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Publication numberUS2044649 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 16, 1936
Filing dateJan 21, 1933
Priority dateJan 21, 1933
Publication numberUS 2044649 A, US 2044649A, US-A-2044649, US2044649 A, US2044649A
InventorsSwennes Benjamin A, Trott Rolland S
Original AssigneeTrott
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Engine mounting
US 2044649 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

\ June 16, 1936. B. A. swENNEs ET Al. l 2,044,649

ENGINE MOUNTING Filed Jan. 21, 195s l 4 sheets-Sheet 1 @i maw 09@ June 16, 19.36. B.'A. s'wENNEs E'r AL 2,044,649l

` ENGINE MOUNTING Filed Jan. 21, 1933 4 sheets-shut 2' June 16, 1936--` B'. A. SWENNES ET ALV I 2,044,649

ENGINEL MOUNTING Filed Jan. 21, 1935 4 sheets-sheet s @7715 I lne/@WSW Z5 @im 6lmwmY/ww June `1.6, 1936. B. A. swENNEs ETAL ENGINE MOUNTING Filed Jan. 2l, 1953 4Sheets-She-et 4 A will, '1111 M f Il flfatented June tsm-:e A s1-miesl PA'ri-:NroI-FICE 2,044,649 ENGINE Momma Benjamin A. Swenncs, Rockford, Ill., and Rolland S. Trott, Denver, Colo.; said Swennes assilnorA Application' January 2l, 1 933, No. 652,894

Q rsomma (ci. 24a-1) i0 tremor or vibration to the frame `or support upon which the power plant is mounted.

A further object is to provide a` mounting unit composed ofl a coiled spring whi'cliat all times will be under compression, combined with a rubl ber member which normally after being installed is under compressionbut whichA on a rebound or with over-capacity lspringsor before the unit isl installed will be in tension,`

il furtherobject-is' to provide a method orsonoI struction' by. wh ic h thesame'compound mounting unitvwhieh will takeboth load Kand'torfiiie and which may be used to mount both` the iront and rear portionsoi the `power plant, and may also if desired be employed as a torque connection orconnections whose main dutyit is to transmit torque whetherlaportionioi the'welght oi. the power plant is cris not Supported.

Anefthis is described below and in the. drawings, in which:-

FiguresLl to show diiierent steps in .the icon-'I struction and installation of one iorm'oi our mounting -unit, ,which unit will hereinaterbo called a TremoRid,--a name coined for which gets ridoitremor..`

Figure .'1` illustrates a plan yview of mountedupon TremoRids at -a plurality of points, all oi which, or-any .two or. more'otwhioh maybe employed, as wiIlbe-niore fully taken up herein atten-ff w Flgure a partial front view-oi the plant-showndn Figure 7. f y i 1 Figure 9 is-.a .partial section on the linef-b oi Figure "7; looking in` the direction .of the arrows. Figure 101is a modified form ofthe construction illustrated in Figure 1,.

Figure 11 isa partial section onfthe line 4Ii i 1i of Figure "7, lookingv in the directionr of the arrows and showing anv additional -rfubber mounting Figure 12 is a. modiiiedform 'oithe construe? uonsliown in Figure "11; t

Figure 13 is a partial section on the line ld-SB of Figure?, looking inthe direction 'of the arrows.

Figure 14 is a secti0na1'-vview oan installed mem.

unit

Tremoltid showing a 'modified means of holding the end plates in place.

Figure 15 is a fragmentary plan view of one of the end plates shown in Figure 14..

Figure 16 shows another form oi 'IremoRid 5 construction.` i x Figure 17 is e. fragmentary view oi another form of TremoRid construction.

Figure- 18 showsanother form oi. TremoRid construction provided with safety rebound hooks. l0 Flgurelil shows another iorm of TremoRid construction." 7 Figure 20 shows another form oi TremoRid construction providedwith a .cable as safety rebound Figure 21 shows another form oi TremoRid construction.-

Figure `22 is a top view looking down on Figure 2l.

Figure 23 shows another form of 'rrememd een- 2o struction `provided with a safety rebound means. Figurev 24 `.shows another iorm of TremoRid construction provided with another form of safe- -ty rebound means.

