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Publication numberUS2043343 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1936
Filing dateSep 29, 1933
Priority dateSep 29, 1933
Publication numberUS 2043343 A, US 2043343A, US-A-2043343, US2043343 A, US2043343A
InventorsWarner Stanley F
Original AssigneeWestern Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Card game apparatus
US 2043343 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 9, 1936.

S. F. WARNER CARD GAME APPARATUS Filed Sept. 29, 19153 Patented June 9, 1936 CARD GAME APPARATUS Stanley F. Warner, Cicero, Ill., assignor to Western Electric Company, lncorpcrated, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application September 29, 1933, Serial No. 691,475

19 Claims. (Cl. 273-151) This invention relates to card game apparatus, and more particularly to card holding apparatus.

This invention has been found particularly useful in card games, such as, for instance, duplicate bridge, wherein a plurality of decks of cards are divided into a plurality of diierent playing hands, either previous to the play, as they are played, or thereafter, the individual hands being separately segregated, identied and kept intact so that they may be played over again, either by the same partners or their opponents, or in any desired order.

The primary object of this invention is to provide an improved, practical and compact apparatus for holding individual groups of cards segregated, identified and intact for subsequent play.

In accordance with one embodiment of this invention, a card holding apparatus is provided which comprises a molded tray-like body which denes an interior space therein having four partially independent intercommunicating compartments for four groups of cards arranged so that two groups are retained at one level and two groups at a different level overlappingly in contact with and at angles to the first two groups. A plate bearing identifying indicia is assembled on the body above the groups of cards and firmly retains each group in its respective compartment, While still permitting each group to be easily inserted in or taken out of its compartment without interfering With the other groups. A rack is provided for holding a set of holders in stacked relation comprising a molded base having two vertical standards xed thereto which lit in diagonally opposite corner recesses in the card holders and a removable and lockable cross bar, also serving as a handle, interconnects the upper ends of the standards to lock the holders together as a set and prevent unauthorized inspection of the cards, the top holder being placed upside down.

A more complete understanding of the invention may be secured from the following specification considered in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a card holding apparatus embodying the invention, in which a group of cards is shown in one of each of the different level compartments, one compartment of one level being empty of cards and one compartment of the other level having its group of cards partially removed;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical section taken on the line 2--2 of Fig. 1 with a group of cards in each compartment of the holder; and

' Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the rack for holding a set of card holders. y

Referring now to the drawing, and particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, a card holder or tray is indicated in general by the numeral lli comprising a onepiece molded body member I I made of bakelite or other suitable molding material. The body member II is square and provided with two parallel lower rectangular card holding compartments I2 and I3 separated by a reinforcing rib I4 rising from a bottom surface I 1 and forming inner side walls I8 of the compartments. End Walls I9 of the compartments disposed at right angles to the inner side walls I3 also rise from the bottom surface I1 to a common height with the inner walls, except at their outer ends where they rise to the greatest depth of the body member I I, while outer side walls 20 parallel to the inner side walls are slightly higher than the latter walls to provide stop surfaces for each group of cards indicated at 2I and 22 to prevent them from sliding accidentally out of the compartments.

suitably secured by cement or otherwise in a round hole formed in the rib I4 intermediate its length is a reduced round end' of a square shank 26 integrally formed on a square molded bakelite plate 21, the square shank having opposite walls thereof flush with the inner walls I8 of the compartments I2 and I3. The lower surface of the plate 21 is spaced from the upper surface of the rib I4 by the shank 26, a distance substantially the same as the height of the inner side walls I8 and the end walls I9 of the compartments. Preferably this space should be only slightly greater than the thickness of a group of cards.

Above the two lower compartments I2 and I3 are two parallel upper rectangular card holding compartments 28 and 29 separated by the shank 26 of the plate 21, and arranged at right angles to the lower compartments, each having a bottom T-shaped surface 32 formed from the upper surface of the rib I4 at each side of the shank 26 of the plate 21 and a right angle extension of the upper surfaces of the end walls I9 of the lower compartments, the extensions and the upper surface of the rib being in a common plane. Inner side walls 33 of the upper compartments are provided by opposite sides of the shank 26 of the plate 21 between the upper surface of the rib I4 and the lower surface of the plate 21, while outer side walls 34, parallel to the inner side walls 33 ofthe upper compartments rise from the bottom surface 32 to a height which is subtantially in the plane of the upper surface of the plate 21.

