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Publication numberUS2044837 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1936
Filing dateOct 7, 1935
Priority dateOct 7, 1935
Publication numberUS 2044837 A, US 2044837A, US-A-2044837, US2044837 A, US2044837A
InventorsDavis Harry D
Original AssigneeDavis Harry D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure for collapsible tubes
US 2044837 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 23, 19360 vgs 2,044,837

CLOSURE FOR COLLAPSIBLE TUBES Filed Oct. '1', 1935 INVENTOR MRRY D. P4 v/s BY v-wma ATTORNEYS Patented June 23, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CLOSURE FOR OOLLAP SIBLE TUBES Harry D. Davis, Springfield, Mass.

Application October 7, 1935, Serial No. 43,911

5 Claims. (Cl. 221-60) This invention relates to improvements in closures for receptacles and is especially useful in connection with receptacles of the collapsible tube ype.

More particularly, the invention has to do with a closure of the type which can be quickly and conveniently moved from open to closed position and vice versa, andwhich remains attached to the tube at all times, so that it cannot become lost or misplaced.

The invention has for an object to provide an improved closure means for collapsible tubes and the like, in which the closure element is held in place by elastic arms secured to a collar-like anchorage, attached to the tube in a positive, non-slip fashionthe various parts of such means preferably being made of rubber or the like and preferably in one piece.

Other objects will appear as the detailed description proceeds and will be pointed out in the appended claims.

The invention will be disclosed with reference to the accompanying drawing, in which Figs. 1 and 2 are fragmentary exterior elevational and sectional elevational views, respectively, of a collapsible tube showing one form of my improved closure means;

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. -1 except that the closure is shown displaced from the mouth of the tube;

Fig. 4 is a view taken similarly to Fig. 1 but showing another form of the invention; and

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the form of closure means shown in Fig. 4.

Referring to this drawing, the closure means of this invention comprises a closure element 6, adapted to seat against the rim 1 which encompasses the mouth 8 of the collapsible tube 9; a collar III for attachment to the neck ll of the tube; and a pair of elastic arms H, which interconnect the element 6 and collar I!) at diametrically opposite points and are fixedly connected both to the collar and the closure element.

The element 6 has on its lower face a part l3 of a size enabling it to enter the mouth of the tube as shown in Fig. 2. At the intersection parts 6 and His a shoulder l4.

The various elements of the closure means are preferably made in one piece from suitable elastic material, such as rubber for example. While it is preferred to form the device as one piece of molded rubber, it is obvious that the several parts may, if necessary or desirable, be separately formed and suitably secured together, as for example by cementing.

The closure means described may be secured to the neck II of the collapsible tube in any suitable way which will positively hold the collar portion IO against axial displacement. In the drawings two forms of securing means are shown. In Figs. 1 to 3, the collar I0 is engaged in a circumferential groove IS in the neck ll of the tube.

In Figs. 4 and 5, the collar I0 is made of greater width and is interiorly screw threaded as at IE to fit the usual screw threads ll on the exterior 10 of neck ll.

In the form shown in Figs. 1 to 3, the collar It! has sufficient elasticity to enable it to be stretched enough to be slipped over the neck I l and, when it reaches groove IE, it will contract and enter the groove and be firmly held therein. It is important that a firm anchorage -be provided for the lower ends of arms l2, which in the operation of the device are stretched and subjected to considerable tension. Hence, the collar is engaged with neck II in non-slip fashion, as distinguished frbm sole reliance on frictional engagement of the collar with the neck of the tube. This form of the invention may be used, when the closure means is applied at the factoryby the manufacturer of the tubes.

The form shown in Figs. 4 and 5 is preferred for several reasons. It may be supplied by the manufacturer of the tubes or sold separately to be applied by the purchaser in place of the usual screw-threaded closure cap. Moreover, this form of connecting means is easy for anyone to apply and it has the advantage that it enables the arms 12 to be easily adjusted to secure just the right degree of tension. The collar I0 is screwed down until the closure element 6 seats on the rim 1 and then it is screwed down an additional amount to place the arms [2 under sufficient tension to resist removal of the closure element. This tension is such that no amount of pressure, which can be applied to the tube in the manner used to expel its contents, will displace the closure element 6. The tube will burst before the element 6 can be forced fromits seat. Also, it is preferable to have the arms so strong that the closure cannot be removed by astraight upward pull. Having in mind these conditions, it will be appreciated that a firm, positive and nonslipping attachment of collars ID or ill to the tube is required.

In using the device, the closure elementis moved laterally from the position shown in Fig. 1 to that shown in Fig. 3 One holds the tube in one hand and displaces element 6" by pressing against it with the thumb. This operation is facilitated by 55 the shoulder II which engages the rim of hole 8 at one side when pressure is applied to element 6 at the opposite side. The groove formed at the intersection of elements 6 and I3 catches on the sharp edge of hole 8 and prevents slipping of the closure on the fulcrum provided by the rim 01' the hole 8, during the operation of rolling the closure out of covering relation with the hole. Then, when the element 6 has been moved into the position of Fig. 3 the same groove engages the sharp outer peripheral edge formed at the upper end of neck H and firmly holds it in its open position. It is considered important to have arms l2 fixedly connected to the closure element 6, as distinguished from the so-called bail connections of the prior art', which enable the closure element to rotate on the bail. With the use of the strong, tough, though somewhat elastic, arms l2, which enable the application of considerable tension to hold the closure 6 in place, it would be difficult to unseat the closure if the latter were free to rotate. Hence, the shoulder I4 is important in that it provides for an effective, nonslip engagement with the fulcrum during the operating of unseating the closure.

