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Publication numberUS2042127 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1936
Filing dateOct 1, 1934
Priority dateOct 3, 1933
Publication numberUS 2042127 A, US 2042127A, US-A-2042127, US2042127 A, US2042127A
InventorsSharrock Henry
Original AssigneeIci Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for the treatment of gases or vapors with liquids
US 2042127 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1936- H. s. SAYLES 2,042,127

APPARATUS FOR THE TREATMENT OF GASES OR VAPORS WITH LIQUIDS Filed Oct. 1, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR HergySharrnck 5 a 1. 1'E5 y 26, 1936- H. s. SAYLES 2,042,127

APPARATUS FOR THE TREATMENT OF GASES OR VAPORS WITH LIQUIDS Filed Oct. 1, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIGURE- E.

. FIEUR'EQIf jjjjj) Haw Sharrut$5 FIGURES- ATTORNEYS.

Nrrs STATES ATENT APPARATUS FOR THE TREATMENT OF GASES OR VAPORS WITH LIQUIDS Henry Sharrock Sayles, Norton-on-Tees, England, assignor to Imperial Chemical Industries Limited, a corporation of Great Britain Britain October 3, 1933 Application October 1, 1934, Serial No. 146,468-

, In Great scams. car-112i This invention relates to apparatus in which gases or vapors are passed into contact with liquid films flowing over packing composed oi! a plurality or vertical sheet elements arranged transversely in superimposed tiers, such for example, as in gas washing tor the removal of solid matter and/or undesired gaseous constituents. the absorption of gases in liquids, the cooling of liquids, distillation, rectification, or chemical rere actions in whichintimate contact between gassons and liquid reactants is desirable. r

'In such apparatus it is important that substantially the whole of the liquid should flow down the surface of the packing in film formtion since the free fall of liquid between the elements, hereinafter referred to as cascading, results in a serious loss of efilciency.

According to the present invention, apparatusof the kind described includes means for delivering liquid in film formation to the packing eler'nents, comprising collectors consisting or two or more closely adjoining files or rows or parallel inclined sheets arranged one behind the other, adjacent rows being inclined in opposite direc-- tions and adjacent sheets in each row being inclined to such an extent that there is no vertical passage between them, so that liquid delivered from above the said collectors is distributed over both sides of the subjacent packing elements without appreciable cascading and without substantially restricting the flow of gas or vapor.

The collector sheets may be used in conjunction with any approved form of distributor to deliver the liquid on to the uppermost tier of the packing, the sheets being inclined to such an extent that there is no vertical passage between adjacent sheets in each row. The lowermost edges of the sheets must be so placed relative to the uppermost tier of the packing elements that the liquid falling from the collector sheets is directed on to the surface of the packing; thus the lowermost edges of the sheets may touch the top of the packing elements, or if desired the sheets may be made integral therewith. It is important that the rows of sheets should adjoin as closely as possible since otherwise the gaps would permit a free fall of liquid through the packing. I The packing may be composed of a plurality of vertical metal sheet elements arranged transversely in superposed tiers, and each tier may interlock with adjacent tiers by means of slits in the component vertical sheets, the whole or part of the tongues formed by the slits at the top of each oi. the sheets forming each tier being inclined alternately in opposite directions to term collector sheets.

The width of the collector sheets is preferably small compared with the width 0! the subjacent packing elements to which they deliver liquid, 5

so that the liquid is distributed substantially uniformly over botl sides 01 the said packing elements. Collector sheets may be provided at the top of each tier oi' packing elements, and this is especially advantageous when high rates 0! 1o liquid fiow are used, since otherwise the liquid is liable to cascade instead of flowin from tier to tier in filmiormatlon.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. l is an elevation of several tiers of elements -and collectors embodying this invention.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of portions of three of the packing elements and collectors belonggo I ing to three separate tiers of the elements shown in Fig. l,

Fig. 3 is a perspective viewof a modified form of the invention, and

Figs. 4 and 5 are end elevations or profile views of modified forms of collectors.

Referring to the drawings, more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, the packing comprises a number of vertically disposed rectangular plane sheet elements 1 of suitable metal, such as aluminum, 30 arranged in superposed tiers, the elements in each tier being substantially parallel to one another and arranged in contact with and transversely to those in the next tier, said elements being provided with equally spaced slots 2 along 86 their upper and lower edges.

As has been previously emphasized an important feature of this invention resides in the provision of means for delivering liquid in film formation to the packing elements in such a way 40 that cascading is minimized and, maximum efficiency is attained without substantial restriction of the flow of gas or vapor. In the present instance, such liquid delivery means comprise collectors'or collectingplates or sheets 3, which 4 in the upper edges of the elements I in one tier with the slots 2 in the lower edges of the elements in another tier. Thus a plurality of closely adjoining rows or files of substantially parallel inclined collector sheets 3 are provided, adjacent rows being inclined in opposite directions and in such a way that the vertical passages between the packing elements are substantially completely masked, so that liquid delivered from above the said collector sheets is distributed in film formation over both sides of the subadjacent packing elements without appreciable cascading and without substantially restricting the fiow of gas or vapor. In the example illustrated, the collector plates 3 are made integral with the packing elements I. but they can be made separately and when so made, the lowermost edges of the collector sheets may touch the top of the packing elements, but in any event the lowermost edges of the collector sheets must be so placed relative to the uppermost edges of the packing elements that the liquid falling from the collector sheets is directed on to the surface of the packing.

