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Publication numberUS2043829 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1936
Filing dateDec 16, 1931
Priority dateDec 16, 1931
Publication numberUS 2043829 A, US 2043829A, US-A-2043829, US2043829 A, US2043829A
InventorsGrant Donald R, Hambrecht Edward J
Original AssigneeBeech Nut Packing Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package and method of producing the same
US 2043829 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 9, 1936. D. R. GRANT ET AL PACKAGE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME Filed Dec. 16, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet l h 106 S 5 R b Y o E Ta N N R EBH 0 m1 w I a r a n o D Filed Dec.- 16, 1931 PAC .2 Sheets-Sheet 2 o o N NT 5 l5 /5 Donald l A G r a n 13 Edward J Hambrechi ATTORNEYS Patented June 9, 1936 PATEN FFICE PACKAGE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME Donald 8.. Grant, Canaioharle, and Edward J. Hambrecht, Palatine Bridge, N. Y., assignors to Beech-Nut Packing Company, Oanajoharie,

N. Y., a corporation of New York Application December 16, 1931, Serial No. 581,316

ISCIaims.

One method at present employed in the wrapping of hard or cooked candies in stacks or rolls,

has been to first wrap the roll with a waxed paper wrapper which is wound around the peripheral 15 surface of the roll, and its ends tucked in over the ends of the roll. After the roll has thus-been completely wrapped with the waxed paper, a sheet of foil is similarly wrapped about the waxed paper wrapper and its ends tucked in over the 10 tucked in ends thereof. Suitable degrees of heat and pressure are then applied over the entire cylindrical surface and tucked ends of the foil wrapper so as to cause the wax of the paper wrapper to melt and when allowed to cool, tightly 16 seal the longitudinal seam and the end tucks of the paper wrapper and to cause the paper and foil wrappers to adhere firmly together substantially throughout their contacting surfaces.

With this method as heretofore commercially M employed, it has been' found that as the waxed paper wrapper contacts directly with the candies,

whenthe wax is melted as above described and allowed to cool to seal the package, wax is likely to adhere to the candy, especially to the edges 8- thereof which of course, is objectionable.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a method of wrapping articles, such as hard or cooked candies, which overcomes the disadvantage of the method heretofore employed 80 as above described.

Another of the objects of the invention is to provide a novel and improved package, and method of producing the same.

The several features of the invention, whereby the above-mentioned and other objects may be attained, will be readily understood from the following description and accompanying drawings, in which:

' Figure 1 is a view in perspective of a-waxed 40 paper wrapper and an unwaxed paper wrapper which may be-employed in our improved package;

Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the two wrap-' pers partially wrapped about the peripheral surface of a stack or roll of hard or cooked candies; 45 Fig. 3 is a similar view showing the wrappers completely wound about the peripheral surface of the roll of candies; Fig. 4 is a similar View showing the two paper wrappers as thus applied tucked in over the ends 50 of the roll; J Fig. 5 is a view in perspective of the completed p ka 7 Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 2 but showing the wrapp rs partly applied in a different form of 56 package;

Fig. 7 is a view in perspective of the completed package of the form shown in Fig. 6;

Fig.- 8 is a rear view of a portion of a wrappin machine which may be employed in carrying out our improved method;

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken on the line 9-9 of Fig. 8; and i Fig. 10 is a diagrammatical view showing the arrangement of certain wrapping devices of the machine near the start of the operation of wrap- 10 ping a roll of candies.

In wrapping a stack or roll of articles 2, such as hard candies that are in the form of circular disks, in accordance with our improved method,

a sheet of waxed paper 4 and a sheet of unwaxed paper 6, which preferably is glassine paper, are positioned one upon the other with one. end of the glassine paper projecting slightly beyond the corresponding end of the waxed paper. The

glassine wrapper is of slightly greater width than the length of the roll of articles, and the waxed paper wrapper is of greater width than the glassine paper. The two wrappers are then wrapped slightly more than two complete turns around the roll so that their edges overlap slightly as shown, the glassine wrapper being on the inside and its longitudinal edges projecting slightly beyond the ends of the roll. The projecting ends of the two wrappers are then tucked in over the 'endsof the roll, this operation crimping over the slightly projecting ends of the glassine wrapper, the projecting ends of the waxed paper wrapper preferably being tucked in by radially extending tucks. when the roll has thus been completely wrapped with the two wrappers, a sheet 8 of foil is then first wrapped about the peripheral surface of the paper wrappers and then its ends are tucked in over the tucked in ends of the waxed paper wrapper. The foil wrapper instead of being wrapped twice around the article as is pref- 4 erably the case with the paper wrappers as above described, is wrapped approximately one and one quarter turns around the roll, and the overlapping portions thereof are arranged so as to overlie the outer longitudinal edges of the paper wrappers.

