Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2036310 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 7, 1936
Filing dateDec 1, 1933
Priority dateDec 1, 1933
Publication numberUS 2036310 A, US 2036310A, US-A-2036310, US2036310 A, US2036310A
InventorsJohn F Werder
Original AssigneeEdmund Rogers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for measuring and dispensing liquids
US 2036310 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'mifl y 13. J. F. WERDER DEVICE FOR MEASURING AND DISPENSING LIQUIDS Filed D80. 1,.1953 2 Sheets-Sheet l.

A TTORNEYS.

J. F. WERDER DEVICE FOR MEASURING AND DISPENSING LIQUIDS Filed Dec. 1, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 i. HHHIHEHEHIHIIEHIHHHHHHIIIHH INVENTO A TTORNEYS.

Patented Apr. 7, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE John F. Werder, Lakewood, Ohio, assignor of onehalf to Edmund Rogers, South Euclid, Ohio Application December 1, 1933, Serial No. 700,625

13 Claims.

This invention relates to a device for measuring and dispensing liquids, especially lubricants charged with inert gas, although it may be employed for other liquids.

One object is to devise such an apparatus in which the measurement of the lubricant or other liquid is clearly visible and in which the liquid may be discharged from the measuring container under pressure.

Another object is to devise such an apparatus in which the reservoir and measuring container and the means for controlling the measuring and dispensing operations are arranged in a convenient and efficient manner.

A further object is to devise a combination of reservoir and measuring container together with an improved means of communication for passage of air between the container and reservoir during the operation of the device.

A still further object consists in devising an improved form of structure as hereinabove referred to in which sealed reservoirs may be employed one after another in this combination and in which there is provided a convenient and efficient means for installing the successive reservoirs.

Other objects will appear from the following description and claims when considered together with the accompanying drawings.

Fig. 1 is a view mostly in vertical section illustrating my device;

Fig. 2 is a partial view in elevation taken at ninety degrees to Fig. 1; and

Fig. 3 is an enlarged view of a part of Fig. 1.

The supporting structure comprises the upper casting l which is supported upon the legs 2. The reservoir 3 is supported upon the upper side of the casting I while the measuring container 4 is supported upon the lower side of the casting l.

The container 4 is formed by means of a glass tube which is placed between the upper casting and the lower casting 5 and is held in assembly therewith by means of the bolts 6. The lower casting has a seat portion 5 for the end of the glass tube and is also provided with a well portion 5*. The upper casting is also provided with a depressed-portion I to receive the upper end of the glass tube.

The reservoir 3 is connected to the upper casting by means of an attachment 1 which is threaded to the casting and may be threaded also to the nozzle 8 of the reservoir 3. Upon screwing the reservoir onto the attachment 1, the end of the attachment will rupture the frangible closure of the reservoir so as to thereby establish a discharge connection therefor. The casting I has a centrally disposed opening therethrough in line with the passage through the attachment 1, so that there is established a direct discharge passage for the contents of the reservoir to the measuring container.

The flow of the lubricant or other liquid through the discharge passage and into the container 4 is controlled by the valve 9 which has a leather facing for sealing engagement with its seat provided on the under side of the casting l. The brass cam portion 9 of the valve surrounds and is affixed to the lower part of the open-ended tube II] which extends through the liquid passage and is spaced from the wall thereof. The purpose of this tube is to afford air communication between the upper regions of the reservoir and measuring container, while there is afforded ample space around the tube II] for the flow of the liquid as it is supplied from the reservoir to the measuring container.

The tube I0 is normally held in raised position and as a result the valve 9 is held closed by means of the coil spring II which extends along the inside of the tube I0 and throughout the length thereof. The upper end of this spring abuts against the apertured cap II] on the upper end thereof and abuts at its lower end against the bottom of the well 5 of the measuring container. The spring ll surrounds the rod l2 which is fixed in the bottom of the well 5 and terminates at its upper end within the lower end of the tube In when in raised or extended position. 7

While the lubricant or other liquid is being supplied from the reservoir 3, the air which is thereby replaced in the container 4 will escape up through the tube It], and the tube I0 is provided with the aperture or apertures ll] so as to still permit such escape of the air even after the lower end of the tube In is covered by the liquid as it approaches its limit of supply to the measuring container.