The tongues or collector sheets 3 areinclined alternately in opposite directions and the width of said collector sheets is preferably small compared to the width of the subadjacent packing elements to which they deliver liquid because this results in the liquid being distributed substantially uniformly over both sides of said packing elements.

In Figs. 1 and 2, collector sheets 3 are provided at the top of each tier of packing elements and this arrangement has certain definite advantages, but it is not necessary within the broad scope of the invention and the collectors can be eliminated from the packing elements in the tiers below the uppermost, as in Fig. 3. In Fig. 3 the packing elements I e and I are plain, the elements in the upper tier resting on or being in contact with the transversely arranged elements of the subadJacent tier, there being no interlocking of the elements in the two tiers. The collector sheets 3 of Fig. 3 are inclined altemately in opposite directions and small in widthas compared to the width of the subadJacent packing elements I, as in Figs. 1 and 2.

In Figs. 1-3 inclusive, the collector sheets are plane in cross-section or profile, ,but it is ob-- vious that these collectors may have various profiles, two examples of which are illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5, Fig. 4 showing curved or convex collector sheets 1 and Fig. 5 showing oppositely curved or concave collector sheets 3 it being understood that the lower edges of these '5 collector sheets direct liquid to the upper edges of subadjacent packing elements.

It is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the exact construction and arrangements shown and described and that va- '10 rious modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for treating gases or vaporswith liquids, comprising a packing composed of a plurality of vertical sheet elements arranged transversely in superposed tiers, and means for delivering liquid in film formation to'said elements comprising collectors consisting of two or more closely adjoining rows of parallel in-- clined sheets, adjacent rows being inclined in opposite directions and adjacent sheets in each row being inclined to such an extent that there is no vertical passage between them, the bottom edges of the collector sheets being substantially parallel to the top edges of the subadjacent packing elements so that liquid delivered from above the said collectors is distributed over both sides of the subjacent packing elements without appreciable cascading and without substantially restricting the flow of gas or vapor.

2. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, in which the width of the collector sheets is small compared with the width of the subjacent packing elements to which they deliver liquid so that the liquid is distributed substantially uniformly over both sides of the said packing elements.

'3. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, in which collector sheets are provided at the ,top of each 40

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2490080 *May 19, 1944Dec 6, 1949Francis L MelvillContacting apparatus
US2662759 *May 13, 1949Dec 15, 1953Keith Brewer AubreyMulticellular fractionation column and the like
US2695773 *Nov 2, 1949Nov 30, 1954Carrier CorpCooling tower
US2758017 *Jul 30, 1949Aug 7, 1956Babcock & Wilcox CoApparatus for oxidizing residual pulp liquor
US3006623 *Dec 29, 1958Oct 31, 1961Exxon Research Engineering CoFluid distributor for packed columns
US3039749 *Nov 13, 1957Jun 19, 1962Fluor CorpPacking for gas-liquid contacting equipment
US4094937 *Apr 15, 1976Jun 13, 1978Zurn Industries, Inc.Cylindrical multi-fan counterflow cooling tower
US4171334 *Mar 17, 1978Oct 16, 1979Balcke-Durr AktiengesellschaftApparatus for securing assembly plates in spraying installations of heat exchangers
US4276242 *Nov 19, 1979Jun 30, 1981Koch Engineering Company, Inc.Vapor-liquid contact grid apparatus
US4500330 *May 31, 1983Feb 19, 1985Evapco, Inc.Drift eliminator
US4579694 *Dec 29, 1983Apr 1, 1986Evapco, Inc.Sheets for evaporative counterflow heat exchangers
US5725810 *Oct 16, 1996Mar 10, 1998Sulzer Chemtech AgPacking for a counterflow high pressure column
US5975503 *Feb 4, 1999Nov 2, 1999Alberta Research CouncilStructured packing assembly
US6325360Oct 28, 1999Dec 4, 2001Alberta Research Council Inc.Structured packing assembly
US6991222 *Mar 31, 2003Jan 31, 2006George Amir MeskiStructured packing with increased capacity
US7025339Aug 25, 2005Apr 11, 2006Air Products And Chemicals, Inc.Structured packing with increased capacity
EP0776695A1 *Nov 29, 1995Jun 4, 1997Sulzer Chemtech AGPacking for a high-pressure counterflow column
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/112.1, 261/DIG.110
International ClassificationF28F25/08, B01J19/32
Cooperative ClassificationB01J2219/32408, B01J2219/32206, B01J2219/32227, F28F25/087, Y10S261/11, B01J19/32, B01J2219/32213
European ClassificationB01J19/32, F28F25/08E