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Publication numberUS2041785 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1936
Filing dateMay 8, 1933
Priority dateMay 8, 1933
Publication numberUS 2041785 A, US 2041785A, US-A-2041785, US2041785 A, US2041785A
InventorsHarold A Smith
Original AssigneeElliott Rosen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin selector and slug rejecter
US 2041785 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 26; 1936. H. A. SMITH COIN SELECTOR AND SLUG REJECTER' Filed May 8; 1953 5 Sheets-Sheet l y 6, 9w H. A. SMITH 2,041,785

COIN SELECTOR AND SLUG REJECTER 4 Filed May a, 1955 v s Sheets$heet 2 HWMIETTMQ? YI 1936.. H. SMITH 2,041,785

COIN SEL E C'IOR AND SLUG REJECTER F i led May a, 1933 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 May 26,1936. A s nv 2,041,785

I COIN SELECTOR AND SLUG' REJECTER Filed May a, 1955 s Sheets-Sheet 4 May 26, 1936- H. A. SMITH COIN SELECTOR AND SLUG REJECTER Filed May 8, 1933 5 sheets-sheet 5 Patented May "26,, 1936 PATENT OFFICE COIN SELECTOR AND SLUG REJECTER Harold A. Smith, St. Paul, Minn., assignor of one-half to Elliott Rosen, St. Paul, Minn.

Application May 8, 1933, Serial No. 669,899

17 Claims.

My invention relates to a coin selector and slug rejecter, and means to prevent fraud by using a slug in place of a coin to operate any machine. I have illustrated primarily the coin selector and slug rejecter without showing its direct application to a coin operated machine. However, it will be apparent from this and other descriptive matter herein, that my coin selector and slug rejecter may be associated in any desirable manner with such machines or devices where it is necessary to use a coin to operate the same. The slug rejecting mechanism of my device is of a simple character and is adapted to be operated to reject a slug and prevent it from being used to operate coin controlled devices.- The rejecting mechanism may operate to reject the slug before it enters the coin controlled mechanism which operates the device.

.for preventing any kind of a slug from being used to operate a coin controlled apparatus, whether it be a telephone or a machine where a coin slot is provided. Further, my selector and rejecter may be associated with any coin operated mechanism for dispensing goods or articles sold through a coin operated machine.

Heretofore, slugs of various characters have been used to operate coin controlled devices, thereby fraudulently obtaining goods or service through the use of such slugs. These slugs have been made to closely imitate the coin of the denomination required and it has been almost impossible to stop the use of the same. Some of these slugs are formed with a hole therein, while others are of a disk-like nature, either having smooth faces orformed with printing or other fanciful configurations on the faces thereof.

These-last coins which have certain representations on the faces thereof, are made to simulate a coin or to indicate that the slug is of a certain value in merchandise or the like, but all of these slugs are made of the proper diameter to represent a particular coin of a certain denomination,

so as to imitate the same as closely as possible. These slugs are often made of approximately the same weight as the coin thatthey are designed to imitate, thus making it even more dimcult to detect them and cause the same tobe rejected before they manipulate the coin controlled device.

A feature of my invention resides in providing a coin selector and slug rejecter which is capable in the one device of detecting and rejecting a slug, whether it be smooth-faced or formed to imitate a coin,cr even if the slug is formed with a hole therein, and also to select the proper com A feature resides in providing a simple means in a manner to retain the same while the slugs in virtually any form are rejected. Therefore, I have provided a means with a wide range of utility in accomplishing results which I believe have not been possible heretofore in a single unitary selector and rejecter. While devices have been made to prevent the use of slugs, they have failed in not having suflicient range to prevent the use of almost any type of slug. With such old devices, it was only necessary for the operator to carry a variety of slugs and if one would not work, another one would probably do so. With my device, the operator is not able to use these different slugs, for any slugs will be detected and rejected so they are worthless, and 15 the proprietor of a coin operated device is there- .by protected in the use of the same.

These features and other details will be more fully and clearly set forth throughout the specification and claims.