The plate 21, which extends from the center of the body member I I, partially covers the four compartments and is effective in cooperation With the end and outer side walls of theV compartments to prevent the cards from falling out of the several compartments, in any position of the holder, when each compartment contains its group of cards. Like the outer side Walls 20 of the lower compartments, the outer side walls 34 of the upper compartments are suiiiciently high to provide stop surfaces for the upper cards of each group, only one of which is illustrated, indicated at 35, to prevent them from sliding accidentally out of the compartments. End walls 39 of the upper compartments rise from thebottom surface 32 and terminate in the planevof the outer side walls 34, the end walls I9-of the lower compartments at this point being of a common height with the end Walls of the upper compartments. The junction of the end walls I9 and 39 of the lower and upper compartments, Arespectively, which rise to a common height and which is the greatest depth vof the body member II, providesa reinforced portion 49 at each corner of thebody member.

To facilitatethe removal of each of the groups of cards from'their respective compartments, the outer side walls '20 and 34 and the bottom walls I1 and32 ofthe compartmentsare formed With semi-circular vi'lnger notches 4I. Each corner portion'40 of the body member I I is formed with an arc-shaped recess or notch 42 for a purpose to `be described hereinafter.

For simplicity and accuracy of description the four compartments'have been referred to so vfar as if they were independent entities. Reference to the drawing shows vat once vthat the interior space dened by the inner surface of the tray andthe cooperating surfaces of the central shank and plate, actually presents the four compartments as intercommunicating without any complete partitions between except as to an outer longitudinal half or less of each compartment defined between the several pairs ,of consecutive corner Vmembers 49. .Compartments for groups 2l and '22 do vnot vcommunicatedirectly but do so by way of both 'the other compartments. When in use, each compartment is further partially defined and walled bythecards in vthe two compartments above orbelow. Thus .the groups of cards coact with ,theholder to retaineach other in place.

The upper surface of the center plate 21 has inscribed thereon `adjacent each of `its four outer edges one of the letters N, E, S and W, designating north, east, South and west players, an arrow pointing to the letter N, and such other indicia may be inscribed thereon as vmay be found desirable to facilitate the use of the apparatus in playing different types of card games. For eX- ample, induplicate contractbridge certain plates will indicate that one or both pairs of players are Vulnerable. To indicate the position of the dealer, the Word Dealer is -inscribed upon one or the other ofthe `bottomsurfaces I1 or 32 of the lower and upper compartments, respectively, of the body member II, and in such position that it will 'be hid when .the group of cards is in the compartment. In making .up a set of four card holders Ill, the center plates 21 and the -body members II Will .be assembled so that one of the letters N, E, .S and W .on the lplates will appear opposite the word Dealer of theassociated body member I I .in each completed holder I0. In playing, for instance, duplicate `contract .bridge the various fcombinationsof Dealer and Vulnerable require generally a total yof sixteen card `having xed thereto in opposite diagonal corners two vertical standards 46 which, when the cardholders I0 are stacked upon the base 45 as shown in Fig. 3, fit into one, or the other, pair of -the diagonally opposite arc-shaped notches 42 Vformed in the corners of the card holders.

To protect the cards in the top holder I0 of the stack it is turned upside down. The upper end of each of the standards 46 is formed with a peripheral annular channel 41 disposed a short distance belowtheupper end thereof, which is in the form of a rounded head, indicated at 48. A cross bar 49, which'also serves as a handle for the rack 44, connects the standards 46 at their upper ends, the bar beingformed with suitably shaped slots at each end (not shown) for receiving the upper ends ofthe standards 46 and thereafter upon a slight longitudinal movement ofthe bar the latter maybe latched under the lower annular surface of the heads 48. its latched position to the standards by a lock 5G which is operatively associated with lone of the slots in the bar.