After the roll has been thus wrapped with both the paper and foil wrappers, a suitabledegree of heat is applied, preferably to the entire area of the peripheral surface and tucked in ends of the foil wrapper to melt the wax of the paper wrapper.

The package is then subjected to a rolling and pressing action, and theends of the package are subieeted'to pressure. Such operations arepreferably continued until the wax has become thcroughly cool or set. Such rolling and pressing 55 action is preferably of such a nature as to tend to cause the wrappers to more or less tightly engage or grip the roll, and to insure that the overlapping peripheral portions of the paper wrappers are thoroughly sealed and the foil wrapper sealed or afllxed to the waxed paper wrapper throughout the peripheral area thereof. The pressing operation applied to the ends of the package is preferably such as .0 insure that the tucked in ends of both the waxed paper wrapper and the foil are tightly secured or ironed flat against the ends of the roll, which insures that the successively overlapping tucks of the paper wrapper are securely and tightly sealed together and that the end tucks'of the foil wrapper are securely sealed to the end tucks of the waxed paper wrapper.

By wrapping the roll of candies in accordance with our improved method, it will be apparent that the peripheral surface and edges of the candies are thoroughly protected from the melted wax during the heat-sealing operation. The inner end of the glassine wrapper insures against the wax working over the inner edge of the waxed paper wrapper into contact with the candies. Also, the projecting longitudinal edges or convolutions of the glassine wrapper insures against the melted wax coming into contact with the outer edges of the outermost end candies.

If desired, at the completion of the heat-sealing operation, the usual label I may be secured about the package.

In the form of package illustrated in Figs. 6

and 7 instead of the hardcandies being arranged in stacks or rolls, a series of three single candies 2' are arranged in edge to edge relation in a row. In wrapping the articles as thus arranged, the glassine paper 6 and the waxed paper 4 are together wrapped about the row of articles with the glassine innermost, with its inner end projecting slightly beyond the inner end of the waxed paper and its longitudinal edges projecting slightly beyond the outer edges of the articles, as shown in Fig. 6. When the two wrappers have been completely wrapped two or more times about the row of articles, the projecting ends of the waxed paper wrapper may be suitably folded over the ends of the article. The package may be sealed by the application of heat to the waxed paper wrapper. When the package has thus been heat-sealed, a label I0 may be placed around the package.

In this form of package also it will be apparent that the articles are thoroughly protected from the melted wax during the heat sealing. I

The machine illustrated in Figs. 8, 9 and 10 is of the type of the one described and claimed in the patent to Harry E. Townsend, Wrapping machin No. 1,813,974, dated July 14, 1931. 'As shown, this machine is provided with lower and upper wrapping rolls l2 and I4, respectively, arranged horizontally in the same vertical plane for receiving the article to be wrapped between them, and is further provided with retaining rolls It for engaging opposite sides of the article so as to retain the article between the wrapping rolls during the wrapping operation. The wrapping rolls serve to wind the wrapper about the article, the ends of the wrapper projecting beyond the ends -of the article. Tucking members l8 are arranged adjacent the ends of the lower roll for tucking in the projecting ends of the wrapper over the ends of the article after the wrapper has been wound about the article.

The wrapping material from which the wrappers are formed is fed downwardly by means of feed rolls'20, between cutting of! knives 22. A,

suitable article conveying device 20 conveys the articles to the wrapping rolls. As eacharticle is conveyed to the wrapping rolls, it engages the portion of the wrapper that projects below the knives 22 and carries the same therewith to a position between the rolls. The knives then cut off a length of the wrapping material and the wrapping rolls and associated parts operate to wrap the wrapper about the article, the wrapping material during this time being fed downwardly by the rolls 20 to present a length thereof to the next article to be wrapped. At the completion or the wrapping of each article with paper, the wrapped article may be delivered to similar wrapping mechanism for placing a foil wrapper thereon.

Except for the wrapper feed rolls 20, the parts of the machine above described may be and preferably are of the construction of the corresponding parts of the machine of said Patent No. 9

1,813,974, to which reference may be had for a full and complete description of the same.

strips 24 and 26 of wrapping material are fed between the feed rolls and between the knives 22, the former being of waxed paper and the other of glassine. These two strips are separately drawn from supply rolls 28 mounted on stud shafts 29 on the machine frame. Each of the supply rolls 28 is frictionally held from overrunning by a platelike arm 3|, the lower end of whichis pivoted on a rod 32 and its upper end is pressed against the periphery of the roll by a coiled spring 34.