The measuring container may be filled with the liquid to the point when it reaches the bottom edge of the annular flange I which depends from the upper casting I. When the liquid reaches this point, there is thereby formed a closed air pocket of annular form which prevents any further filling of the measuring container. In this way, there is established a definite and constant measure. It is to be observed that the aperture II] is located at a point above the bottom of the flange l even when the valve 5% is in lowered position.

The valve g is adapted to be opened by means of the plunger i3 which is suitably mounted in the upper casting and is normally forced to withdrawn or inactive position by means of the spring it which bears against the nut on the one end of the plunger is. The plunger 23 may be forced to active position by means of the lever which is rockably mounted upon the upper casting i, the lever having engagement with a cap nut on the end of the plunger l3. The movement of the lever 15 towards idle position is limited by engagement of the ear 66 of the lever with a part of the casting.

Engagement of the plunger l3 with the inclined or cam surface 9 of the valve 9 will cause the valve to move downwardly towards open position, it being observed that the plunger l3 extends at an angle of approximately 45 to the direction of movement of the valve, although this particular angular relation may be varied.

As a means for controlling the discharge of the liquid from the measuring container, I have provided an attachment on the upper casting for the hose H, the delivery end of which may have any suitable form of valve to be operated readily by the hand of the user. Within the upper casting I have also mounted the needle valve l8 for opening or closing the outlet through a passage in the casting. Into this passage there is inserted the discharge tube is which extends to a point near the bottom of the well 5 As above stated, the reservoir prior to assembly, has a frangible closure. Prior to application of the reservoir to the attachment '5, the tube iii is forced into the container and the attachment 5, the tube I I] having a length corresponding approximately with the combined height of the measuring container and attachment '1. The tube l8 may be forced into such withdrawn or collapsed position by compressing the spring H.

Then with the tube H3 in such position, the reservoir is applied to the attachment I and the frangible closure is ruptured, immediately upon having effected a sealing engagement between the attachment i and the nozzle of the reservoir.

As soon as the frangible closure of the reservoir has been ruptured, the tube if! is free to be automatically extended upwardly by force of the spring H, such upward movement being limited by engagement of the valve 9 with its seat. It is to be understood that the tube It! must project above the level of the liquid in the reservoir 3 when in full condition.

After the reservoir 3 has been placed in as sembly, the bands 53 which are pivotally mounted upon the upper casting at the points 20, are swung upwardly about the reservoir and clamped together at the top by means of the bolt 2! which extends through the bail handle 22. The handle 22 may be attached to one of the bands by means of the bolt 2| to which the other band may then be attached by means of the wing nut 33. Thus, an empty reservoir may be conveniently removed by releasing the bands 59 and then unscrewing the reservoir from the attachment "l. A new reservoir may then be assembled in the manner above explained.

Opening of valve 9 will permit liquid to flow by gravity from the reservoir to the measuring container which may be filled to the predetermined point as above explained. During such filling operation, the air in the container escapes through the tube In to the upper part of the reservoir so as to facilitate the flow of the liquid therefrom.

When this device is employed in connection with gas-charged lubricant, there will be more or less free gas in the upper part of the reservoir, the pressure within the reservoir being from approximately 50 pounds to approximately 75 pounds per square inch. Such pressure will expedite the flow of the lubricant from the reservoir to the measuring container, and as the lubricant is withdrawn from the measuring container, there will be more or less of the gas released and this free gas will afford effective pressure upon the surface of the lubricant for discharging the same without the use of any other pressure means.

It is to be understood that instead of using this device with gas-charged lubricant, it might be used also for measuring and dispensing lubricants by employing other pressure means.

During the entire operation of discharging the liquid from the measuring container, there is communication through the tube Ii] with the upper part of the reservoir, so that sufficient pressure is effective upon the surface of the liquid to permit its flow, regardless of the nature of liquid. In this connection it is observed that the aperture or apertures lo are above the highest level of liquid in the container.

As the gas-charged lubricant is transferred to the measuring container and later discharged therefrom, the pressure of the free gas is conserved within the device and is utilized to the greatest advantage by being transferred back and forth between the reservoir and measuring container during the performance of the successive operations. The measuring container may be marked with graduations so as to indicate the quantity of liquid withdrawn therefrom.