Due to the particular arrangement of the card holding compartments, as described above, a very compact and efficient card holder or tray is provided and one which is .pleasing in appearance. Also it will be obvious that any group or 'hand of cards may be readily inserted in or vremoved fromany compartment at either level regardless of Whether the other compartments contain cards or are empty, and with a minimum of injury to `thecards dueto the ready accessibility and ropenness of the compartments. Furthermore, the center plate 21 above the compartments, which partially coversthe compartments, is effective in cooperation with the end and outer side Walls of the compartments to prevent the cards from falling out of the several compartments, in any position of the holder, when each compartment contains its group of cards. The center plate also provides a convenient surface for inscribing identifying indicia useful in playing card games to Which the holders IU are applicable. Due to the .fact that the center plate can assume any one of four positions, the word Dealer can be Vmolded `into the base, all of the bases being thus identical. Also the notching of thecorners of `the holder .in cooperation with the standards 4'6 ofthe rack 44 provides vmeans whereby the holders may be stacked in a set on the rack and locked thereto to prevent unauthorized inspection of the hands of `cards carried in the holder compartments.

It Will be 'understood that the embodiment herein described is merely illustrative of the inventionand one application thereof, .the invention being limited .only by the scope of the appended claims,

What is claimed is:

1. .A Vholder for a plurality of groups 'of cards having a set of card compartments atone common level,.and a setaof card compartments at another common level, the compartments at one level being .arranged to overlap and communicate with The bar 49 is locked in 3` the compartments at the other level whereby groups of cards arranged in the holder coact with the holder to retain each other in place.

2. A holder for a plurality of groups of cards having a set of card compartments at one common level, and a set of 'card compartments at another common level, the compartments at one level being arranged to overlap and communicate with the compartments at the other level, the compartments' of each set being substantially parallel to each other ,and not parallel to the compartments of the other set, allwhereby groups of cards arranged in the holder coact with the holder to retain each other in place.

3. A holder for a plurality of groups of cards having a set of card compartments at one common level, and a set of card compartments at another common level, the compartments at one level being arranged to overlap transversely and communicate with the compartments at the other level whereby groups of cards arranged in the holder coact with the holder to retain each other in place.

4. A holder for four groups of cards having two opposite card Ycompartments at one common level, and two opposite card compartments at another common level, the compartments at one level being arranged to overlap and communicate with the compartments at the other level whereby groups of cards arranged in the holder coact with the holder to retain each other in place.

5. A holder for four groups of cards having two mutually parallel card compartments at a common lower level, and two other mutually parallel card compartments overlapping and communicating with the first two compartments, the two sets of compartments having their lengths extending in directions substantially at right angles to each other.

6. A holder for a plurality of groups of cards having a set of card compartments open at the top at a common lower level, a set of card compartments at a common upper level open at the top and arranged to overlap and communicate with the compartments at the lower level, and a plate fixed to the holder for partially covering the compartments, whereby groups of cards arranged in the compartments coact with the holder and with the plate to retain each other in place.

7. A holder for four groups of cards having two mutually parallel card compartments open at the top at a common lower level, two mutually parallel card compartments open at the top at a common upper level arranged to overlap and communicate with the compartments at the lower level, and a plate xed to the holder and extending from the center thereof for partially covering the compartments, the two sets of compartments having their lengths extending in directions substantially at right angles to each other, all Whereby groups of cards arranged in the holder coact with the holder and with the plate to retain each other in place.

il. A holder for a plurality of groups of cards comprising a unitary body member having a set of mutually parallel card compartments at a common lower level and a set of mutually parallel card compartments arranged to overlap and communicate with the first set of compartments, and 4a plate carried by said body member for partially covering the compartments, the two sets of compartments having their lengths extending in directions substantially at right angles to each other, all whereby groups of cards arranged in the holder coact with the holder and with the plate to retain'each other in place.