In the drawings forming part of this specification:

Figure 1 illustrates a perspective view of a form of my coin selector and slug rejecter.

Figure 2'is an enlarged plan view of the same with the cover thereof removed.

, Figure 3 is an enlarged detail of a portion thereof.

Figure 4 is an enlarged perspective side view of my coin selector and slug rejecter, with a part of the walls thereof removed to show the inner mechanism.

Figure 5 is an enlarged central longitudinal section through the coin selector and slug rejecter.

Figure 6 is an enlarged sectional detail on the line 66 of Figure 2, without showing the outer casing.

Figure 7 is a similar section to Figure 5, showing the parts in another position.

Figure 8 isa detail section similar to Figure l, showing the parts in still another position.

Figure 9 illustrates a slug having a hole therein.

Figure 10 illustrates .a slug with smooth outer faces.

Figure 11 illustrates a slug which is formed with surfaces to simulate a coinand indicating a denomination thereon.

Figure 12 is an enlarged section through the body of another form of my coin selector and slug rejecter, (said section being approximately on the line l2-i2 of Figure 13).

. Figure 13 is a section on the line l3-l3 of Figure 12.

Figure 14 is an enlarged section on the line ll-Il of Figure 13.

Figure 15 is a section on the line l5l5 of Figure 14.

Figure 16 is a section on the line 'l6l5 of Figure 13.

Figure 17 illustrates a toll telephone box, showing my coin selector and slug rejecter attached thereto for each money denomination.

Figure 18 illustrates the die face in one form of my coin selector and slug rejecter, illustrating a .die formed to fit the buffalo of a buffalo nickel.

Figure 19 is an enlarged sectional detail of a portion of the form of selector illustrated in Figure 12.

My coin selector and slug rejecter A is illustrated as a unitary device contained within a suitable casing which is provided with a top HI, end walls II and side walls l2 and ii. The cover III is provided with a coin receiving groove l4 formed in the coin tube l5.

The drawings illustrate the coin selector and slug rejecter Aas a unit of itself and not attached to a coin operated device, because it will be apparent that the same may be attached in any suitable manner to fit various different coin operated devices, so as to be of the proper size and dimensions to operate therewith. There are a large variety of these devices and owing to the fact that it would not be practical to show them all, I have simply shown my coin selector and slug rejecter in its various forms and in larger detail, so as to more clearly illustrate the operation of the same and to'permit the parts to be more readily described.- I have, however,- shown one application of my coin selector and slug rejecter to an ordinary toll telephone box, as i1- lustrated in Figure 1'7.

The detector A is provided with an operating handle l5 which operates the trip I! to push the same forward into the dotted line position illustrated in Figure 3 and when the operating lever l6 reaches this inward position, the trip I1 is automatically released and permitted to be forced back into its original position. The operating lever I 6 can be then pulled out into position to be reoperated. As the rod I6 is pulled out, the shoulder l8 which operates the trip I! ratchets over the spring dog l9 of the trip H.

The trip lever i1 is mounted upon a transverse shaft 20 and is adapted to operate the same each time the hand lever I6 is forced inward. A lever 2| is mounted on the shaft 20 and is formed with a curved operating end 22 which engages the end of the vacuum cylinder B. A spring 23 holds the end 22 in engagement with the cylinder B. The backward movement of the lever 2| isladjusted by the set screw 24 carried in the end The vacuum cylinder B is supported by the bracket 25 which is secured to the bottom 26 by the screws 21. This frame is formed with a vertically extending wall portion 28 upon which the of the lug l8. This operation is of primary importance in carrying out some of the principles of my selector. Within the vacuum cylinder B. I provide a plunger 32 which is slidably supported in the vacuum cylinder and is normally caused to be held in projected position by the inner coil spring 33 which engages in one end of the cylinder 30 and against the shoulder ofthe collar 34 in the end of the plunger 32. This plunger 32 is provided with a sharp working face 35 which is adapted to engage against the coin or slug in the operation of the selector A, as illustrated in Figure 7. In this figure, the coin 36 is in position to be engaged by the sharp working edge 35 of the plunger of the vacuum cylinder B and the plunger is shown compressed within the vacuum cylinder while the vacuum 'cylinder is compressed within the base portion 29. The parts as illustrated here in Figure 7, show the same just prior to the moment of release of the lever l1 and before the vacuum cylinder B automatically is expanded by the spring 3|.