'Figure ,25 shows anothe construction provided .with-another forni oi safety rebound means.

Figures A26 and 27 show modied forms of cups. Figure 28 shows a modiflediorm of adapting the "TremoRid unitM to a powerplani'. mounting. 30'

In Figures'l to`6 the cups i are provided with the bolts 2, which may be spot-welded or otherwise. 'pr`evuted from turning with respectto the 'oups as by the rubberbonding mentioned below j or in any other proper manner. The bolts 2 are 35 provided with the shoulders 3` and the threaded.

Figure i shows the assembled bolts and' cups in their future relative positions.

The rubber member E is next vulcanized, bonded, cemented or otherwise properly attached to 40 :torni2 a unit` with the two cups, asshownv in Figure Next, the bottomplate E is assembled with .the

. ylower cup i'and bolt 2 by riveting the shoulder 3 of the bolt 2 in'the beveled Acoui'rter bore iof 5 the end plete s. 'This is shown in Figure 3.v The uppenbolt shown in Figure 3 isaI modied form having the ange @which is provided with two flat places Q which will be more fully explained o hereim'iiter.`v y In Figure 4 it will be seen that the spring it,

whichis here shown unloaded, fits snugly over the cups i and rubber member ii andvrests upon the lower end-plate o. 55

forced downward, compressing the spring Il so that the shoulder 3 of the upper bolt 2 may beriveted into the bevel counter bore 1 in the upper plate 6. Figure 5 therefore shows the com- -p1eted TremoRid ready for installation. The rubber 5 is in tension since it alone is now resisting the extension of the spring I0 which is in compression.

Figure 6 shows the completed TremoRid of Figure 5 when it is installed between the part II of the power plant and part I2 of the frame with the nuts I3 and lock washers I4 properly in place. When thus installed, the weight of the engine rests upon the TremoRid and as we prefer it the rate of deilection and construction of the spring III is so proportioned to the load as lto put normally about thirty-pounds to the square inch upon the rubber member 5. It will be seen, however, that if the spring II) is too strong or too long the rubber member 5 will carry a reversed load; that is, it will be in tension. Ordinarily, we do not prefer this construction as it means, other things being equal, the spring will not be as soft in action, and where smoothness of performance is desired we have found that the softer the spring action is, the better; provided the load on the rubber does not come to much more than thirty pounds to the square inch. However,

where a TremoRid is used for a torque connection, a reversed load on the rubber in some cases is permissible depending upon conditions includthe frame I6 by TremoRids carried by the cross members I1, I8, I9, 29 and 2|. Ordinarily a power plant will be mounted upon the cross member I'I and the cross member 2l, for instance, but

A the supports on the cross members I8, I9 and 20 may be used in place of or in addition to the support upon the cross member 2l. The use'of all the supports shown in Figure 'l would probably occur only under very special sets of conditions or for very special designs', weights, powers and distributions of weight in a -power plant. For ordinarymotor vehicle construction we prefer to support the power plant upon the cross `member I1, substantially as shown, and upon the cross member 2l, which, with the cross member I0 and the cross member 2|, is shown broken away for the sake of clearness and to avoid confusion in the drawing. The exact longitudinal position of the cross member Il is to be determined tor any power plant by supporting the power plant as vshown at the front upon a scale and moving the pacity and construction. However, due to vari` ous considerations it may be found `impossible to locate the rear mounting at the point of equal weight with the front mounting and under such conditions identical weight quantities tor each TremoRid can be arrived at by variation of the angular positioning oi' the TremoRids. Ordinarily by this method four TremoRids, which will be interchangeable. will be suillcient to mount the entire power plant both front and 5 rear. Under this plan, if it is necessary for weight or other considerations to use more than four TremoRids,I additional TremoRids may be empoyed by using three or more at the front and three or more at the rear mounting, instead of using additional cross members and TremoRids as shown in Figure 7.

' Figure 8 shows a fragmentary front view of the construction shown in Figure 7 with the axes of the TremoRids intersecting at the desired position for the front end of the axis of oscillation of the power plant. This point of intersection may of course be changed by changing the verticalposition of the TremoRids, or by changing the angle of their axes or by both changing the 20 vertical position and the angle of their axes. The particular position ofthe intersection of the axes shown in Figure 8 is in the vertical plane through the axis of the crank shaft but this of coursewillv vary with the requirements for balance in 25 any particular power plant.