By discharging the liquid from the measuring container under pressure, whether with the pressure afforded by a gas-charged lubricant or by employing other pressure means in connection with the lubricant or other liquids, it is possible to have the discharge connection at the top of the container, with the result that the bottom part of the device is free of connections which might there become damaged. In the present form of device, the bottom part is free of any connections or other projections which might cause any inconvenience in handling the same.

Thus, I have devised a compact and conveniently arranged structure in which a sealed reservoir may be readily and effectively installed and in which a means of communication between the upper regions of the reservoir and measuring container may be established simultaneously with and as part of the operation of installing a reservoir in the device.

Also, in my present device, there is provided a visual meter which affords extremely efficient results.

What I claim is:

1. In a metering device for gas-charged liquid, the combination of a reservoir, a measuring container therebeneath, means of communication between said reservoir and container for transfer of gas-charged liquid by gravity from the reservoir to the container, and means whereby the liquid Will be discharged from the conaosasm tainer under pressure of the gas liberated from the gas-charged liquid.

2. In a metering device for liquids, the combinationof a reservoir, a measuring container therebeneath, concentrically arranged means of communication between said reservoir and container for transfer of liquid by gravity from the reservoir to the container and for escape of air or other gas from the container to the reservoir, respectively, and means for discharging the liquid from said container, said container having a pocket formed in the top part thereof, and said means of air or gas escape having an opening thereinto at a point within the height of said pocket.

3. In a metering device for gas-charged liquids, the combination of a reservoir, a measuring container therebeneath, means of communication between said reservoir and container for gravity transfer of liquid to be measured, and means for discharging the liquid from said container under pressure of the gas liberated from the gas-charged liquid, said discharge means being connected to the upper part of said container.

4. In a metering device for gas-charged liquid, the combination of a reservoir, a measuring container, means of communication between said reservoir and container for transfer of gascharged liquid from the reservoir to the container and for escape of air or gas from the container to the reservoir, respectively, and means for discharging the liquid from the container under pressure of the gas liberated from the gascharged liquid.

5. In a metering device for liquids, the combination of a reservoir, a measuring container therebeneath, concentrically arranged means of communication between said reservoir and container for transfer of liquid by gravity from the reservoir to the container and for escape of air or other gas from the container to the reservoir, respectively, said means extending from a point near the top of said container to a point, above the liquid level in said reservoir, and means for discharging the liquid from the container.

6. In a metering device for liquids, the combination of a reservoir, a measuring container therebeneath, means of communication between said reservoir and container for gravity transfer of liquid to be measured, and for escape of air or other gas from the container to the reservoir, said container having a pocket formed in the top part thereof, said means of air or gas escape having an opening thereinto at a point Within the height of said pocket, and pressure means for discharging the liquid from said container.

'7. In a metering device for liquids, the combination of a reservoir, a measuring container therebeneath, concentrically arranged means of communication between said reservoir and container for transfer of liquid by gravity from the reservoir to the container and for escape of air or other gas from the container to the reservoir, respectively, said means extending from a point near the top of said container to a point above the liquid level in said reservoir, and means for discharging the liquid from the container, said container having a pocket formed in the top part thereof, and said means of air or gas escape having an opening thereinto at a point within the height of said pocket.

8. In a metering device for liquids, the combination of a reservoir, a measuring container,

said reservoir being mounted above said container and having a communicating passage for transfer of liquid from the reservoir to the container, a tube extending through said passage and spaced from the Wall thereof so as to provide a concentrically arranged passage for air or other gas from the container to the reservoir, a valve mounted upon said tube and adapted to close said passage for the liquid, resilient means for normally holding said tube in raised position and the valve in closed position, means for opening said valve against the tension of said resilient means, and means for discharging the liquid from said container.

9. In a metering device for liquids, the combination of a reservoir, a measuring container, said reservoir being mounted above said container and having a communicating passage for transfer of liquid from the reservoir to the container, a tube extending through said passage and spaced from the wall thereof so as to provide a concentrically arranged passage for air or other gas from the container to the reservoir, a valve mounted upon said tube and adapted to close said passage for the liquid, a coiled spring extending upwardly from the bottom of said container and within said tube, the upper end of said tube having an abutment for said spring, means for opening said valve against the tension of said spring, and means for discharging the liquid from said container.

