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Publication numberUS2042900 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1936
Filing dateJun 8, 1935
Priority dateJun 8, 1935
Publication numberUS 2042900 A, US 2042900A, US-A-2042900, US2042900 A, US2042900A
InventorsFloyd M James
Original AssigneeFloyd M James
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Veinous drain tube
US 2042900 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jame 935 F. M. JAMES VEINOUS DRAIN TUBE Filed June 8, 1935 Patented June 2, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2 Claims.

This invention relates to veinous drain tubes employed by morticians for draining blood from the body preparatory to embalming. The general object of the invention is to provide means for obviating the necessity of completely removing the tube when a blood clot appears in the veins, which, under the old method necessitated the entire removal of the tube and its reinsertion into the vein.

Another object of the invention is to so form the device that in most cases the clot can be removed very easily and quickly through means of a plunger and an expanding end on the tube.

This invention also consists in certain other features of construction and in the combination and arrangement of several parts, to be hereinafter fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawing and specifically pointed out in the appended claims.

In describing the invention in detail, reference will be had to the accompanying drawing wherein like characters denote like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, and in which:

Figure l is an elevation of the invention with the prongs expanded and the parts in operative position.

Figure 2 is a longitudinal sectional view showing the parts in position ready for insertion into the veins.

Figure 3 is a section on the line 33 of Figure 2.

In this drawing the numeral l indicates the tube having the nipple 2 connected therewith adjacent its outer end for receiving a hose and the other end of the tube is provided with a plurality of longitudinally extending slits which form the prongs 3 which are so made that they normally expand as shown in Figure l. A plunger rod 4 is adapted to be inserted into the tube and has the piston 5 adjacent its inner end and a substantially semi-spherical head 6 on the inner end, the extremities of the prongs being rounded to conform to the head as shown at 1. A handle 8 is connected with the outer end of the rod or stem for operating the plunger.

A sleeve 9 has a sliding fit on the tube and the outer part of the sleeve is formed with the enlargement I0 which acts as a hand hold, and a nut I0 is threaded on the outer end of the tube to form a hand hold.

The sleeve 9 is pushed inwardly or downwardly to the position shown in Figure 2 when the device is to be inserted into a vein. As it will be seen the tube with the sleeve in this position will have its prongs contracted so that the device can be readily inserted into the vein. After the device has been inserted the sleeve is pulled back to the position shown in Figure 1 which permits these prongs to expand in the vein and the plunger is retracted to permit the blood to flow through the device. When a blood clot appears in the vein and passes between the prongs and stops the flow of blood to the tube, the plunger is pushed inwardly and then pulled out to draw the clot through the tube thus clearing it. Under the old method where the tube is not provided with the expanding prongs the clot would never have entered the tube therefore clogging the entrance to the tube and necessitating complete removal and reinsertion.

If for any reason the plunger will not remove the obstruction, the sleeve can be pushed down to the position shown in Figure 2 and then the tube and the plunger may be removed from the sleeve, leaving only the sleeve inserted in the vein. Then the rubber drain tube is attached directly to the sleeve and this will remove the most obstinate clots, though under all ordinary and usual conditions use of the plunger is sufficient.

It is thought from the foregoing description that the advantages and novel features of the invention will be readily apparent.

It is to be understood that changes may be made in the construction and in the combination and arrangement of the several parts, provided that such changes fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In an embalming instrument, an elongated 30 tube having longitudinally extending slits in one end portion thereof to provide expanding prongs, the ends of the prongs curving inwardly, and an elongated sleeve slidably arranged on the tube for contracting the prongs, the slitted portion of the tube being of the same diameter as the rest of the tube when the prongs are contracted, said sleeve being of the same internal diameter throughout, whereby the tube can be pulled from the sleeve to permit one end of the sleeve to remain in a vein.

2. In an embalming instrument, an elongated tube having longitudinally extending slits in one end portion thereof to provide expanding prongs, the ends of the prongs curving inwardly, and an elongated sleeve slidably arranged on the tube for contracting the prongs, the slitted portion of the tube being of the same diameter as the rest of the tube when the prongs are contracted, and the tube being capable of being withdrawn from the sleeve to permit one end of the sleeve to remain in a vein after withdrawal of the tube from the vein, and a plunger slidably arranged in the tube and including a stem, and a piston connected to one end of the stem and being rounded to conform to the rounded ends of the prongs, when the prongs are contracted.

FLOYD M. JAMES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4802479 *Oct 31, 1986Feb 7, 1989C. R. Bard, Inc.Hand-held instrument for implanting, dispensing, and inflating an inflatable membrane
US5411517 *Mar 31, 1993May 2, 1995Guignard; MireilleCannula for use during arthroscopic procedures
US7309334 *Jul 21, 2003Dec 18, 2007Von Hoffmann GerardIntracranial aspiration catheter
US7892203Aug 8, 2005Feb 22, 2011Onset Medical CorporationExpandable transluminal sheath
US8231600Nov 7, 2007Jul 31, 2012Onset Medical CorporationIntracranial aspiration catheter
US8348892Jan 14, 2011Jan 8, 2013Onset Medical CorporationExpandable transluminal sheath
US8425549Dec 23, 2008Apr 23, 2013Reverse Medical CorporationSystems and methods for removing obstructive matter from body lumens and treating vascular defects
US8597277Mar 11, 2011Dec 3, 2013Onset Medical CorporationExpandable transluminal sheath
US8764704Dec 11, 2012Jul 1, 2014Onset Medical CorporationExpandable transluminal sheath
US8939931Jul 16, 2012Jan 27, 2015Onset Medical CorporationIntravascular access catheter
Classifications
U.S. Classification27/24.2, 604/106
International ClassificationA61M29/00, A61M27/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M29/02, A61M27/00
European ClassificationA61M27/00, A61M29/02