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Publication numberUS2036051 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 31, 1936
Filing dateApr 7, 1934
Priority dateApr 7, 1934
Publication numberUS 2036051 A, US 2036051A, US-A-2036051, US2036051 A, US2036051A
InventorsKieffer John E
Original AssigneeKieffer John E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Indented shock absorbing cushioning or packing paper and method and apparatus for making same
US 2036051 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March ,-1936. J. E. KIEFFER 2,036,051

INDENTED SHOCK ABSORBING CUSHIONING 0R PACKING PAPER AND METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING SAME Filed April 7, 1934 3 Sheets-Sheet .l

.i 1 AlrLHH- u E.||. .l. q Ur. .IHI 11W 8. -IL U ml L 2 1 14 1 m M r.- |l FL n 0 um 10 U 0 0 :U rL rL .ll. 2 m m .L 3 n 3 U U -U U. U[ H z I. r m. J. m L J L G I FL 2 ll .IJ I -J I v 3 .L .L a mm u B B U BBB D 1 n, 1 a n l U 1 L 6 M 6 m 3 t E a U H m H F 1. mu us 0:0 D an. n w 1 m P FL r-- :4 m L. IL I m 9 0:0 U Du m a .n .2. "I." v 3 2 3 Fl FL 2 UD U U U USU U L y \r- 2L INVENTOR. JOHN E KLEFFER 4 BY ATTORNEYS March 31, 1936. J. E. KIEFFER 2,036,051

INDENTED SHOCK ABSORBING "CUSHIONING QR PACKING PAPER AND METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING SAME Filed April 7, 1934- 3 Sheets-$hpet 2 upq mus nu L l I l I FIG. 5

INVENTOR. JOHN E. KIEFFER g wromisy I March 31, 1936. J. E. KIEFFER 2,036,051

INDENTED SHQCK ABSORBING CUSHIONING OR PACKING PAPER AND METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING SAME Filed Apvil 7, 1934 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 FIG. 7

INVEN TOR. JOHN E. KIEFFER ZMwmm ATTORNEYS Patented Mar. 31, 1935 g 4 2,030,051 INDEN'lmsnocx A380 '6 cosmos" ING OB PACKING PAPER AND METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING SAME J John E. Kiefler, Ewing, Ind. Application April I, 1934, Serial No. 719.492

i 10 Claims. ((1154-43) The present invention relates to shock abscrbing cushioning or packing paper of the type which is provided on one or both oi its surfaces with a multiplicityoi more or less closely spaced 5 hollow'protuberances or indentations as distin-' 'guished from corrugations; Such paper is partlcularly well adaptedior wrapping and protecting-fragile articles such as glassware, and may also be used as a pipe covering and for covering floors or stairs under carpets.

In my prior patent (Patent No. 1,780,526 dated November 4, 1930), I have disclosed a material 0! this type in which the protuberances have been molded into the paper after it has been completely formed and after a substantial portion of its water content had been removed without materially decreasing its plasticity or causing the fibers to set in their-usual substantially flat condition, and prior to the final conditioning and setting of the fibers of the paper.- By molding the protube'rances in this manner I have found it possible to produce deeper indentations than had been made by prior processes and to impart to the product a previously unequalled rubber-like 'ing of the indentations or protuberances is reselected toillustrate the invention, the indenta-. tions on one side of the sheet are shown to be inv line in the breadth and lengthoi the sheet as well as diagonally oil-the sheet while the indentations on the other side of the sheet are shown 5 to be in line only in the breadth of the sheet.

However, I am not to belimited to this particular arrangement of the indentations, ior there are many other possible arrangements falling wit the essence of the invention. 10

Another object is toprovide a method for making an indented shock absorbing cushioning or packing paper in which the registration or nestduced to a minimum.

Still another object is to provide an apparatus for making an indented shock absorbing cushioning or packing paper in which the registration or nesting of the indentations or protuberances is reducedto a minimum. 20

Referring briefly to the drawings, Figure 1 is w an enlarged plan view ota small portion of material made according to the teachings of the present invention, the arrangement of protu'ber-- {525 resiliency normal to its surface. Indented paper as made prior to the present invention has one shortcoming; namely, it the material is laminated as by winding a web in a 1 roll or by stacking a number of sheets, the in- #3 dentations or protuberances oi the diflerent layances on the upper surface of the sheet being indicated diagrammatically by solid squares, while the protuberances on the bottcmof the sheet are indicated diagrammatically by squares in dotted lines;

ers tend to register and to nest in each other. For certain'uses and applications of indented paper, this is a-serious disadvantage, for nesting bi the indentations cuts down the amount of airspace between the layers, thus lessening to a considerable extent the shock absorbing andheat insulating properties of a lemiriatedsheet. Fur- =1thermore; nesting'oi' theindentations makes .it.

