Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2046191 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1936
Filing dateJan 8, 1932
Priority dateJan 8, 1932
Publication numberUS 2046191 A, US 2046191A, US-A-2046191, US2046191 A, US2046191A
InventorsSmith Arthur R
Original AssigneeGordon Armstrong A, Malcolm D Macqueen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Grip for golf clubs and method of applying the same
US 2046191 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. R. SMITH 2,046,191

GRIP FOR GOLF CLUBS AND METHOD OF APPLYING THE SAME June 30, 1936.

Filed Jan. 8, 1932 Sheets-Sheet 1 Arthur 5W 1! A TTORNEYS A. R. SMITH 2,046,191

GRIP FOR GOLF CLUBS AND METHOD OF APPLYING THE SAME June 30, 1936.

Filed Jan. 8, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. A lwr RSmHzh ATTORNEYS Patented June 30, 1936 UNITED STATES GRIP FOR GOLF CLUBS AND METHOD OF APPLYING 'rnn sum:

Arthur R. Smith, Detroit, Mich, assignor of onethird to A. Gordon Armstrong and one-third to Malcolm D. MacQueen, both of Detroit, Mich.

Application January 8, 1932, Serial No. 585,425

8 Claims.

This invention relates to agrip for golf clubs andfmethod of applying the same, and has to do particularly with a grip designed to positively position the hands relative to each other and to the club grip so as to bring about a correct team play .between the hands, wrists and arms, relative to each other and to the body.

Many attempts have heretofore been made to design golf club grips with the general idea in mind of insuring positive correct position of some portions of the hands or fingers relative tothe golf club. One type of golf club grip has embodied the idea-of-forming depressions for the fingers and thumbs in the wall of the grip, such as shown in the patents to McCullough No. 1,664,257 and Ballou No. 1,556,473, and other attempts have embodied the idea of adding one or more extensions to the grip to form locating members for parts of the hand or bands such as shown by the patents to Morley No. 1,075,054 and Stoefller No. 1,694,992.

It is my belief that these prior art attempts are based on the wrong theory, the theory of the first general type being wrong because the finger depressions would make for a tendency to grip the shaft at the ends of the fingers instead of the entire hand, and the other general theory being wrong because of a decided awkwardness of the extension members, the difiiculty of attachment, and the lack of balance between the hands.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a molded grip for insuring a positive but natural position of the hands upon the club, said molded grip being so fabricated as to permit its quick and easy assembly on the end of the club hands by a novel method. More specifically, the present invention embodies a golf club grip, the actual gripping surfaces of which are approximately the same as would be encountered in a standard grip but provided with molded extensions, all-of which cooperate to naturally insure the positioning of each hand relative to the grip and relative to each other. Still more specifically, means is provided for separating the second and third fingers of the left hand from the forefinger and little finger in such a manner that the mind is completely freed from any sensing of the nerves in the'fin'gers of the left hand, with the direct result that the tension is relieved and a much better grip is obtained with the left hand. Means is also provided for obtaining an even balancing of the thumbs of each hand, one thumb being balanced against the other 'to obtain correct control of the club, the form of suchbalancing means being such that additional material leverage is obtained, particularly for the left hand and left thumb. Other means in the combination are provided for positively locating the two index fingers without the necessity of any depressions and also at the same time positively locating the second and third fingers of the right hand.

While preferably molded in one piece, my novel handle may be adjusted or distorted as to certain parts thereof to accommodate different type of grips and in assembling the complete grip, which is preferably by means of compressed air, the desired adjustment or distortion may be obtained before final setting. Other features of the grip and the method of applying, will be more clearly brought out in the specification and claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is an elevation showing my molded grip secured to the shaft of a club.

Fig. 2 is aside view of the grip shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 1 and illustrating in detail a projection'for receiving the phalange of the right thumb and for positioning the right forefinger.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 1, illustrating the portion for receiving the entire left thumb and also illustrating this posi- Fig. 1 and illustrating the preferred positioning of the rear trigger member.

Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken on line 'l'! of Fig. l and showing the relative positions of the various projecting members of the molded grip.

Fig. 8 is a view partially in section of a step in the method preparatory to assemblingthe grip on the shaft.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary detail view of a modified manner of connecting the grip with a source of compressed air.

Fig. 10 is a view of the grip attached to the shaft of a club and illustrating the hands in more or less open position before finally closing in around the grip.

Fig. 11 is a view similar to Fig. 10 but showing the correct relative position of the hands and the manner of holding the left thumb fiat against the grip with the right thumb.

While the illustrated embodiment of the present invention is in the form of a hollow molded rubber grip adapted to be applied to the shaft of the club, it will be understood that the present invention is not limited in scope to such hollow rubber grip but is designed to cover any type of grip and of any material which in general simu lates the surface dimensions and arrangement of the grip shown in the drawings.

