticky faces of the stripj 'om which the plasterswere formed 'temporarily'non-adhesive.

- The heater m is suppbrted byja yoke I02 (a. i

Fig. 11) 'providedwith'a veruc ilug' 'lfl3'having its upper end pivoted at "l94on'the' end of ajlever I05 fulcr'umed at I06 in; an upright lll'vl extending -,upwardly from the baselplate 12 of the machine.

The edge of the lever llliisprovided-with aseries of notches mat-any o'neof which isadapted, to

be engaged by a pin I 08 in the end of an arm IIII which has its opposite end pivotally attached to the upper end of the upright I 01. A spring III connects the heater with a stud I I2 on the upright and acts to hold the heater properly positioned over the crinoline web and attached plasters. Through the arrangement by which the heater is suspended, the degree of pressure by it on the web may be adjusted, and the heater may be easily raised at any time during accidental machine stoppage to avoid singeing or burning the plasters then positioned beneath it. p

From beneath the heater IIII the crinoline strip and attached plasters next pass between two feed rolls H3 and 4 by which the strip and plasters are fed to the cutting knife indicated at I22. The lower feed roll H3 is mounted in bearings II5 extending upwardly from the base plate I2 and it is driven by a belt IIG extending from the pulley III driven by the gearing in the gear case III. The shaft I58 of the roll II3 carries a pulley I I8 about which the belt IIB extends. The upper roll H4 is mounted in the movable bearings H9 and is vurged toward its companion roll II 3 by the springs I20. A gear I59 secured on the shaft I58 meshes with and drives a similar gear I50 secured on the shaft of the upper roll I I4 so that the two rollsare rotated together. The roll II4 is-centrally hollowed and thus grips the crinoline web I5 only adjacent its ends and at the longitudinal edges of the web so that pressure of the plasters between the two-rolls is avoided. After passing between the two rolls II 3 and H4, the r web I6 and attached plasters-are fed through 5 edge guides I2I which present it to the cutting knife I22. The knife I22is carried on a crosshead I23 provided-with guides I24 which slide on vertical rods I25fconnected by the cross-piece I25. A vertical rod I21 extends upwardly from the cross-head I23 and is connected to or else forms the core I28, of an electro-magnet I29,

- the conventional windings of which are shown at I33. This, magnet is connected to a suitable source of electric current and is energized intermittentfy to cause the knife I22 to be forced downwardly to sever a section of the crinoline strip. bearing a required number of the plasters. Springs I3I extending between the cross-head I23 and the cross-piece I26 normally hold the knife raised while the circuit to the magnet is broken. The knife I22 on-its descent co-operates "with a shoulder I6I on a supporting plate I52 to sever the.strip into lengths. A plate I63 extending diagonally outward from one 9f the guIdes-J2I and overlying the strip I8, prevents the strip from rising upward upon the ascent "of the knife.

The means for closing circuit to the magnet -is shown in detail in Figs. 12 to 14 inclusive. On 50 its rear edge; the movable die head 62 carries a downwardly extending plate I32, adapted upon the descent of the die, to impinge against a pin I33 projecting laterally from a rocking lever I34 loosely mounted on a stud shaft I35 rotatably 6 supported in the bracket I38. At its other end, the lever I34 carries a pawl I31 adapted to engage f a ratchet I38 secured on the shaft I35. Secured omthe shaft I33 isa cam I39, which in the form x shown, is square in cross section. Each of the 7 four corners or edges I40 of the camsuccessit'ely operates against a spring contact I and causes chine, I have described it in connection with the it to close circuitwith another contactl42 which resultantly closes the electric circuit'to the mag- ,net, causin thelgnife' I 224:0 descend and cut oil! asectionofthecrinolinestrip. Thetimingof the feed mechanism and the descent of the knife are so correlated that the cut occurs between the rows of plasters on the strip. By the shape of the ratchet 95 and the shape of the cam I 38, the length of the strip cut, and resultantly. the 5 amount of plasters on eaclisevered strip, is regulated. I I

In some instances, it may be found desirable to cut single rows of plasters from the strip. In such a case, the simple circuit-closing arrange- 10 m ent shown to the left of Fig. 13 for the magnetic knife, may be used rather than that heretofore described. In this arrangement the die plate or head 62 carries a dependent rod I44, which, on each descent of the die head contacts with a spring contact I45 causing it to close circuit with another contact I45 and thus energize the magnet. When this switch, consisting of the contacts I45'and I48, is connected in the magnet circuit, the otherswitch composed of the elements 20 I 4| and I43, is removed from the circuit.