impossible to wind a welrso as to produce a roll 40 having a uniiorm circular cross-section. More! over, it is-exceedingly diflicult to separate nested sheets by hand, an operation which must be performed very rapidly in the placing of sheets between the articles being wrapped.

v The principal object of the present invention is to provide an indented shock absorbing cushioning or packing paper in which the registration or nesting otthe indentations-or protuberances In its very essence, the phase of the invention rendering the'ioregoing object possible of accomplishment consists in arranging the indentations or protuberances on at least one side of the sheet so that they are out-of line ina plurality s of directions on the sheet. In the t Figure-2 is a cross-section taken along line 8 2-2 01 Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a cross-section taken along line 3-3 of Figure 1; Figure '4 is a front elevation of a pair of indenting rolls and associated mechanism for producing the product of Figure 1; the arrangement of protuberances on each of the rolls being shown diagrammatically. by solid squares and the pro- 4 jection oi. the protuberances oi the bottom roll onto the top roll being indicated dit cally by means of squares in dottedlines;

"Flgure5isaviewsimilartoFlgure4oian alternative embodiment of a pair of indenting rolls and associated mechanism;

Figure 6 is'a view similar toFigure'5 of. an- 45 I other embodiment of indenting apparatus suitable for the purposes of the present invention; and .4,

Figure'lisaviewsimilarto Figurefioi'still another embodiment of indenting apparatus.

Reterring in greater detail to the drawings and particularly to Figures 1,' 2 and 3 thereohthe sheet 01' paper per seis denoted generally by'the numeral l. The upper surface of the sheetis provided with a ssriesotprotuberances 2 indlcated rather diagrammatically by means of solid squares. The lower surface of the sheet is provided with a series of protuberances 3 indicated rather diagrammatically by means of squares in dotted lines. The protuberances may take any polyhedral shape, such as forexample, cubes or hemispheres, without sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention. Obviously the protuberances of. one side of the sheet form indentations for the reverse side of the sheet, so that in the embodiment illustrated both sides are provided with protuberances and indentations. The spaces between the protuberances and indentations are substantially in the plane of the original sheet of papers.

It is to be noted that the protuberances 2 are in line, not only longitudinally and transversely of the sheet but also diagonally of the sheet. The indentations 3 are illustrated as being in line transversely of the sheet but out of line in every other direction. Taking the first transverse row of protuberances 2 as a reference line, it will be seen that the first transverse row of indentations 3 is in longitudinal alinement therewith, but that each succeeding transverse row of indentations 3 is shifted over slightly to the right until the fourth transverse row of indentations 3. With the fifth transverse row, the indentations 3 start shifting back to the left until in the seventh transverse row they are again in longitudinal alinement with the protuberances 2. This particular arrangement is repeated for the entire length of the material. It is to be noted that the amount of shift of the transverse rows of indentations 3 back and forth transversely of the sheet is equal to the distance between two contiguous longitudinal rows of protuberances 2.

In Figures 4 and 5 are illustrated two alternative forms of indenting rolls for producing the material of Figure 1. As illustrated in Figure 4, the two rolls are indicated by the reference numerals II and II. The top roll III is fixed on a shaft I2, to which shaft is also fixed the gear I 3. Thebottom roll II is fixedto a shaft Il to which shaft is also fixed the gear I5. These two gears mesh as indicated in order to transmit the rotation of one of the gears to the other. Sufilcient space is left between the two rolls for the purposes of the invention.

Each shaft is rotatively supported near its ends in the standards or frames I6 and I! which are provided with the proper bearings. One of the rails is also provided with means to shift it back and forth axially. In the illustrated embodiment, it is the lower roll II which is shown so mounted, but clearly either or both rolls may be mounted for axial movement. In Figure 4, the shaft ll of the lower roll has fixed to one of its ends the cam wheel II having a circumferentially disposed cam groove or slot I9. This slot receives the lug 2. carried by the stationary stand 2|. Thedesignofthecamissuehas toshiftthe lower roll back and forth axially a small distance, which may well be equal to the distance between two circumferentially contiguous rows of protuberances on the rolls.