The closure means of this invention is of simple construction and capable of being manufactured in quantities at low unit cost. Cost is an important consideration in devices of this character because, in order for the device to be salable, its cost must be kept down to a point where it is not much greater than the cost of the usual screw-threaded cap. This device has this cost advantage. It also provides a very effective closure for the receptacle and one which can be easily and conveniently opened and closed and one which can be easily cleaned and kept clean because of the use of rubber and the elimination of all metal parts.

I claim:

1. The combination with a receptacle having a neck with a discharge passage therethrough, of a closure element seated on the end of said neck to close said passage, a collar-like anchorage fixed to said neck and held against axial displacement thereon, and elastic arms interconnecting said element and anchorage at diametrically opposite points and fixedly connected to both said element and anchorage; said element, anchorage and arms being made of rubber; said arms being under tension when said element is seated, said element being movable laterally out of covering relation with said passage and said arms by their fiexure and elongation enabling such movement.

2. The combination with a receptacle having an exteriorly screw-threaded neck with a discharge passage therethrough, of a closure element seated on the end of said neck to close said passage, an anchorage in the form of an interiorly screw-threaded collar threaded upon said neck and thereby adjustably fixed thereto and held against axial displacement, and elastic arms interconnecting said element and anchorage at diametrically opposite points and fixedly connected to both said element and anchorage, said arms being under tension when said element is seated; said element, anchorage and arms being made of rubber; said element being movable laterally out of covering relation with said passage and said arms by their fiexure and elongation enabling such movement.

3. The combination with a receptacle having a neck with a discharge passage therethrough, of a closure element seated on the end of said neck to close said passage, said element having fixed thereto a part which enters the outer end of said passage when the element is seated, said part and element intersecting with a shoulder and defining at the intersection a circular groove, 9. collar-like anchorage fixed to said neck and held against axial displacement thereon, and elastic arms interconnecting said element and anchorage at diametrically opposite points and fixedly connected to both said element and anchorage; said element, anchorage and arms being made of rubber; said arms being under tens on when said element is seated, said element being movable laterally out of covering relation with said passage and said arms by their fiexure and elongation enabling such movement, said groove catching on the rim of said passage when the closure element is thrust laterally to unseat it and thus holding said element against slippage on the fulcrum afforded by said rim during the unseating of the closure.

4. The combination with a receptacle having I a neck with a discharge passage therethrough, of a closure element seated on the end of said neck to close said passage, said element having fixed thereto a part which enters the outer end of said passage when the element is seated, said catching on the rim of said passage when the closure element is thrust laterally to unseat it ,1

and thus holding said element against slippage on the fulcrum afforded by said rim during the unseating of the closure, said groove catching on the outer rim of said end when said element is unseated to releasably hold it in unseated position.

5. A one-piece closure means for collapsible tubes and the like, comprising a closure element,

an interiorly screw-threaded collar for attachment to the tube, and tension arms interconnecting said element and collar at diametrically opposite points and fixedly connected both to the collar and element; said element, collar, and arms madeof one molded piece of rubber.

HARRY D. DAVIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2444995 *Aug 7, 1943Jul 13, 1948Clayton LaingPivoted closure for collapsible tubes
US2492917 *Feb 18, 1946Dec 27, 1949Weatherhead CoValve
US2895654 *Nov 23, 1956Jul 21, 1959Rieke Metal Products CorpBail handled closure cap
US3369720 *May 16, 1966Feb 20, 1968Wesley Newby ArthurClosure cap having resilient retaining means
US3874571 *Aug 2, 1973Apr 1, 1975Lever Brothers LtdContainers and closures therefor having wipe clean structure
US4087028 *Dec 16, 1976May 2, 1978Lang Frank JSnap lock dispensing cap
US4458818 *Oct 27, 1982Jul 10, 1984Gerhard HansenReclosable plastic container
US5195561 *Nov 8, 1991Mar 23, 1993Wilson Scott ATethered cover device for a pneumatic tire valve
US5417247 *Feb 22, 1994May 23, 1995Akebono Brake Industry Co., Ltd.Bleed screw cap for hydraulic equipment
US5431292 *Mar 31, 1994Jul 11, 1995General Mills, Inc.Flexible bottle having an improved, integral closure
US5944206 *Jun 10, 1997Aug 31, 1999General Mills, Inc.For holding a product to be consumed by a person
US8672157 *Mar 18, 2008Mar 18, 2014Lameplast S.P.A.Procedure for manufacturing bottles containing fluids, particularly cosmetic, medical, pharmaceutical products or the like, and relative system and bottles
US20100032401 *Mar 18, 2008Feb 11, 2010Antonio FontanaProcedure for manufacturing bottles containing fluids, particularly cosmetic, medical, pharmaceutical products or the like, and relative system and bottles
US20110042342 *Aug 19, 2009Feb 24, 20113849953 Canada Inc.Reusable container closure
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/315, 138/89.3, 222/558, 222/511
International ClassificationB65D45/04, B65D35/24, B65D45/00, B65D35/42
Cooperative ClassificationB65D45/04, B65D35/42
European ClassificationB65D35/42, B65D45/04