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Publication numberUS2036482 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 7, 1936
Filing dateNov 17, 1934
Priority dateNov 17, 1934
Publication numberUS 2036482 A, US 2036482A, US-A-2036482, US2036482 A, US2036482A
InventorsLarson Philip R S
Original AssigneeLarson Philip R S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elastic shoe lace
US 2036482 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. W. S. LAWSUN ELASTIC SHOELAGE Filed NOV. 17, 19541 UNITED STATES ELASTIC SHOE LACE Philip R. S. Larson, Chicago, Ill. Application November 17, 1934, Serial No. 753,420

6 Claims.

This invention relates to shoe laces and more particularly to an elastic shoe lace, although certain features thereof may be employed with equal advantage for other purposes.

It contemplates more e of an elastic shoe lace of specially the provision such construction that alfords the desired characteristics utilizable to a great advantage in connection with lacing shoes for more lasting and comfortable wear.

Numerous types of shoe laces have heretofore been proposed and to some extent efforts have been directed toward an elastic tying member for lacing shoes, but these have not proven entirely satisfactory in view of certain disadvantages that accompany the use thereof in lacing shoes.

An elastic lace should b e of suflicient diameter to substantially correspond in size with the eyelets or apertures provided in the upper of shoes for lacing purposes, and yet the elastic tension should not be so great so fort and retain the shoe as to provide discomlaced against possible yielding during the diierent movements of walking locomotion. Consequently, an elastic lace must be capable of yielding to slight variations or tensions to afford maximum advantage and as such serve a fruitful purpose over the ordinary shoe lace that is essentially non-elastic.

One object of the present invention is to provide an elastic shoe lace that responds to slight variations in tension accompanying walking locomotion.

tying member that has the desired polygonal configuration and size Without creating undue tension.

Still another' object is shoe lace that comprises to provide an elastic a plurality of complemental rubber strands deiining a unitary core having a fabric cover therearound to maintain the strands in assembled relation.

A further object is to provide an elastic shoe lace that is of sufficient cross-sectional size to substantially correspond with the eyelets or apertures in the uppers of sufficient elasticity to yie movements shoes and yet provide ld with the necessary of walking locomotion.

A still further object is to provide an elastic shoe lace having a plurality of rubber strands defining a sectional core to maintain the Still a further object shoe lace having a plura defining a sectional core having a fabric cover strands in assembled relation.

is to provide an elastic lity of rubber strands having a fabric cover (Cl. .Z4-143) with rigid tips to maintain the strands in assembled relation.

Other objects and advantages will appear from the following description of an illustrative embodiment of the present invention.

In the drawing:

Figure l is a perspective view of a wearers foot and shoe provided with an elastic lace embodying features of the present invention.

Figure 2 is another perspective view showing the Wearers foot being removed from the shoe without untying the lace, this requiring yielding action of the shoe lace that remains tied at all times and also exemplifies the yielding action during Walking movement.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary view of a shoe lace embodying features of the present invention.

Figure 4 is a sectional view taken substantially along line IV-IV of Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a sectional view along line V-V of Figure 4.

Figure 6 is a sectional view taken substantially along line VI-VI of Figure 4.

The structure selected for illustration comtaken substantially prises an elongated elastic tying member Iii which figuration. The strands II have a central member I2 that is preferably though not essentially of square cross-section to extend axially through the tying member l0. A plurality of strands I3, I4, I5 and I6, in this instance four, are shaped to serve as complements of the axial strand I2 and define, in this instance, a circular periphery I'I in their complemental association.

To this end, the strands I3, I4, i5 and I6 are of irregular configuration so as to bound two adjacent surfaces of the axial strand l2 that are intersecting at its corners so as to completely enclose the axial strand I2 and provide a sectional elastic core of any desired exterior configuration to correspond in size and shape with the apertures I8 provided in the uppers I9 of shoes 2). In order to hold the strands i2 to I6 in their desired assembled relation and to render such unitary action for convenient lacing through the apertures I8 provided in shoes 2li, a fabric cover 2I confines the last mentioned strands and serves to protect such against frictional wear during the lacing of shoes or while operative for retaining the latter on the foot of the wearer.

The fabric 2| may be of any desired construction and is preferabiy woven around the mental strands l2 to i the elastic core. It is desirable, therefore, that the fabric cover 2l be flexible so as to permit yielding of the elastic strands and yet confine the same to maintain their assembled relation that facilitates the lacing of shoes and provides the necessary resistance to wear. It is worthy of note that substantially rigid lace tips 22 may be provided on the extremities 23 and 24 of the elastic lace l@ so as to facilitate entry and passage through the apertures i8 and further to preclude fraying of the fabric cover 2l.