Figure 9 shows the mounting of the TremoRids on theA cross member I8` and in contact with the flywheel housing 22 with the TremoRid axes intersecting at the axis of oscillation of the power plant which in this instance is illustrated as being only slightly above the axis of the crank. shaft. This point oi.' intersection may be changed by variation of the same factors mentionedre'- garding the construction shown in Figure 8. 'I'he 'h construction shown in Figure 9 may either be proportioned so that the TremoRids carry someof the weight or proportioned so that the Tremo- Rids are normally unloaded and lonly act to oppose-the torque cushioning oscillation ofthe power plant.

The construction shown in Figure l0 is a variation oi.' that shown in Figure 9 in which the axes of the TremoRids are vertical. In this construction also the TremoRids may either carry some of the weight or act solely to resiliently oppose the torque cushioning oscillation lof the power plant. In the construction shown in Figure 9 and Figure 10 the TremoRid mounting may, if desired, be so designed as to put a negative load upon the TremoRids: that is, tension in the rubber member l will tend to pull down upon the power plant.

Figure l-l shows the construction for mount ing the rear of the power plant upon the cross member 20. The mounting the rear oi.' the power plant upon the cross member I0 is substantially the same as shown inFigure ll. The axes of the TremoRids intersect at the axis oi oscillation of the power plant in both cases and the TremoRids contact the transmission 23. Ordinarily the TremoRids on both the cross member I. -and the cross member 2l will support weight, but if for any reason it is necessary or advisable, they may of course carry negative 6" loads. Between the transmission 23 and the cross member 2l a resilient means may be provided to 'absorb the fore and ai't movement of the power plant. 'I'he bracket 10 is bolted or otherwise properly attachedto the transmission 23; the bracket 'II is bolted. riveted or otherwise properly fastened to the cross member 20, and these two brackets serve to,l position the rubber cushion block 'I2 by means of flanges as snowman mund the block, or dmerent positions may be provided by anges on two sides of the block, ilanges through the center ofthe block or by bonding the rubber block to members 10 and 1l or by any other proper means by which the power plant will be resiliently held 'against longitudinal movement.

It will be seen from the above description and from lFigure 11 that the means for locating the power plant with respect to its fore and att positions may be applied to Figures 9, 10, 12, 13, or used in connection with the front mounting on-cross member I1 of Figures 7 and 8 or in any other application of this TremoRid type construction wh'erebyfull 'advantage may be taken of the required universal movement of the TremoRid without the power plant being permitted to move longitudinally.

Figure 12 shows a variation of the construction shown in Figure '11, in which the axes o! the TremoRids are vertical, and in which the TremoRids may or may not carry a load or may even have a negative load.`

Figure 13 shows a construction for support ing the rear ofthe power plant upon the cross member 2l, the TremoRids contacting vthe freewheeling housing 24. A variation oi' this Figure 13 construction would be substantially the same as the-construction shown in Figure 12. That is, the TremoRids in Figure 13 may, if desired, be positioned withtheir axes vertical and may be put under either a positive, a neutral or a negative load.

It will be understood from. all the above that though vthese variations in numbers and ylocations of mountings and TremoRids are permissible to meet special conditions or to conform to the taste or judgment oi designers, the construction for the front is substantially as shown in Figure B regardless of whether Tremo- Rids are or are not used for the rear mounting.

And if TremoRids are used for the rear mounting we consider it desirable that the rear mounting be so located 'longitudinally or the Tremo- Rids of the rear'mounting so positioned in their angularity that all TremoRids carry the same axial load and whatever the rearV mounting `variations may be the same size and vcapacity of TremoRids may be used all around, and rear constructions substantially like that shown in rear TremoRidson thecross member i9 where the weight sustained will be greater thanv that sustainedby the iront mounting. In any case we prefer that the rear mounting be so located whether on the cross member i9, 20 or 2| that -the results and perfomance desired for the rear mounting will b e provided whenthe same size and capacity oi' TremoRid is at the rear.

mounting as at the front.