The hollow grip, as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 may be generally designated 2 and starting at the upper end of this. grip it is provided with an extension 3 which I preferably call the rear pressure trigger because it is designed to receive pressure from the inner surface of the little finger, as is best illestrated in Figs. 10 and 11. Looking from the front end of this grip 2, and as best shown in Fig. 6, the rear pressuretrigge'r is preferably curved to the left of a vertical central plane through the grip and the shaft.

A front trigger member 4 is spaced far enough from the rear trigger member 3 as to nicely receive the two middle fingers and also to serve as" a pressure trigger for the inside surface of the forefinger of the left hand, as illustrated in Fig. 10. Inasmuch as the first and second fingers of the hand are controlled by one nerve and the third and fourth fingers controlled by another nerve, it will be seen'that by separating the two middle fingers from the two end fingm that the 'mind of the player is completely taken off the nerves of the fingers of the left hand. The direct result of this is a relief of tension or tightness providing a much better grip and also leaving the fingers free to firmly grip a substantially cylindrical surface much the same as a standard golf club grip.

i so

A raised portion 5 is preferably provided adjacent the rear pressure trigger resulting in a. positive lowering of the shaft of theclub so that the player does not have to constantly keep in mind the lowering of the end of the shaft.

The positioning member 6 for the left thumb has a portion thereof which is preferably depressed below the normal circumference of the club. This ieft thumb positioning member or depression is of such length and is so depressed as to receive the entire left thumb, one edge of this portion 6 being shaped as at I to receive and balance the left thumb against the right thumb as will be hereinafter described. The other end of this depression 6 is provided with a horn 8 which forms a positive seat for receiving the V between the left thumb and forefinger. It be obvious that this horn and the depression for I fitting against the entire length of the left thumb provide a maximum amountof pressure for the left .thumb and incidentally the left hand. A fiat surface 9 extending between the triggers 3 and I and the horn 8 on the left side of the grip, as best shown in Figs. 2 and 5, fits nicely against the palm' of the left hand, to give a tight grip without exercise of undue pressure by the muscles of the left hand.-

The combination of the two pressure triggers,

the long depression 6 for the left thumb, the horn 8 and the flat surface 9 all cooperate and tend to give the player a positive natural grip with the left hand and positively eliminates any play or twisting of the club during the stroke.=

The grip is loose in one sense of the word, in that the muscles of the hand are in no way tensioned,

thumb to press against and keep the entire left thihnb fiat in its depression 6, the left thumb in of the left hand ispositively positioned by the g trigger member 4, it will be seen that the relative longitudinal positions of the trigger member 4 and the extension I0 are such that there is only room for two fingers between the positiveiy po- 10 sitioned forefingers, as best shown in Fig. 11. This gives the correct position of the hands, with the little finger of the right hand overlapping theforefinger of the left hand.

The opposed thumb'members G and i0 prefer- 1 ably have a median angle of about 30 from the. horizontal when the club handle is in correct pox sition. This positions the right and left hand thumbs so that the opposed pressure of the thumbs is substantially balanced.

While it will be obvious that the grip unit may be severed in one or more places in applying the same to the shaft, I preferably retain the hollow molded grip member as a single .unit in applying the same to the shaft. In the preferred manner 25 of assembly, an air valve is formed or inserted in one end of the hollow grip and the other end of the grip placed orer the end H of the shaft, as best shown in Fig. 8. Introduction of air through the valve will so expand the grip that it may be 30 easily slipped over the end of the shaft and positioned correctly and circumferentially with regards to the club head. The desired amount of rubber cement may be inserted in one end of the grip prior to assembly. After the grip has been telescoped over the end of the shaft to the desired position, and while the cement still piastic, the grip may be so adjusted as to correct- 1:; position the positioning means 3, l and 6 for the left hand; this accomplished, the operator may then circumferentially twist or distort the portion of the grip below the member 6 so that thetfllxillgmb figlaiiszrintg member I 0 can be adjusted crc eren o suit the the individual. p icular grip of After assembly of-the grip over the en shaft, the end of the grip may be cut of; Z: :2: point indicated by the dotted lines in Fig. 6 or 11' desired, the end of the hoilow grip may be closed in as at I 2, see Fig. 9, and a valve unit I I used having a. tapered end portion ll. Such tapered end portion may be easily pushed through theend ii of the rubber grip and when compressed air is admitted through the valve, the tapered portion 55 I will prevent. the valve from being blown out during assembly of the grip on the shaft. It will 4 be obvious that the valve l3 may be readily removed leaving a very small, if any, opening at the endof the grip. The assembly of plain rubber grips has heretofore been quite a problem in the industry, but bymerely inserting valve means at one end of the hollow grip the grip may be easily and quickly moved into position.