The feed roll 20 that engages the glassine strip 26 is slightly larger in diameter than the other feed roll, the two rolls being driven at the same speed. With this construction the glassine strip 26 is fed downwardly slightly faster than the waxed paper 24 so that when the lower end portions of the two strips are positioned across the path of the article to be wrapped, the end of the as illustrated in Figs. 1 to '4 of the drawings, the

wrapping devices then wrapping the article in the glassine and waxed paper wrappers as above described.

As will be evident to those skilled in the art,

our invention permits various modifications without departing from the spirit thereof or the scope of the appended claims.

What we claim is:

1. The method of wrapping an article which comprises applying a wrapper of waxed paper and a wrapper of unwaxed paper about the article with the unwaxed paper on the inside and with its 1 inner end projecting beyond the inner end, of the waxed paper wrapper, positioning the wrappers in said predetermined. relation previously to ap-' plying them to the article, applying a wrapper of foil over the paper wrapper, and applying heat to the foil to cause the wax of the waxed paper wrapper to secure the wrappers'about the article.

2. The method of wrapping an article which comprises applying a wrapper of waxed paper and a wrapper of unwaxed paper about the article with the unwaxed paper onthe inside and with its inner end projecting beyond the inner end of the waxed paper wrapper, positioning the wrappers insaid predetermined relation previously to applying them to the article. and applying heat to the waxed paper wrapper to cause the wax thereof to secure the wrappers about the article.

3. The method of wrapping an article of cylindrical form which comprises wrapping about the peripheral surface of the article a wrapper of unwaxed paper and a wrapper of waxed paper with the unwaxed paper on the inside and with its inner end projecting beyond the inner end of the waxed paper, the ,ends of the unwaxed paper' projecting a slight distance beyond the ends of the article and the ends of the waxed paper projecting a distance beyond the ends of the unwaxed paper, tucking in the ends of .the wrappers over the ends of the article so as to completely enclose the article, similarly wrapping a sheet of foil over the paper wrappers so as to completely enclose them, and applying suitable degrees of heat and pressure to the foil wrapper to cause the wax of the waxed paper wrapper to secure the wrappers about the article.

4. The method of wrapping an article which comprises wrapping about the peripheral surface of the'article a wrapper of unwaxed paper and a wrapper of waxed paper with the unwaxed paper on the inside and with its inner end projecting beyond the inner end of the waxed paper, the ends of the unwaxed paper projecting a slight distance beyond the ends of the article and the ends of the waxed paper projecting a distance beyond the ends of the unwaxed paper, folding the ends of the wrappers over the ends of the article so as to completely enclose the article, and melting the wax of the waxedpaper wrapper to secure the wrappers about the article.

5. The method of wrapping an article of cylindrical form which comprises feeding a strip of waxed paper and a strip of unwaxed paper of narrower width longitudinally, the unwaxed paper being fed at a slightly faster rate of speed than the waxed paper, positioning the advancing end portions of the two strips together with the unwaxed strip arranged centrally of the waxed strip, cutting off forward end lengths of the two strips to form superposed wrappers with the advancing end ofthe unwaxed paper wrapper projecting slightly beyond the corresponding end of the waxed paper wrapper, winding the two wrappers about the peripheral. surface of the article with the unwaxed paper wrapper on the inside and its ends projecting slightly beyond the ends of the article, tucking in the ends of the wrapper over the ends of the article, applying a foil wrapper over the paper wrappers, and tucking the ends thereof over the tucked in ends of the paper wrapper, and applying heat to the surface of the foil wrapper to cause the wax of the waxed paper wrapper to secure the wrappers about the article.

6. The combination of an article of cylindrical form, a wrapper of waxed paper and a wrapper of unwaxed paper wrapped -about the peripheral surface of the article with the unwaxed paper on theinside and its ends projecting slightly beyond the ends of the article, its inner end projecting slightly beyond the inner end of the waxed paper wrapper, and the ends of the two wrappers tucked over the ends of the article, and a wrapper of foil similarly wrapped about the paper wrappers as thus applied with the wax of the waxed paper v wrapper securing the wrappers about the article.

wrapped about the peripheral surface of the 8. In a package comprising an article having 10 an inner wrapper of waxed paper and an outer wrapper of foil with the wax of the paper wrapper securing the wrappers about the article, the improvement which comprises a wrapper of unwaxed paper inside of the waxed paper wrapper 15 with its inner end projecting a distance beyond the inner end of the waxed paper wrapper.

9. In a package comprising an article having a waxed paper wrapper with the wax thereof securing the wrapper about the article, the im- 20 provement which comprises a wrapper of unwaxed paper inside of the waxed paper wrapper with its inner end projecting a distance beyond the inner end of the waxed paper wrapper.