In'- the construction shown in- Figure 14 thel bolt 2' is provided with the .iiange having the iiat spots 9 to permit the angeto pass through the ilat-sided hole 25 of the end-plate 8'. which is shown also in Figure 15. A' Ii' desired, the bolts 2 in Figure 5fmay. also' have dat places .to tit atsidedholes in the end plates! .to prevent the end .plate from twisting with respect to lthe bolts.

and this irregular shaped bolt may be riveted the same as the round bolts shown in Figure 5. In fact, the enlarged portion oi the bolts 2 which provide the shoulders 3 may be hexagonal or any other desired shape to t a similarly shaped hole in the end plates and'prevent turning oi.' the bolts in the end plates. while the riveting prevents separation of the cups I and the end plates 6. After the angeA 8 has passed through the plate 6' in the Figure 14 construction, the plate 6' is turned so that the fiat spots 9 oi' the ilange 8 no longer align4 with the at sides of.

the hole 25, and the end plate B' is thereby locked in place.

ber member 5 if desired.-

Figure 16 shows an inverted TremoRid coristruction in which the rubber member 26 sur- By this construction the TremoRid may be disassembled for replacement o! the rubrounds the spring 21. The cups 26 and 29 are v properly bonded to the rubber 26, and the bolt f 30 is riveted in a beveled counter sink 3i of the cup 29.' The cup 32 is also bonded to the rubber member 26 and when the TremoRld is assembled the spring 21 is placed in the cup 28 and Figure 17 shows a modified form ofthe construction shown in Figure 16 in which the cups 28 and 29 are bonded to the rubber member 26' and the bolt 34 is welded or otherwise proper l ly secured to the cup 29.

Figure 18' shows a construction similarto Figure 5 except for 'theaddition of theL safety hooks 36 which are integral with the bolts 131. In case, for any reason the bonding of the rubber member38 with'the cups 39 atany time fails, the safety hooks 36 will prevent therspring I il from completely disassembling the TremoRid.

Figure 19 shows a modification oi' the'Figure 17 construction. infwhich the bolt 40'is.welded. riveted or otherwise properly securedto the cup -Q 4| and the rubber member 42 is properly bondedto the cups 4| and 43 whilethe bolt 44 is properly welded or otherwise secured in the end plate 45; 'I'he spring 46 is properly compressedagainst the cup 4i, 'and the end plate'145 is put in. place.

andfriveted there by the rivets 41, or attached thereto in anyother proper manner.

While the constructions shown in Figures 16,

in tension before the TremoRid is installed to carry load, and under the action of torque all of this is substantially the same as the TremoRid construction shown in Figure 5, still the rubber members in Figures 16, 17, -19 and 24 do not cushion the shocks on bad road bumps in the same way as the rubber member 5 inthe. Figure 5 construction, for in the TremoRid shown in the Figure l5 construction the rubber, in fact, per'- i'orms a triple function. `It acts in compression,

f in7tension and in torque the same as the rubber members 'in the Figures 16, 17, 19 and 24 construc` tions, but in addition to this ,the rubberfmember `1'1, 19 and 24 all act to put the rubber members in the Figure 5 construction, since it is a closev rit inthe spring I0, provides an additional and positive though resilient stop which is'not providedin the construction shownin Figures 16, 17, 19 and 24. y

Rubber, when confined, .is non compressible It is deformabla'but must be able to dow in order to yield: Normally, for the slight amount of cush-` ioning required, the rubber 'member 6 in the Figure -vconstruction may iiow out to some e compressing movement will be stopped smoothly and resiliently by the increased resistance of the rubber member 5.

The construction shown in Figure 20 is similar to that shown in Figure 5, except that a cable 50 or other exible means is pinned, welded, soldered. or otherwise properly attached to the bolts I5, which are in turn welded or otherwise properly fastened to the end cups. 'I'he cable connection 50, which is normally inactive, servesv to limit the extension of the springor extreme tension which might be put upon the rubber for any reason whatsoever, whether it be excessive rebound after installation or in the handling of the TremoRid unit before installation.