Briefly, the operation of the machine is as follows: v v

The web I 8, fed from the reel I3 extends under the feed roll 33 (or between the rolls 33 and g5 35 as shown .in Fig. 32 and then passes over the moistening roll 49 which applies a thin film of liquid to the sticky face of the web, acting to render this face of the web temporarily nonadhesive. When the part of the web which has 30 been so moistened reaches a position between the dies 5| and 52, the movable or upper die 5l descends, during a pause in the intermittent feed of the strip, and punches a row of the perforations 53 in the strip, at thesame time forcing the 35 waste centers 53a (Fig; 14) bodily out of the strip and down into the chute 51. The backing strip ll coming downwardly through the trans-, verse slot I5 in the die'head 62 moves co-extensively with the now perforated web I 0 and ad- 40 heres to the upper face of the same, covering the perforations 53 formed therein.- The die elements I8, co-operating with the complementary openings Iastamp out the annular corn plasters from the composite web made up of the adhesively united web I0 and strip I4. These plasters are forced bodily out of the composite strip and downwardly against the face of the warmed and dried crinoline web I8 by the die .elements I8, and they adhere to said strip and are carried 50 along on it. The composite strip shown at 81 is now waste materialand it passes over 8'. moistening roll 82 which moistens its adhesive face and it then passes between the feed rolls H and I3 which feed it to the driven take-up reel 88 5 on which it is wound. In the meantime, the 4 strip I6 of crinoline, carrying the-attached plastors are fed by the intermittently rotated feed on the slide I10 into a suitable receptacle.

In herein describing the operation of the mamanufacture of a certain type of representative f corn plaster. However, I do not wish; to be understood as-llmlting thsinvention to a machine 7 and method for manufacturing that specific type, since there are several different types of corn plasters and other protective pads which can be easily manufactured by the machine and method herein described. What I claim is: i

1. A machine of the, class described having means for feeding a web composed of a textile fabric provided with a sticky surface, means for temporarily rendering the sticky surface of said web relatively non-adhesive, means for perforating the web while it is in its relatively nonadhesive condition and'forcing waste material out of the perforations, means for adhesively uniting a fabric backing to the back" of the perforated web to form a composite web, means for punching plasters out of the composite web and simultaneously forcing said plasters out of the web, means for feeding a foraminous web adjacent to the composite web so that the-punchedout plasters are directed against the foraminous web by the punching operatioma heater, means for carrying the backs of the plasters against said heater while the plasters are attached to the foraminous web, and means for severing the foraminous web into lengths.

. 2. In a machine of the class described, means for feeding a fabric web having-a sticky surpunching means.

face, means for punching corn plasters out of said web, and means for rendering thetsticky surface of the web relatively non-adhesive before the web is fed to the punching means.

3. In a machine of the class described, means for feeding a fabric web having a sticky surface, means for punching corn plasters out of said web, means for rendering the sticky surface of the web relatively I non-adhesive before the web is fed to the punching means and means for restoring adhesiveness to the plasters after they have been punched out of the web- '4. In a machine of the class described, means for feeding a fabric web having a sticky surface, means for punching corn plasters out of said web, and means for applying a liquid to the sticky surface of said web to render said surface relatively non-adhesive before the web is fed to the 5. In a machine of the class described, means for feeding a fabric web having a sticky surface, means for punching corn plasters out of said web, means for applying a liquid to, the sticky surface of said web to-render it relatively nonadhesive before the web is fed to the punching means and means for applying heat to the punched-out plasters to restore adhesiveness .thereto. a

6. In a machine for making corn plasters and the like, means for feeding three fabric webs, means for perforating one of the webs, means for adhesively uniting it with a second web after it has been perforated, means forpunching out corn plasters from the two webs thus united and simultaneously forcing them out of the two united webs and directly into contact withthe third web to adhesively amx them thereto.

7. In a machine for making corn plasters and the like, means for feeding three fabric webs,

-- one of which is provided with a sticky surface,

means for applying a liquid to said surface to render it temporarily non-adhesive, means for perforating said web and simultaneously forcing;

the waste centers out of the perforations, means for uniting said perforated web with a second web, means for punching out corn plasters from the two webs thus united and, simultaneously forcing the plasters out of the body of the two united webs and directly into contact with the thi d web to adhesively aflix them thereto, and me carried on thet web.

8. In a machine f the class described, means for adhesively .uniti a perforated web and an imperforate web, punching dies, means for moving the united webs between the dies-to cause plasters'to' be stamped out of them and forced by the dies against the face of a web of foraminous material to cause them to adhere thereto.