9. A holder for four groups of cards comprising a unitary body member having two mutually parallel cardV compartments open at the top at one common level and two mutually parallel card compartments open at the top at a different common level arranged to overlap and communicate with the rst two compartments, and a plate bearing identifying indicia cemented to said body member and extending from the center thereof for partially covering the compartments, the two sets of compartments having their lengths extending in directions substantially at right angles to each other, all whereby groups of cards arranged in the holder coact with the holder and with the plate to retain each other in place.

l0. A holder for four groups of cards comprising a body member having two card compartments at one level, and two card compartments at another level, the compartments at one levelV ar. ranged to overlap the compartments at the other level, said body member formed with a separating wall for the compartments of one level, and

with end and outer side walls for each of said compartments at the different levels effective to prevent the cards in the several compartments from sliding either endwise or transversely out of said compartments, and a plate having a portion xed to the upper surface of said separating wall i for spacing the plate therefrom, s aid plate portion forming a separating wall for the compartments at the higher level, said plate partially covering each of said lower and upper level compartments and effective with said end and outer side compartment walls to prevent the cards from falling out of the several compartments in any position of the holder when each compartment contains a group of cards.

11. A holder for four groups of cards comprising a body member having a pair of card compartments at a lower level, a wall separating said compartments, end and outer side walls for said compartments, a pair of card compartments at an upper level overlapping transversely said lower compartments, the bottoms of said upper compartments being formed by the upper surfaces of said separating and end walls for said lower compartments, end and outer side walls for said upper compartments, said latter end walls exi tending inwardly at each corner of the body member from said latter side walls to the inner surfaces of said end walls for said lower compartments, the upper surfaces of the end walls of said lower and upper compartments at the corners of the body member being in a common plane, a plate spaced from the upper surface of said separating wall for said lower compartments for partially covering each of said lower and upper compartments, and means between said plate and sepa.

rating wall for separating said upper compartments and securing said plate to said body member.

12. A holder for cards comprising a member having card holding compartments, said member having notches at diagonally opposite corners thereof for cooperation with a carrier for the holder.

13. A holder for cards comprising a member having card holding compartments, said member being formed with arc-shaped notches extending across the depth of the holder at diagonally opposite corners thereof for cooperation with a mounting device for the holder.

14. A holder for cards comprising a member having card holding'compartments, saidv member having ;notches .at diagonally opposite corners thereof ,fthe holderbeing designed to be assembled instacked relation with other holders,.the notches ofthe stacked holders being alined'for cooperation with a mounting and securing device for the stacked holders.

l5. A holder for cards comprising a square shaped .member having card holding compartments, said member having a notch in each of the vfour cornersthereof whereby either pair of diagonally opposite notches may be used in coopera.- tion with a mounting device for the holder.

16. A holder for a plurality of groups of cards having aplurality of card compartments open at the top in a common plane, a plurality of card compartments open at the top in another common plane, the compartments in one plane being arranged to overlap and communicate with the compartments in the other plane, and means carried by the holder for partially covering the compartments whereby groups of cards arranged in the holder coactwith the holder and the means to retain each other in place.

17. A holder for a plurality of groups of cards comprising a bodymember having a plurality oi cardcompartments open at the top in a common plane, a plurality of card compartments open at the top inanother common plane, the compartments .in one plane being arranged to overlapfandcommunicate with the compartments in the .otheriplana said bodyxmemberl being .formed with #separating Walls for i the .compartments in the different planes, .and'withendand outerlsidt .walls for each of said-.compartments in the different planes eiective .to prevent the cards in the severalcompartments from sliding either endwise or=transversely out of vsaid compartments.

18. A holder forfour hands of cards having a pair of ycompartments open at the top at one level accessible respectively from opposite sides of the holder, and asecond pair of compartments open at the top at ahigher level and overlapping and communicating -With said first compartments, said second pairof compartments being accessible respectively from the opposite sides at right angles to said rst sides.

19. A'holder for four hands of .cards having a pair of compartments open at the top at one level accessible respectively from opposite sides of the holder, and a second .pair ofv compartments open at the top at a higher-level and overlapping and communicating 'with said rst compartments, said second pair of compartments being accessible respectively from'the opposite sides atright an gies to said rst sides, said holder comprising as its main element an integral body forming the floors of said compartments, apartition between the lowermost compartments and outside retaining walls for the four compartments.

STANLEY F. WARNER.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/151
International ClassificationA63F1/00, A63F1/10
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/10
European ClassificationA63F1/10