Figure 21 shows another method of construction whereby the unit can be easily assembled. The process of assembly is similar to that shown in Figure 1-4 and previously explained. In Figure 21 it will be seen that the upper plate 53 has been placed upon' the spring iii and forced downward, compressing the spring i0 so that the tongues 54 of cup 52 which at this point project straight upward. pass through the slots provided in the end plate 53, whereupon the tongues 54 are bent into the position as shown in Figures 21 and 22 and serve to contain the TremoRid as a unit. The bottom portion shown in Figure 21 is identical to the construction 'shown in Figure 5. However, this may be varied and both end portions may be made identical to the top as shown in Figure 2l.

Figure 22 is a top view of Figure 2l and serves to show more clearly the position and the manner in which the tongues 54 are spaced about the plate 52.

Figure 23 shows a construction which in operation and eii'ect is similar to Figure 5, except for the inclusion of a normally inactive safety rebound means. In this construction the bolt 55 is free to move in the cup 55 but which in case the bondings of the rubber member fail has a head 55' upon it whereby it will seat in the cup 5B and prevent the spring l0 from completely disassemblingthe TremoRid. Under the action of further compressive forces, the rubber member 5' combined with the spring i0 will stop the movement before the head of the bolt 55 is permitted to come into contact with the head o! the rivet 51. The cup 55 is attached to the plate 5' by the rivets 35 or in any other proper manner.

Figure 24 shows a construction which in operation and eiiect is similar to Figure 16 except for the addition of a normally inactive safety rebound means, in case the bonding of the rubber member should fail. It willl be seen that the cup 50 fits snugly over the spring 21. The top cup 50 is free to move in the bottom cup 6I and in case the bonding fails and the spring 21 attempts to disassemble the TremoRid, the outwardly projecting ilange 6I will seat itself against the inwardly projecting ange 63 and positively limit the extension of the spring and serve to retain the TremoRid as a unit.

The construction shown in Figure 25, while similar in eect to that shown in Figure 5, is

p manner.

tempt to extend beyond normal limits, the flange 58 Will come into contact with the flange 61 and prevent further extension. Further the combined action of the rubber member 69 and the spring I0 will stop the'movement before the upper cup flange 68 is permitted to come into contact with the lower cup 66 as a result of compressive forces. It will be noted from Figure 25 that the rubber member 69 has sumcient clearance between its outside diameter and the inside diameter of the cup 65 to permit the proper flow of the rubber under compression.

Figures 26 and 27 show cups 80 and 8i respectively to be used in the same manner as cup I of Figure l. However, the cross section shape has been varied. which might ail'ord several advantages such as greater strength, increased lateral resistance and an increased bonding area. Numerous other variations of cross sections are possible either with or without perforations therein. In all of these TremoRid constructions more or less lateral or torque resistance can be obtained by increasing or decreasing the depth of the wall section of the cups or any other proper variation that will vary the resistance of the TremoRid to lateral displacement between its two end plates. In fact, the cups may be so modified as to have no side walls whatever, in which case they would appear as flat discs, or discs with circular, radial or other indentations or proper corrugations as the case may be.

In Figure 28 will be seen a method of construction whereby a portion of the power plant weight is sustained by the centrally located TremoRid 11. The movement of the power plant about the center of oscillation'is maintained by the two rubber blocks 15. 'I'he rubber blocks 16 also resiliently limit longitudinal vmovement of the power plant through their positioning by means of the flanges 18 of the bracket 14 and the flanges 19 of the brackets 15 and the bonding of the rubber blocks to the above brackets, or to one bracket only. The flanges 18 and 19 may be of any proper construction, as shown, or imbedded centrally in the rubber blocks, or any other proper means may be employed wherein theubracket 14 is resiliently maintained longitudinally with rcspect to the brackets 15.

The above-mentioned method of mounting, While shown as being on a cross member 13,

, may be employed at any or all locations en the power plant as in Figure 7; that is, it may be used in conjunction with any one or all of the constructions shown on the cross members I1. i8, i9, 20 and/or 2l, or lin any other proper 'Ihe construction shown in Figure 28 shows two rubbers and one TremoRid, while the construction shown in Figure 1l shows one rubber and two TremoRids. Naturally, to suit any particular condition or requirement, any desired number of TremoRids may -be used in conjunction with any desired number of rubbers to form a single mounting.