I have illustrated in Figure 9, a slug 3? which is formed with an outer annular bead around the faces thereof and a central opening 31'. In Figure 10, I have illustrated a slug 38 which is formed with smooth outer faces. In Figure 11,

I have illustrated a slug 39 which is formed with an annular head around the same, similar to a coin and also formed with printed matter thereon to simulate a coin, as well as to be provided with a numeral indicating the denomination thereof, such as 5. These figures illustrate some of the slugs that are commonly used to fraudulently operate coin operated devices.

The coin groove is formed to lead down to a position in axial alignment with the vacuum cylinder B. I provide a gate arm 40 which is pivotally secured at 4| to the wall 28 of the bracket 25, as illustrated in Figure 6. The arm 40 normally is held in the full line position illustrated so that the arcuated edge 42 will form a shoulder against which the coin 36 or any of the slugs 31, 38 or 39 will rest when they have been inserted into the coin groove I4. The gate Ill remains in the full line position until it is automatically tripped, whereupon it moves into the dotted line position. The tripping of the gate arm 40 takes place just prior to the tripping of the vacuum cylinder B and after the working edge 35 has engaged the coin or the slug.

The gate. is adapted to be tripped by the bell crank lever 43 which is pivotally secured at 43 to h a bracket supporting member extending forward from the wall 28 of the support 25. This bell crank operates the rod 44 in a manner to pull the gate into the dotted position illustrated in Figure 6. The bell crank lever is engaged on one end between the shoulders 45. The shoulders 45 are carried by the inner end of the rod which extends along below one side of the vacuum cylinder B. The inner end of the rod 46 is slidably supported to the under part of the base 29 of the cylinder B, while the front end of the rod 46 is slidably supported in the plate 4! which is mounted on the end of the cylinder B. The plate 41 engages with the coil spring 48 which in turn engages the'collar 49 on the rod 40, as the cylinder I B is compressed inward, causing the rod 35 to move the gate 40 into inoperative position after the working face 35 has engaged the coin or the slug. As the vacuum. cylinder B is released and caused to expand, the plate 41 engages against a 7 enemas coil spring 50 which is supported on the outer end of the rod 45 and is held thereon by the shoulder collar adjustably secured to the end of the rod 46. Thus, as the cylinder B is exanded, the shoulders 45 will pull the bell crank 43 back into the position illustrated in Figure 5, which will cause the rod 44 to push the gate arm 40 back into the full line position illustrated in Figure 6, forming a shoulder for a coin or a slug to hold the same in position to be tested as to its character.

I provide a means of detecting and rejecting a slug with a hole in it, which includes a hollow plunger 52 which is slidably supported in the.

plunger 32 and the cylinder B, as well as being concentrically positioned to the working edge 35 of the plunger 32.

A rod 55 is slidably positioned within the hollow plunger 52 and is formed with a pointed end 56 which is normally positioned within the washerlike end 54 of the plunger 52, asillustrated in Figure 5. The rod 55 is slotted at 51 and works over a key pin 58 to limit the sliding movement of the rod 55. An adjustable yoke head 59 is secured to the outer end of the rod 55 and is adapted to be engaged by the pin- 60 which is positioned on one end of an operating lever 6i, which controls the operation of the plunger 52 and the rod 55. The lever 6| is pivoted at 62 to the supporting bracket 63 which is mounted on the back of the wall 28 to hold the lever in operative position. The lever BI is adapted to be operated by the rod 64 which slidably extends through the wall 28 and which is formed with a yoke end 65 which pivotally and slidably engages the pin 66 on the end of the lever 6|. However, the end of the lever 6| which carries the pin 66 is normally held by the spring catch 61 in inoperative lockedposition, so that the lever 6| will not ordinarily operate unless this spring catch 61 is first released. The spring catch 61 is pivotally mounted at 68 and is formed with a shoe end 69 which is adapted to be engaged by the rod when the rod Hi is operated. The other end of the spring catch 61 is formed with a hook II which engages the extreme end of the lever Bl.