The protuberances on tne upper roll are denoted by the numerals in, while those on the 6 lower roll are denoted by the numerals to. Bothsetaofprotuberancesarearrangedinrowsboth clrcumferentially and axially of the rolls. As the rdls rotate the cam causes the lower roll to shift 8 drawn between the rolls, the rows of indentations made by the lower roll will be shifted back and forth transversely of the sheet.

The same result may be produced by spacing the protuberances on one of the rolls so that they are arranged in rows axially of the roll but are out of line circumferentially of the roll. Referring to Figure 5, the two rolls are denoted by I0 and II', their shafts by I2 and Il', their gears by I3 and I5, and the protuberances by 2b and 3b. The ends of the shafts I2 and Il" are shown as being rotatively supported in the standards It and I1.

' The protuberances 2b on the upper roll III are arranged as in the first embodiment of the apparatus, i. e. in line both axially and circumferentially of the roll. The protuberances 3b on the lower roll II' are arranged so that they are in line only axially of the roll. Circumferentially of the roll II the corresponding protuberances of adjacent axial rows are out of line. Preferably each axial row of protuberances 3b shifts over slightly in one axial direction and then back in the other axial direction.

In both embodiments of the invention, the axial rows of protuberances of the lower roll when projected onto the upper roll fall in between the axialrows of protuberances of the upper roll (see Figures 4 and 5) and shift first in one axial direction relative to the axial rows of protuberances on the upper roll and then in the opposite direction.

In Figures 6 and 7, I have illustrated two alternative forms of apparatus in which both of the indenting rolls shift endwise as they rotate. Referring to Figure 6 the two indenting rolls are indicated by the numerals Ila and Ho. The top roll Ilia is provided with the protuberances 2c and the bottom roll II a is likewise provided with r the protuberances 30. Both of these sets of protuberances are arranged similarly to those of Figure 4; namely, in rows both circumferentially and axially of the rolls.

The two rolls Ilia and Ho are fixed to the shafts I la and Ila, the upper shaft I211 carrying the gear I3a and the lower shaft Ila carrying the gear I5a. The gears mesh to transmit the rotation of one roll to the other. The ends of the shafts Ila and Ila are joumalled in the vertical standards Ito and Ho. The ends of the shafts which are journalled at I to extend beyond the standard and are provided with the cam wheels Ila and 22. The lower cam wheel I80 is provided with a cam slot Ila. This slot receives the lug 20a carried by the stationary stand 2Ia. The design of the cam is such as to shift the lower roll back and forth'axiaily a short distance, which may be equal to half the distance between two circumferentially contiguous rows of protuberances, or to any small multiple of such distance.

The upper cam wheel 22 is provided with a cam slot 23 which receives a lug 24, which may be carried as shown in Figure 6 by the standard Ila. ,The design of the cam is preferably such as to cause the upper roll to shift back and forth axially a short distance in opposite directions to the shift of the bottom roll. The shift of the upperrollmaybeequalinlengthtothatofthebottom roll. conceivably the shift of both rolls may be in the same directiombut of such relative lengths as to produce a relative shift of the corresponding protuberances.

In Figure '1, an'arrangement is shown wherein the relative shift of the two rolls is produced by meshingcamwheels. Thetworollsaredesignated as Ilb and IIb and the two sets of protuberances as M and 3d. The prohiberanoeo on both rolls are arranged as in Figure d; i. e. in rows both circumferentially and axially of the rolls. the meshing gears by I3b and l5b. One end of each shaft is journalled in the standard 16b while the other end is journalled in the standard llb.

The ends of the shafts which are journalled in the standard l6b are provided with meshing cam" wheels lb and 22a. One of the cam wheels; e.. g. the upper one which is designated by the numeral 22a, is provided with a slot 23a while the other cam wheel l8b is provided with a circumferential rib 25 which is received in the slot 23a.

The design of the groove 23a and of the rib 25 are such as to cause the two rolls lllb and l l b to shift relatively to each other as they are rotated.

- The design may be such as to produce a shift .in its ordinary sense in the art; namely, as a sheet material formed by papermaking methods from an aqueous suspension of fibrous materials such as cellulose and/or asbestos which may be admixed with other vegetable, animal or mineral fibers to impart to the product other desirable properties.