We have employed the word TremoRid".

tive proportions of the various dimensions in any apague i This is of our own coining and has beenadopted as a name for the unit which is adapted to be interposed between some rigid support or foundation, such as the frame of an automobile, for example, and theobject supported thereon, as for example, the power plant ofan automobile.- its fundamental purpose being to sustain, absorb, and dissipate the tremor or shocks incident to the activating impulses of the power plant while resiliently' resisting lateral displacement between its two ends. Clearances, dimensions vand relaor allof, these constructions are to be such as to provide the kind and amplitudeof movement required for any and all cases.

Having now described ourvinvention, ywhat we claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is as Iollowsz- I 'Y 1. A weight supporting mounting vfor an engine unit having atendency to oscillatory movement during operation about' a longitudinal axis, comcompression spring 'between said end members members, a rubber member between the cups and and compressed during assembly so as to be in a preloaded condition. f l

3. A mounting unit adapted to support a load and comprising a compression spring compressed during assembly so as to be in a preloaded condition and a rubber member limiting the extension of the compression spring, and means carried byv the mounting unit to attach it to the load and to the support therefor.

4. A mountingunit comprising two oppositely faced'cups having loppositely extending threaded attached to the cups, end plates secured to the cups and acompression spring compressedbetween the cups during assembly so as to be in a preloaded condition when assembled tending to separate said end plates and put tension on said rubber. n' l 5. In a mounting unit to-be connected to a power plantl and a frame to provide for movement between the power plant and the frame and to resiliently oppose either transverse or longitudinal variation in the relative positions oi its two endsl and composed oi a coiled spring, a rubber member closely tting within the coiled spring. end members attached to vthe rubber -member to limit the elongation of the spring when said unit is not installed to carry load, said bers as a unit, and `means for fastening said Iunit t0 the load' to besu'pported and tothe structure thereunder.

'1. A mounting unit of the characterfdescribedcomprising two weight., supporting resilient members, one or which isnormally in', tension andv 5 the other is positively loaded whenxtheunitis not installed toearry load, one o! said'resilientl members surrounding the other, 'nand-Limeanstor and havingyopposite endsl of ftl'ie springmbearingf thereagainst, the separate end plates permitting assemblyof` the spring after attachment otjthe rubber member tothe cups.

9. Afpower plant mounting unit comprising a coiled compression spring, a non-metallic resilient member Aenclosed within the coiled spring, and end members connected with the spring and Anonmetallic resilient member, said non-metallic resilient member being constructed and arranged 25 to limit the extension of the compression spring, said spring having the coils thereoi free from the non-metallic resilient member and normally disposed relatively /close together under load to move closer together upon an increase in load 30 and thereby restrict flow oi the non-metallic resilient member causing said last-mentioned member to carry anincreased proportion of the.

load.

10. A power plant mounting unit comprising a coiled compression spring, a rubber member enclosed within the coiled spring, separate end plates respectively attached to the rubber-mem- 'ber and having the coiled spring'bearing thereagainst, said rubber member being constructed and arranged to limit the extension of the compression spring, said spring having the coils there- `of free from the rubber member and normally disposed relatively close together under ioad to move closer together upon an increase in load and thereby restrict ilow of the rubber member causing said rubber member to carry an increasing proportion of the load, and means connected with the end plates for attaching the mounting unit to a load and to a support therefor.

11.l A power plant mounting unit comprising telescoped resilient members, at least one of which is non-metallic, a plate at an end of the nonmetallic lresilient member and bonded thereto, attaching means for an end of the unit and coniningfthe other resilient member, means for securing said attaching means to the plate after bonding of the non-metallic resilient member thereto, and means at the ,opposite end of said unit for conning said resilient members.

l2. A power plant mounting comprising telescoped resilient members, at least one of which is non-metallic. plates at the opposite ends of the non-metallic resilient member and bonded thereto, attaching means for an end of the unit having means for conning the other resilient member, means for securing said attaching means to the adjacent plate after bonding of the nonmetallic resilient member thereto, and means at the' opposite end or said una for winning said 7o resilientmembers.