The rod 10 is normally held in the position illustrated in Figure 5 by-the coil spring 12 out of engagement with the end 69 of the catch 61.

Then when the cylinder B is compressed, the plate 41 will engage against the end of the rod Ill compressing the spring 12 and causing the catch 61 to be lever B I One end of the rod 54 is slidably mounted in the plate 41 and an adjustable collar 13 causes the rod to be operated when the vacuum cylinder B is expanded, causing the yoke 85 to pull on the pin 56 and reset the lever 6| into locked'position held by the catch 5']. A coil spring 'Mis secured to the end of the lever GI and acts to force the plunger 52 with the rod 55 into the open end of the plunger 32 when the catch 61 is released and the vacuum cylinder B'is compressed far enough to release the collar from the plate 41, as illustrated in Figure '7, so as to permitthe lever 6! to push the plunger 52 inward. This permits my selector to operate to engage a slug such as 3'! with a hole-in it, as illustrated in Figure 8, perreleased from the end of the is actuated due to a hole in the slug, however,

mitting the pointed end of the rod 55 to engage through the hole of the slug to support the same on the rod and permit the washer end 54 to automatically push the slug toward the working end 35 as the same recedes back into the position illustrated in Figure 5, thus automatically and virtually instantly kicking the slug over the dividing wall IS. The wall projects up from the bottom of the selector A and forms one side of ,the

slug ejecting chute Hi. The slug ejecting plunger 52 is pulled back quickly into its normal position by the rod 64 when the collar 13 is engaged by the backward movement oi. the plate ll in the expansion of the vacuum cylinder B. This operation causes the slug to drop into the chute l5, ejecting the same out of the selector A.

If a. slug such as 38 or 39 is inserted in the coin slot l4 and the selector is operated by pushing the handle l6 inward to compress the vacuum cylinder B,the working surface 35 of the plunger 32 will engage the smooth portion of the slug, sealing the end of the plunger 32 on the slug, and

' as the cylinder B is released by the trip H and caused to be expanded by the spring 3|, the vacuum in the cylinder B and in the hollow plunger 32 willbe sufficient to hold the slug long enough to carry it over the division wall 15 and drop it into the chute 16. Thus, the vacuum created in the cylinder B is suflicient to carry a non-perforated slug over the dividing wall I5 and drop the slug into the ejecting chute. The working surface 35 is sharp-enough to fit the surface of the non-perforated slug and the vacuum built up in the cylinder operates to carrya slug of this character into ejecting position. The ejecting mech-' anism including the plunger 52 and the rod 55 is inoperative when slugs of this character without-a hole are ejected by the selector A, because this mechanism is not needed to assist in the ejection of the slug, owing to the fact that the vacuum pulls the slug out of the coin slot fast enough to keep it from falling straight down through the coin slot and'into' the chute H, which is directly below the end of the coin slot l4. The ejecting plunger 52 with its piercing rod 55 remains dormant even though the catch 61 is released when operating against a closed slug or against a coin such as 36, and before the plunger 52 has time to be operated by the spring 14, the vacuum cylinder B has rei .irned to normal position and the collar 13 has been engaged by the plate 47 to prevent the lever ill from operating. A slight movement of the cylinder B is suificient to operate the catch 61. When the rod 55 the lever 5| has been moved out of latching position by the spring 14. This is important in the operation of this mechanism of my selector A because if this were not true the plunger 52 might push a coin over into the ejecting chute I6.