10. In a metering device for liquids, the combination of a reservoir, a measuring container, said reservoir being mounted above said con-' tainer and having a communicating passage for transfer of liquids from the reservoir to the container, a tube extending through said passage and spaced from the wall thereof so as to provide a concentrically arranged passage for air or other gas from the container to the reservoir, a valve mounted upon said tube and adapted to close said passage for the liquid, said tube being of a length approximately equal to the height of the container and said communicating passage, a coiled spring extending upwardly from the bottom of said container and within said tube, the upper end of said tube having an abutment for said spring, means for opening said valve against the tension of said spring, and means for discharging the liquid from said container.

11. In a device of the class described, the combination of a measuring container, an attachment on one end of said container for supply of liquid therethrough to said container, said attachment being adapted for connection to a reservoir having a frangible closure for puncturing engagement by said attachment, a vent tube slidably mounted in said attachment so as to be movable therethrough, said tube corresponding in length approximately to the combined height of the container and attachment, and a compressible resilient means normally forcing said tube so as to extend up through said attachment and thereby afford an outlet for air or other gas from the upper part of said container, said parts being so constructed and arranged that said tube can be withdrawn preliminary to application of the attachment to the reservoir and then permitted to automatically extend itself into the reservoir immediately upon connection of the attachment to the reservoir and rupture of the frangible closure of the reservoir.

12. In a device of the class described, the combination of a measuring container, an attachment on one end of said container for supply of liquid therethrough to said container, said attachment being adapted for connection to a reservoir having a frangible closure for puncturing engagement by said attachment, a vent tube slidably mounted in said attachment so as to be movable therethrough, said tube corresponding in length approximately to the combined height of the container and attachment, and a compressible resilient means normally forcing said tube so as to extend up through said attachment and thereby afford an outlet for air or other gas from the upper part of said container, and a valve carried by said tube and adapted to control the flow of liquid through said attachment, said parts being so constructed and arranged that said tube can be withdrawn preliminary to application of the attachment to the reservoir and then permitted to automatically extend itself into the reservoir immediately upon connection of the attachment to the reservoir and rupture of the frangible closure of the reservoir.

13. In a device of the class described, the comblnation of a measuring container, an attachment on one end of said container for supply of liquid therethrough to said container, said attachment being adapted for connection to a reservoir having a frangible closure for puncturing engagement by said attachment, a vent tube slidably mounted in the passage through said attachment and spaced from the wall of said passage so as to provide concentrically arranged liquid and air or gas passages, a coil spring anchored in the bottom of said container and extending along the inside of said tube and having an abutment at the upper end of said tube, a valve mounted upon and surrounding the outside of said tube and adapted to control the flow of liquid through said attachment, said valve being normally closed by the force of said spring, means for opening said valve, and means for discharging the liquid from said container, said parts being so constructed and arranged that said tube can be withdrawn preliminary to application of the attachment to the reservoir and then permitted to automatically be extended into the reservoir immediately upon connection of the attachment to the reservoir and rupture of the frangible closure of the reservoir, thereby simultaneously afiording air or gas connection of said tube with the upper parts of the container and reservoir.

JOHN F. WERDER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4523697 *Oct 9, 1981Jun 18, 1985Cadbury Schweppes LimitedLiquid dispensing package
US4570830 *Jun 28, 1983Feb 18, 1986Cadbury Schweppes, PlcGravity dispenser
US5503305 *Apr 13, 1994Apr 2, 1996Agsco IncorporatedReusable pressurizable liquid dispensing sphere
US6223791Oct 21, 1999May 1, 20013M Innovative Properties CompanyGravity feed fluid dispensing valve
US6354346Mar 1, 2001Mar 12, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyGravity feed fluid dispensing valve
US6367521Feb 22, 2001Apr 9, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyGravity feed fluid dispensing valve
US6450214Aug 31, 2001Sep 17, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyGravity feed fluid dispensing valve
US6488058Jul 19, 1999Dec 3, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyGravity feed fluid dispensing valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/330, 222/400.7, 222/518, 222/156
International ClassificationB67D7/60, B67D7/58
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/60
European ClassificationB67D7/60