9. In a machine of the class described, means for feeding a-web composed of textile fabric provided with a sticky surface, means for moistening the sticky surface of the web to render it re] tively temporarily non-adhesive, means for punching groups of perforations in the web and simultaneously forcing waste material out of the perforations and away from the web, means for adhesively applying a textile fabric backing over the back of the web, means for punching out plasters from the composite web thus formed and simultaneously forcingthe punched-out plasters out of and away from the compositeweb, means for feeding a foraminous fabric web co-extensive ly with the composite web so that the punched-,- out plasters are adhesively applied to said foraminous fabric by the punching dies, and means for severing the foraminous fabric web into lengths.

10. In a machine of the class described, means for fe'edinga web of foraminous material, means us for heating theplasters whilethey are for stamping plasters of adhesive material into contact with a face of the web, and means for heating the web as it is beingfedto plaster-receiving position thereby to drive out moisture from the web'and aid in causing adhesion of the plasters to the web.

- 11.' In a. machine of the class described, means or feeding a web composed of textile fabric pro vided with a sticky surface, means for moistening the sticky surface of the web to render it relatively non-adhesive, means for punching groups of perforations in the web and simultaneously forcing wastematerial out of the perforations while the sticky surface of the web is in a relatively non-adhesive condition, means for adhesively applying, a textile fabric backing over the back of the perforated web, means for punching out annular plastersv from the composite web thus formed and simultaneously forcing the punched out plasters out of and away from the composite web, means for feeding a foraminous fabric web co-extensively with the composite web so that the punched-out plasters are adhesively applied to said foraminous fabric by the punching dies,

means for severing the foraminous fabric web into lengths, and means for heating the plasters carried by said web. 12. A machine of the classdescribed having means for feeding a web composed of a textile fabric provided with a sticky surface means for moistening the'sticky surface of the web to render said surface relatively temporarily non-adhesive,

a die for perforating the web while said web is in its relative non-adhesive condition and forcing waste material out of the perforations simultaneously with the perforating operatiorL-means for feeding a second web having a stickysurface soo sive condition. y 14. In a machine of the class described, means.

so that the plasters punched out by the punch elements thereon are directly applied against the stamping plasters bodily out of and forcing them away from the fabric while it is in a non-adhefor moistening the surface of a sticky-faced fabric to render its normally sticlw surfacetemiporarily relatively non-adhesive, diesfor stamp- 15 ing plasters bodily out of and forcing them away from the fabric while it is in a non-adhesive condition, and means for restoring adhesiveness to the plasters after they have been stamped out.

2,088,786 v 15. In a machine of the class described, means for rendering the surface of a sticky-faced fabric temporarily and relatively non-adhesive, and

means for stamping plasters out of and forcing them bodily-away from the fabric while it is in such non-adhesive condition. 4

16. In a machine of the class described,'means for feeding a starched foraminous web into position to receive adhesive-surfaced plasters, means I for pressing such plasters into contact with one face of said web, and a heater acting upon the opposite face of said web being fed for driving moisture from said web and aiding in causing adherence of said plasters to said web.

GEORGE H. PERRYMAIi.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2418900 *May 19, 1943Apr 15, 1947Celanese CorpMethod of and apparatus for making cups
US2511559 *Nov 27, 1946Jun 13, 1950Presto Bandage CompanyMachine for making bandages
US2543678 *Oct 13, 1948Feb 27, 1951Radio Receptor Co IncMethod of producing rectifier elements
US2560566 *Sep 20, 1946Jul 17, 1951Contact Products IncMethod of making pressure sensitive labels
US2588087 *Dec 28, 1948Mar 4, 1952Mcbee CoMethod and apparatus for mounting film on cards
US2638983 *Apr 8, 1950May 19, 1953Congoleum Nairn IncApparatus for the manufacture of inlaid flexible smooth surface coverings and the like
US2680943 *Dec 31, 1948Jun 15, 1954American White Cross Lab IncBandage forming and wrapping machine
US2819656 *Oct 12, 1953Jan 14, 1958Eastman Kodak CoMethod and apparatus for making mounts for diapositives
US2823728 *Feb 16, 1956Feb 18, 1958Burton D MorganMethod and apparatus for making an adhesive bandage
US2940754 *Mar 29, 1957Jun 14, 1960Minnesota Mining & MfgApparatus for mounting films and other inserts in cards
US6206071 *Aug 5, 1998Mar 27, 2001Advanced Label Systems, Inc.Apparatus and method for applying linerless labels
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/511, 493/346, 156/265, 156/514
International ClassificationA61F13/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/063
European ClassificationA61F13/06C