When a coin is dropped into the slot l4, it will be engaged by the gate arm 40 and. held in this selecting position until the lever I6 is operated,

causing the working end 35 of the plunger 32 to 5 The fact that 6 engage the surface of the same. the coin has an irregular surface like a buffalo. nickel, prevents the vacuum from being built up in the cylinder B to a sumcient extent to draw the coin over the division wall 15. Thus, after 7 the cylinder B is released, the coin 36 will drop straight down into the coin chute 11 and out of the bottom or the selectorA into position to operate a coin controlled device or to ring the bell in a telephone box C. v

The selector units A may form a part of the coin box C of a toll telephone, as illustrated in Figure 1'1, there being an individual selector for each denomination such as 5, etc., if it is desired. It is also apparent even though it is not illustrated herein, that a separate selector plunger 82 may be provided for each denomination of coin in the telephone box C with a single operating lever such as i8 and a single vacuum cylinder B, which may be connected in a suitable manner to operate singularly with the vacuum directed to the coin slot wherein the coin is dropped. The slug ejecting chute 16 may be connected to the coin return chute 18 of the coin box C so that should an operator place a slug in any of the respective slots for the coins in the box C, and the lever I6 is operated to release the same into the coin box, the slug will be immediately returned into the coin return chute 18.

The vacuum cylinder B is connected with an air check cylinder D positioned on one side of the same and supported on the wall 28, in which the plunger 18 operates through the rod 88 which connects with the plunger and the plate 41, so as to check or cushion the expanding movement of the cylinder B.

My selector A may be made in the form illustrated in Figures 12 to 16 respectively, wherein the coin. selectors E may be provided with die faces 8| which are formed with virtually the identical die formation to fit the particular coin that is adapted to be used in the coin slot l4. The formation of the die faces 8| is more fully illustrated in Figure 18 which shows the design of the die to be used in the selectors E where they are designed to select a buffalo nickel. The selectors E are normally spaced apart as illustrated in Figure 12, on each side of the coin slot |4. When the coin or buffalo nickel 38 is dropped into the slot l4, it is adapted to be stopped by the gate levers 82. The levers 82 are pivoted at 83 and hold the coin in selecting position. If a slug is dropped into the slot |4, it will be held by the arms 82 in the same manner. In this form-of the coin selector A, a hand or power operating rod I8 is also employed which operates the tripping lever l1. The lever I1 is keyed to the shaft 28 which extends between the sides of the casing, as illustrated in Figure 13. This shaft 28 operates to control the setting of the selectors E so as to bring them simultaneously into contact with both sides of the coin 88 or a slug dropped into position to be selected.

A yoke lever 88 is connected to the shaft 28 and extends virtually equally on either side thereof and is connected by the links 84 to the brackets 85 which are positioned in staggered relation within the casing of the selector and rejecter A. The upper ends 88 of the brackets are threaded to the sleeves 81 with a comparatively steep pitched thread, so that the sleeves 81 may be rotated by the movement of the brackets 85 after the brackets 85 have reached a predetermined point. The sleeves 81 are rotatably mounted upon the hollow shafts 88, the inner end of the shafts 88 being closed at 88. The hollow shafts 88 are connected by the tubes 88 to the respective vacuum cylinders 8|, there being a separate vacuum cylinder 8| for each tube 88 and shaft 88.

The vacuum cylinders 8| are constructed as illustrated in Figure 14 which shows a section through one of the cylinders, wherein an air check valve 82 is positioned in one end of the sliding cylinder portion 84 of the vacuum cylinder is carried by the lower end of the arms 88. Figure 14 shows the cylinders 8| expanded and at the height of their vacuum, whereas Figure 12 shows one of the cylinders 8| telescoped with the portion 84 slid virtually over the sleeve 88. The staggered relation of the vacuum cylinders 8| is illustrated in Figure 15. Guide rods 8! guide the cylinder portions 84 which form the lower ends of the brackets 88 on the outside of the cylinders 8|, whereas a common guide rod 88 is positioned between the same and a coil spring 81 carried on the rod 88 acts to normally force the cylinders 8| into telescoped position, as illustrated in Figure 12. In moving into this position, the check valve 82 exhausts the air from the cylinders.