10. In a package comprising an article of cylindrical form, and a wrapper of waxed paper wrapped about the peripheral surface of the article with its ends tucked in over the ends of the article, and with the wax thereof securing said tucked in ends in position, the improvement 30 which comprises a lining of unwaxed sheet material wrapped about the peripheral surface of the article and arranged between said surface and the outer wrapper with the ends of said lining bent over the end edges of the article and 35 held in position by said tucked in ends of the outer wrapper;

11. In a package comprising an article of cylindrical form, and a wrapper of waxed paper article with its ends tucked in over the ends of the article, and with the wax thereof securing said tucked in ends in position, the improvement which-comprises a lining of unwaxed sheet material wrapped about the peripheral surface of the article and arranged between said surface and the outer wrapper with the ends of said lining bent over the end edges of the article and held in position by said tucked in ends of the outer wrapper, and with the inner edge of said 50 lining projecting beyond the inner edge of the waxed paper wrapper.

12. The method of wrapping an article of cylindrical form which comprises winding'a wrapper of waxed paper and a wrapper of unwaxed paper 55 about the peripheral surface of the article with the unwaxed paper on the inside and its longitudinal edges projecting slightly beyond the ends of the article and-with the longitudinal edges of the waxed paper projecting beyond the ends of 60 the article a distance of at least the length of the radius of said ends, tucking in said longitudinal edge portions of the waxed paper wrapper over the ends of the article, and applying heat and pressure to the tucked in portions of the waxed 55' paper wrapper to cause the wax thereof to secure said portions in position.

13. The method according to claim 10 which includes the additional step of positioning the inner unwaxed paper wrapper with its inner end 7 projecting beyond the inner end of the waxed paper wrapper.

DONALD R. GRANT. EDWARD J. HAIMIBRECH'I'.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2624989 *Aug 3, 1949Jan 13, 1953Hankins Container CompanyMethod of packaging elongated articles
US2655776 *Feb 28, 1950Oct 20, 1953C G B CompanyProcess for heat sealing
US2678820 *Oct 30, 1951May 18, 1954Rca CorpReeling system
US2776608 *Mar 31, 1952Jan 8, 1957Gen Mills IncMethod of making a multi-layered container
US3034780 *Feb 3, 1960May 15, 1962Faustel IncMachine and method for sheeting and interfolding material
US3112665 *Mar 8, 1960Dec 3, 1963Otto Hansel Junior G M B HMethod and apparatus for wrapping candy or the like
US4282904 *Dec 6, 1979Aug 11, 1981Hoechst AktiengesellschaftArticle of manufacture comprising a hollow rod of longitudinally gathered tubing with a support sheath surrounding the hollow rod, process for producing same, and use of the article in producing sausages
US5557882 *May 11, 1995Sep 24, 1996Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant package having a waxy wrapper
US5584162 *May 11, 1995Dec 17, 1996Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral product
US5595802 *Mar 3, 1994Jan 21, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Self adhering wrapping material for wrapping flower pots and method of using same
US5636493 *Jun 6, 1995Jun 10, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method and apparatus for wrapping a floral grouping with multiple sheet wrapper
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US5661950 *May 11, 1995Sep 2, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US5740655 *May 28, 1997Apr 21, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US5782057 *Apr 21, 1997Jul 21, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method and apparatus for wrapping a floral grouping with multiple sheet wrapper
US5816021 *Apr 22, 1997Oct 6, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method and apparatus for wrapping a floral grouping with multiple sheet wrapper
US5842323 *May 7, 1997Dec 1, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US5873465 *Jan 27, 1997Feb 23, 1999Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant package wrapped with a waxy material
US5878547 *Dec 11, 1996Mar 9, 1999Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral product with a shredded material
US6052968 *Mar 10, 1998Apr 25, 2000Southpac Trust Int'l, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US6070390 *Nov 30, 1998Jun 6, 2000Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US6345468Jan 24, 2001Feb 12, 2002Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant package having a waxy wrapper
US6357204Apr 24, 2000Mar 19, 2002Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US6591582Feb 12, 2002Jul 15, 2003Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US8763351 *Jun 19, 2008Jul 1, 2014Greene, Tweed Technologies, Inc.Method of packaging for thin fragile parts
US20090011172 *Jun 19, 2008Jan 8, 2009Greene, Tweed Of Deleware, Inc.Method of packaging for thin fragile parts
WO1989001906A1 *Sep 1, 1988Mar 9, 1989Plastiroll OyPackaging sheet for wrapping round material wound into a roll and the method of wrapping the packaging sheet
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/446, 53/389.4, 226/109, 53/212, 53/463, 53/449, 53/479
International ClassificationB65B11/58
Cooperative ClassificationB65B11/58
European ClassificationB65B11/58