13. A power plant mounting comprising two telescopedresilient members,-one being non-metallic and the other being metallic, plates at the n opposite ends of the non-metallic resilient mem- 25 'ery thereof within the inner contines of the meber and bonded thereto, attaching means for an end of the unit having means other than the plates for confining the metallic resilient member. means for securing said attaching. means to the adjacent plate after bonding of the nonmetallic resilient member thereto. and means at the opposite end of said unit for conilning said resilient members. y

14. A power plant mounting comprising two telescoped resilient members, one being non-me- -tallic and the other being metallic, plates at the opposite ends of the non-metallic resilient member and bonded thereto, and attaching means tor the opposite ends of the unit having means other than the plates for confining the metallic resilient member, and means for seeming said attaching means to the adjacent plate after bonding of the non-metallic resilient member thereto.

15. A power plant mounting comprising two telescoped resilient members, one being non-metallic and the other being metallic, the metallic member surrounding the non-metallic member, a plate at an end of the non-metallic member and bonded thereto, lsaid plate having the periphtallic member. a second plate at said end of the unit extending outwardly in position to confine an end ofthe metallic resilient member, means for securing said second plate to the mst-mentioned plate after bonding of the non-metallic resilient member thereto, and means at the opposite end of said unit for conilning said resilient members.

16. A power plant mounting comprising two telescoped resilient members, one being non-metallic and the other being metallic, the metallic member surrounding the non-metallic member, cups enclosing the ends oi the non-metallic member and bonded thereto, said cups having the outer margins thereof approximately at the periphery of the non-metallic member and surrounded by the metallic member, plate members at the ends of the unit extending `outwardly beyond the cups in position to conine the ends of the metallic resilient member, and for securing 29 the plate members to the cups after bonding of the non-metallic resilient member thereto.

BEN. A. BWENNES.

ROLLAND S. TROTI. 25

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2572919 *Feb 28, 1946Oct 30, 1951Barr & Stroud LtdVibration damping mounting for optical observation instruments
US2680284 *Nov 3, 1950Jun 8, 1954Barry CorpMethod of making dampers for vibration isolators
US2680585 *Nov 3, 1950Jun 8, 1954Barry CorpVibration isolator
US2687269 *Oct 25, 1950Aug 24, 1954Robinson Aviat IncVibration absorption unit
US2744718 *Aug 29, 1952May 8, 1956Barry Controls IncVibration isolator
US2864573 *Feb 5, 1954Dec 16, 1958Gen Motors CorpEngine mounting
US2930556 *Oct 17, 1957Mar 29, 1960Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus
US3007692 *Oct 29, 1959Nov 7, 1961Gen Motors CorpMethod of molding
US3219362 *Jun 3, 1964Nov 23, 1965Fairless HillsFlexible landing gear foot
US3268199 *May 8, 1964Aug 23, 1966Union Carbide CorpShock absorbent support structure
US3625501 *Dec 15, 1969Dec 7, 1971Stringfellow Jerry DReinforced rubber shear pad
US3749340 *Oct 19, 1970Jul 31, 1973Richen IncMounting assembly for looms and the like
US4006892 *Dec 15, 1975Feb 8, 1977Lord CorporationCompression mounting
US4150857 *Jan 16, 1978Apr 24, 1979Caterpillar Tractor Co.Armored cushioning lug for track-type vehicles
US4615513 *May 3, 1984Oct 7, 1986Volvo Bm AbFlexible, force-transmitting element
US5507061 *Sep 30, 1994Apr 16, 1996Nobuyoshi KumakiRotary brush floor polisher
US5667202 *Mar 19, 1996Sep 16, 1997Lord CorporationHybrid elastomer-and-metal spring isolator
US5676356 *May 30, 1996Oct 14, 1997The Boler CompanyFlexible bolster
US7200971 *Oct 8, 2002Apr 10, 2007PlacoplatreSuspender bottom bracket for ceiling frameworks, a suspender having this kind of bottom bracket, and an assembly comprising a sealing framework and at least one such suspender
CN100427329CAug 30, 2002Oct 22, 2008沃尔沃铰链式运输机公司Flexible element
EP1429929A1 *Aug 30, 2002Jun 23, 2004Volvo Articulated Haulers ABFlexible element
Classifications
U.S. Classification267/140.4, 267/286, 267/33, 217/54, 267/292
International ClassificationF16F3/00, F16F3/10
Cooperative ClassificationF16F3/10
European ClassificationF16F3/10