The selector A in this form is provided with a slug chute 88 which is positioned directly below the selecting position for the coin or slug, as illustrated in Figure 12, so that when the gate levers 82 are moved apart, if one of the selectors E has not removed the member or element dropped into the position between the gates 82, it will drop directly into the slug ejecting chute 88. The slug ejecting chute projects out to one side of the selector A so as to discharge the slug out of the selector when it drops into the chute 88. I provide a coin receiving chute 88 which projects on either side of the top end of the slug chute 88, but which extends out in the opposite direction and is adapted to carry a coin dropped into the same, out on the opposite side of the selector A and to deposit the coin in any suitable receptacle or in position to operate a coin controlled device.

Thus, when the selectors E are brought up into contact with the faces of the member dropped into the coin slot I4 and held in the position illustrated in Figure 16, if the selectors E fit either face thereof, such as the buffalo of a nickel like the die design illustrated in Figure 18, the selector fitting the same should act to draw the coin to one side or the other of the slug chute 88. If neither of the selectors E select the element from the selecting position, it is a slug and it will be left to fall straight into the slug chute 88 and be thus ejected.

The faces of the selectors E which are formed with a die to fit the respective coin to which the dies are adapted to engage, are formed with a series of perforations |88 to permit the vacuum set up in the cylinders 8| to operate through the connecting pipes 88 and the hollow shafts 88, to draw the coin properly fitting into the selector E by vacuum to one side of the chute 88, so that the coin may be dropped into the coin chute 88 when the vacuum ceases. The be]. low shafts 88 are provided with a hole |8l which is adapted to align with a slot I82 formed along the inside of the sleeve 81, only when the selectors E are brought together, as illustrated in Figure 14, fitting against either side of a coin or slug. Thus. a vacuum in the hollow shaft 88 becomes effective through the openings III to engage the coin fitting in the die face 8| and hold the same until the selector E moves back into the position illustrated in Figure 12, whereupon the vacuum is broken or has subsided to drop the coin 88 into the chute 88.

In operation, when the power lever I8 is operated to rotate the shaft 28, the yoke 88 will draw the links 84 around the shaft 28 sufilciently to pull the brackets 88 toward each other, bringing the selectorsE against the respective sides of the coin 36. After the selectors E havecome in contactwith'the faces of the coin 36 and'the shaft 20 is further rotated, the threaded connection between the ends 86 and the threaded Sleeves 81 will cause the sleeves 81 to begin to rotate, and thereby rotating the selector headsE and rotatingthe die faces BI on the coin 36 in opposite directions. As soon as'either of these die faces fit the coin, the coin will be rotated with the same, until the ends 86 of the brackets have moved towards each other the limit of travel in the operation of the shaft 20. The threaded engagement between the ends 86 and the threaded sleeve 81 is suiiicient to rotate the die faces BI of the selector heads E a complete rotation, thereby always insuring, fitting the face of the coin, no matter how the coin is dropped into the slot I4. Thus, as only one side of the coin may fit the. die faces at a time, one of the selector heads E will draw the'coin by vacuum to one side the shaft 20 stops by the tripping lever !1 disarated by the tripping lever I'I.

engaging from the operating power lever I6, the" spring 91 then operates to separate the selector heads E and causes the rotation of the sleeves B'I'and the heads E after they have moved back against the supporting brackets I 03.