' The foregoing constitutes the essential thought of my invention, but it is to be understood that its details may be modified in various ways, replaced by other details or combined with other concepts without departing from the spirit and scope of the following claims, in which I am endeavoring to cover all novelty inherent in the foregoing disclosure. 4

I claim:

1. As an article of manufacture, a shock absorbing cushioning or packing paper provided on one of its sides with a multiplicity of indentations, said indentations being arranged in rows, said rows of indentations being progressively offset -relative to each other, whereby the tendency of the indentations to nest when the paper is rolled is reduced to a minimum. 2. As an article of manufacture, a shock absorbing cushioning or packing paper provided on one of its sides with a. multiplicity of hollow protuberances and with a multiplicity of indentations, said protuberances being arranged in rows and columns and said indentations being arranged in rows, said .rows of indentations being progressively offset relative to each other, whereby the tendency of the protuberances and indentations to nest when the paper is rolled is reduced to a The shafts are denoted by I21: and Mb and 3. The article defined by claim 1, wherein the rows of indentations are equally spaced.

4. The article defined by claim 2, wherein the rows of protuberances are equally spaced.

5. A method for producing an indented shock absorbing cushioning or packing paper, the indentations of which will not nest when the paper is wound in a roll, said method consisting in passing a web of paper through the gap between two indenting rolls and simultaneously shifting one of said rolls back and forth transversely to the web.

6. An apparatus for producing an indented shock absorbing cushioning or packing paper, the indentations of which will not nest when the paper is wound in a roll, said apparatus consisting of a pair of rotatable indenting rolls spaced to permit the drawing of a web of paper therebetween and means for shifting one of said indenting rolls'back and forth transversely of the web of paper.

7. An apparatus for producing an indented shock absorbing cushioning or packing paper, the indentations of which will not nest when the paper is wound in a roll, said apparatus consisting of a pair of rotatable indenting rolls spaced to permit the drawing of a web of paper therebetween, each of said rollsbeing provided on its surface with a multiplicity of protuberances arranged in rows both circumferentially and longitudinally of the rolls and means for shifting one of said indenting rolls back and forth transversely of the web. of paper.

8. An apparatus for producing an indented shock absorbing cushioning or packing paper, the indentations of which will not nest when the paper is wound in a roll, said apparatus consisting of a pair of rotatable indenting rolls spaced to permit the drawing of a web of paper therebetween and means for shifting said indenting rolls back and forth transversely of the web of paper relatively to each other.

'9. An apparatus for producing an indented shock absorbing cushioning or packing paper, the indentations of which will not nest when the paper is wound in a roll, said apparatus consisting of a pair of rotatable indenting rolls spaced to permit the drawing of a web of paper therebetween, each of said rolls being provided on its surface with a multiplicity of protuberances arranged in rows both circumferentially and longitudinally of the rolls and means for shifting said indenting rolls back and forth transversely of the web of papen'rclative1y to each other.

10. An ap aratus for producing an indented g cushioning or packing paper, the f which will not nest when the paper is woi d in a roll, said apparatus consisting of a pair'of rotatable indenting rolls spaced to permit filiedrawing of a web of paper therebetween and means for shifting said indenting rolls in opposite directions back and forth transversely of the web of paper.

JOHN E. KIEFFER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2502112 *Dec 5, 1945Mar 28, 1950Fox Paper CompanyIndented paper manufacture
US4614632 *Dec 28, 1984Sep 30, 1986Nippon Petrochemicals Company, LimitedMethod and apparatus for continuously forming embossed sheets
US4902366 *Jan 11, 1988Feb 20, 1990Corovin GmbhProcess and apparatus for bonding and embossing sheet materials, particularly fiber matting
US5061232 *Apr 12, 1989Oct 29, 1991Scott Paper CompanyRolled paper embossing dispenser
US5316622 *Jul 16, 1992May 31, 1994Babinsky Vladislav AEmbossed or dimpled combined board
US5374468 *Mar 31, 1994Dec 20, 1994Babinsky; Vladislay A.Embossed or dimpled combined board
EP0149844A2 *Dec 27, 1984Jul 31, 1985Nippon Petrochemicals Co., Ltd.Method and apparatus for continuously forming embossed sheets
EP2463088A2 *Dec 8, 2011Jun 13, 2012Ronald JonesCushioned packaging materials
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/180, 428/537.5, 264/285, 156/582, 428/156
International ClassificationB31F1/00, B31F1/07
Cooperative ClassificationB31F2201/0753, B31F2201/0738, B31F2201/0782, B31F1/07, B31F2201/0733
European ClassificationB31F1/07