The lace tips 22 may be of any desired metallic construction or for that matter may take the ferm of a fiber, special wax, glue, rubber or other composition that renders the fabric 2l rigid in the region of the extremities 23 and Ell of the shoe lace i9. With the use of metallic tips 22, these are preferably dented at uniformly spaced intervals as at 25 to provide attachment and preclude the removal thereof. The elastic strands and fabric cover 2i will be deformed in the r"- gions of the indentations 25 to correspond therewith, thereby holding the sectional core and fabric cover 2i in assembled relation against any possible fraying or displacement.

With the use of an elastic shoe lace of the type described hereinabove, maximum elasticity is obtained with suflicient durability and diametrcal size so as to correspond with the apertures I8 and yet alord yielding without undue wear incident to walking locomotion or the removal of the shoe from the foot Consequently, the lace l@ remains tied at al times and the wearer can remove the shoe or place such on the foot without untying the lace it or having such obstruct this accomplishment. The shoe will always conform with the walking movement of the foot 26 and still be comfortably associated therewith so as to provide maximum comfort and more lasting shoe lace performance.

The shoe is laced in the customary manner so as to snugly embrace the foot of the wearer, and thereupon a bow 2% is made so that the elastic effect of the lace if; will effect self-locking knot in view of the fact that the tying thereof stretches the lace, 'thereby precluding the accidental disappearance of the bow 27 or the untying thereof. This will afford uniform comfort to the wearer who may resort to high or low shoes whereon the elastic lace if) may be utilized. It will eliminate unnecessary binding as well as friction of the shoe in conjunction with the wearers foot during the various movements that compleinclusive, that comprise flex the lace EE) in consequence of walking locomotion.

The shoe 20 will wear more uniformly and be serviceable for a longer period when an elastic shoe lace IQ of the type described above is utilized in conjunction therewith. Due to the elastic lace I0, the shoe will give with the movements of the foot so as to afford freedom to the muscles and obvate undue strain thereon. Various changes may be made in the embodiment of the invention herein specifically described without departing from or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention as dened in the appended claims.

I claim:

l. A shoe lace comprising a plurality of elongated bare elastic strands that are complemental to each other to form a tying member of circular configuration, a textile thread woven around the assembled group of said elastic strands, and rigid tips on the extremities strands to maintain the latter in assembled relation to dene a tying member.

2. A shoe lace comprising a plurality of elastic strands that are complemental to each other to form a single tying member of circular crosssection, and a flexible cover around said tying member to maintain said strands in assembled complemental relation.

3. A shoe lace comprising a plurality of bare elastic strands that are complemental to each other to form a single tying member of circular cross-section, a flexible cover around said tying member, and rigid tips on the extremities of said tying member to maintain said strands in assembled complemental relation.

4. A shoe lace comprising a plurality of bare elastic strands that are complemental to each other to form a single tying member of circular cross-section, and a fabric woven around said tying member to maintain said strands in assembled complemental relation.

5. A shoe lace comprising a central elastic strand, a plurality of elastic strands complemental to each other to encircle said central elastic strand to form a single tying member, a flexible cover around said tying member to maintain said strands in assembled complemental relation.

6. A shoe lace comprising a central elastic strand, of square cross-section, a plurality of elastic strands complemental to each other and said central strand to encircle said central elastic strand to form a single tying member, a flexible cover around said tying member to maintain said strands in assembled complemental relation.

PHILP R. S. LARSON.

of said textile covered

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3059518 *Feb 28, 1956Oct 23, 1962Nelson Helen LBraided elastic shoe string
US5029371 *Jul 27, 1990Jul 9, 1991Rosenblood Kenneth LLocking device for elastic laces
US5638584 *Apr 8, 1996Jun 17, 1997De Anfrasio; AntoineAttachment and cable fastening device
US5832574 *Sep 10, 1997Nov 10, 1998Shin; ChungkilFootwear string end tightening acetate tube
US5996256 *Feb 26, 1998Dec 7, 1999Zebe, Jr.; Charles W.Footwear construction with improved closure means
US7287304Dec 20, 2005Oct 30, 2007Zebe Jr Charles WCam cleat construction
US8272110 *Mar 31, 2006Sep 25, 2012Dora ValenzuelaShoe lace
US8438774Aug 4, 2011May 14, 2013Lawrence C. SharpPistol cocking assistive device
US8549785Apr 10, 2013Oct 8, 2013Lawrence C. SharpPistol cocking assistive device
US20150047159 *Aug 15, 2013Feb 19, 2015Ping-Kun LinSlip-resistant shoelace
WO1992002744A1 *Jul 18, 1991Feb 20, 1992Kenneth L RosenbloodLocking device for elastic laces
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/715.3, 24/715.7
International ClassificationA43C1/00, A43C1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA43C1/02
European ClassificationA43C1/02