In the operation of the selector heads E, the gate arms 82 are released from holding the coin 36 or the slug, the moment that the selector heads E engage the same. It is also apparent that the heads E 'hold the coin or the slug between the same until the selector heads are sep- With this construction of the selector A, where the die faces M are of a true formation to'fit the coin, such as a buffalo nickel, a dime, a twenty-five cent piece, a fifty cent piece or a dollar, or any other suitable coin, or member adapted to be used as a coin having a particular die face, it is apparent that; only when the proper coin or memher is used to fit the, die, is it possible to deposit the same into the coin chute 99. If a slug like 31, 38, or 39, or any other similar slug which does not have the proper die face on one side thereof to fit the die face BI, is endeavored to be used in this form of the selector A, it will not be picked up by the vacuum in the selector heads E and thus, it will be dropped the moment that the selector heads separate, falling directly into the slug ejecting chute 98 which rejects the slug out of the selector A. 1 V

The gate levers 82 are operated on their pivot points 83 by the link I04 which is pivoted at I05 so as to be rotated by being engaged by the power rod I6 to rotate the link I04 inthe direction of the arrow illustrated in Figurelfi. When the link 104 is rotated in this manner, the connecting link I06 which connects with one of the gate arms 82, will be moved into open position, while the link I0'I will move in the opposite direction to the link I06 and through the connection of the link I01 with the linki08, illustrated in Figure 13, the other gate arm 82 will be moved into' open position. A suitable spring means holds the link I04. normally in the position illustrated in Figure 16. As "the power rod I6is pushed against the link I04, it will open the gate arms 82 just prior to releasing the tripping lever I1. The mechanism operates quickly when it is tripped and a selection or rejection is made of the coin or slug which has" been deposited in the selector A.

The coin selector and slug ejector A in this last form is. positive in operation and will operate to absolutely prevent the use of a slug in place of a predetermined coin, where the die face 8| is made of the same formation as the face of the coin. Thus, the efliciency of my selector and slug rejecter will be readily apparent, wherein it is possible for me to provide a perfect coin selector and slug rejecter, thereby providing a means of protecting coin operated devices with my selector, The facsimile die face of the predetermined coin to be selected is an important feature of my invention and insures a perfect operation in selecting the coin, as well as a perfect operation in rejecting a slug. The only way that a slug could beat my selector would be to have the same formed with die faces identical to the coin to be selected. It will also be apparent that my selector is very efficient in its operation, owing tov the fact that no matter which way the coin is inserted in the coin slot it, either one of the other selector heads E will pick it up and carry it into the coin chute 99, retaining the same to operate the coin operated mechanism with which my selector is associated.

It is also apparent that the drawings are only illustrative to describe a mechanism of the character set forth and to illustrate a means of carrying out the principles thereof, and it is obvious that the selector can be made just as small as desired and with the parts arranged'in any suitable manner to carry out these principles of selecting a coin and rejecting any slug of any nature what'- soever, thereby preventing fraud in the use of slugs.

I claim:

1. A coin selector comprising, means for selecting a predetermined coin including a die having a configuration to fit the predetermined coin, and

vacuum means holding the coin in said die to seporting means, whereas a slug in the selecting p0-, sition 'Will be automatically rejected when said vacuum means fails to select the same by reason of it being a slug, thereby causing the slug to automatically drop out of said selector to reject it.

3. A coin selector and slug rejecter comprising, means for receiving a predetermined coin and holding it in selecting position, said holding means also acting to supp'ort'a slug in a similar position, die means adapted to engage the face of the coin or the slug, means for changing the relative rotative position of the coin or slug and the die, said die'having the formation of the predetermined coin and adapted to fit the same automatically upon being moved into proper position against the coin, and vacuum means acting to remove the proper coin from said selecting position, said die and vacuum means being ineffective on a slug, means for releasing said holding means subsequent to the actuation of said vacuum means and therefore rejecting the same ut of said selector.

4. Acoin selector including, means for receiving a predetermined coin and adapted to hold the same in selecting position, die means having a configuration conforming to the surface of the coin for selecting the proper predetermined coin to retain the same in said selector, and means in said selector adapted to reject a slug, whether it be smooth-faced, whether it has imitation faces of the proper predetermined coin, or whether it has an opening in the same.

5. A coin selector including, means for holding a predetermined coin in selecting position, coin engaging die means having a configuration to fit the face of the predetermined coin, means for adjusting said die means to the face of the coin to fit the same, and vacuum means for drawing the coin into selected position, said coin selector means acting to reject a slug or imitation coin. 6. A coin selector and slug rejecter including, die means having a configuration conforming to the surface of the coin for testing the face of a predermined coin by engagement therewith, means for selecting and retaining the coin if it is proper, and means for rejecting any imitation coin to discard the same by failure to correspond with the configuration of the proper predetermined coin.

'7. A coin selector and slug rejecter including, means for holding the coin or the slug in selecting position, a coin selecter means adapted to be brought in contact with the faces of the coin, having means engageable with and operable over the entire coin surface 'wherein if the coin is proper and true to select and retain it in said selector, and means for actuating said coin holding means for rejecting the slug when it is detected, whether the slug has a coin imitation surface or has a hole in the same, and whether the slug is smooth-faced.

8. A coin selector for a predetermined coin and a slug rejecter including, means for engaging the face of the coin or the slug, and vacuum means adapted to select the proper coin to cause the same to be retained in said selector, said vacuum means being ineffective on an imitation coin of the predetermined denomination on which said selector and rejecter is adapted to operate.

9. A coin selector and slug rejecter including, means for receiving and holding the coin or slug in position to be selected or rejected, a source of vacuum and vacuum means connected with said source of vacuum for selecting or rejecting the coin or the slug, said means comprising means for rejecting a smooth-faced coin orslug, and a slug made with irregular surfaces not identical in every respect with the surfaces of a coin.

10. A coin selector and slug rejecter including, an adjustable die-faced selecting means having a die adapted to fit a coin of a predetermined denomination, and vacuum means adapted to co-operate with said selebting means to select the proper coin by contact with said die-faced selecting means and to reject a slug, said vacuum means being ineffective on a slug.

11. A coin selector including, means for receiving and supporting a coin in selecting position, a pair of coin engaging members, each having a die face formed therein adapted to fit the died-out face of the coin to be selected, and vacuum means operable with said pair of members with said died-out faces to become effective upon either of said died faces fitting a similar died face on the coin, to select the coin by fitting the face of the same and drawing it by vacuum out of selecting position, means for releasing said coin supporting means to reject the coin by a non-fitting engagement if the coin is false or a slug.

12. A coin selector comprising, a coin receiving and holding means for a coin of a predetermined denomination, selector dies, means for moving said selector dies in contact with the faces of the coin, and vacuum means adapted to select the coin by adhering the same to either of said selector dies with which the coin fits, and means for releasing said holding means to reject the coin if it is a slug or of a character to be unaffected by the vacuum selector dies.

13. A coin selector and slug rejecter including, a pair of vacuum selector die heads, means for bringing said die heads against the face of the coin to be selected, means for creating a vacuum in said die heads at the moment that said die heads have reached selecting position, and means for rejecting-a false coin or slug by failure to be picked up by the vacuum formed in said die heads.

14. A coin selector and slug rejecter including,

means for supporting a coin in selecting position,

die head vacuum selector means for engaging the faces of the coin, means for creating a vacuum in said die heads which is adapted to select the coin if it is of the proper denomination and die-faced configuration, and means for releasing said coin supporting means to reject a false coin if it does not conform with the die-faced configuration required by the die head vacuum selector means.

15. A slug rejecter including, means for receiving and supporting a coin or slug, means for testing the face configuration of the same and if found to be false and of a slug nature to be rejected, and if true to be retained, means for moving said supporting means out of operating position, said testing means including vacuum means.

16. The combination, a coin slot for a silver coin of a predetermined denomination, means in said slot for supporting the coin, means for engaging the face of the same to test the configuration thereof to determine if it is of a true character, and means for applying a vacuum whereby if the coin is of a true character, it will be selected in position to be retained, and if it is false, it will be rejected from said supported position.

1'7. The combination, a series of coin slots for HAR;oLD A. em.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6401934Oct 30, 1998Jun 11, 2002Tuboscope I/P, Inc.Ramped screen & vibratory separator system
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/330, 194/332
Cooperative ClassificationG07D5/005
European ClassificationG07D5/00P