The thickness of the rubber sleeve or grip and thepositioning of the various extensions thereon may vary considerably according to the type and size of hand of the player, but it will be seen that every extended or distorted portion of the grip beyond the true cylindrical surface of the grip has a definite cooperative function with every other extension or distorted part. The front surface of the front trigger I positions and serves as a pressure surface for the forefinger of the left 7 hand and combined with the thumb projection lo definitely positions the first three fingers of the right hand. The rear surface of the trigger 3 serves as a pressure surface for the little finger; the raised portion 5 cooperates with the pressure triggers and with the left thumb member 6 to positively lower the shaft in the address position. The horn 8, in combination with the trigger finger 4, assists in locating the forefinger of the left hand; the left thumb depression member 6, in combination with the horn, the flat portion 9, and the trigger fingers, all cooperate in positively locating the left hand, and the thumb locating and receiving members 6 and I0 balance the applied pressure, greatly increase the pressure of the left hand and prevent twisting of the club. Furthermore, the combined extensions and distortions make for a natural lock grip which arrangement makes possible only a very small mainder of the grip and to permit of easy assem- The bore of my hollow grip bly by air pressure. is such as to provide a snug fit around the shaft, regardless of whether said shaft is straight or tapered and by using my method of assembly under fluid pressure, it is possible to fabricate grips having a bore of less diameter than the corresponding diameter of the shaft.

What I claim is:

1. The steps in the method of assembling grips made of expansible material on to the ends of playing -club shafts which consist in forming a grip with a substantially closed end and-an open end, fitting the open end around the end of the shaft, inserting a valve stem into said closed end, gradually expanding the internal walls of the grip immediately ahead of and by means other than the shaft and introduced through the valve to permit relative movement between the grip andthe shaft, removing said stem and allowing said closed end to contract and substantially conceal the end of the shaft.

2. The steps in the method of assembling grips made of expansible material on to the ends 'of playing club shafts which consist in forming a grip with a substantially closed end and an open end, fitting the open end around the end of the shaft, inserting a valve stem into said closed end, gradually expanding the internal walls of the grip immediately ahead of and by means other than the shaft and introduced through the valve to permit relative movement between the grip and the shaft, maintaining a snug fit between the open end of the grip and the shaft during the complete assembly, removing said stem and allowing said closed end to contract and substantially conceal the end of the shaft.

3. The method of assembling hollow grips to the shafts of playing clubs, which comprises forming a flexible distendable grip with an open end and apartially closed end, fitting the open end around the end of the shaft, radially distorting a portion of the grip beyond the shaft while maintaining a tight fit around the shaft whereby to permit easy relative movement between the shaft and the grip until said shaft strikes the partially closed end of the grip.

4. The method of assembling hollow flexible grips to the shafts of playing clubs, which comprises forming the grip with an open end and a closed end except for a relatively small opening, forcing one end of the grip over the end of the shaft, inserting a small valve stem through said opening, filling the remaining portion of the hollow grip with a fluid under pressure and sliding the grip over the shaft while maintaining said fluid within the grip under pressure.

5. The method of assembling hollow flexible grips to the shafts of playing clubs, which comprises forming the grip with an open end and a closed end except for a relatively small opening,

forcing one end of the grip over the end of the shaft, inserting a small valve stem through said opening, filling the remaining portion of the hollow grip with a fluid under pressure and sliding the grip over the shaft while maintainingsaid fluid within the grip under pressure, and removing the valve stem as the shaft reaches said closed end.

6. The method of assembling a hollow grip of resilient material over a playing club shaft wherein the bore of the grip is not greater than the diameter of the shaft, which comprises forming the grip with an open end and a closed end except for a relatively small opening, forcing one end of the grip over the end of the shaft, inserting a small valve stem through said opening, accumulating fluid under pressure in the hollow portion of the grip, sliding the grip down over the shaft while maintaining said accumulated fluid under pressure, and so placing cement within said grip that it will be spread between the shaft and the grip during said assembly under pressure.

7. A grip for golf club shafts and the like comprising a hollow, circumferentially distensible sleeve of resilient material, of appreciably greater length than diameter, one end of said sleeve being open and of such predetermined diameter relative to the shaft that it may be forced on to one end of the shaft and maintain a relatively tight fit as it is moved along the shaft, the other end of said sleeve being substantially closed except for an opening adapted to receive a valve stem, the introduction of fluid under pressure through the valve stem in combination with said relatively tight fit between the open end of the sleeve and the shaft causing the walls of the sleeve to be distended and permit the sleeve to be easily slipped down over the shaft.

8. A grip for golf club shafts and the like comprising a hollow, circumferentially distensible sleeve of rubber material, of appreciably greater length than diameter, one end of said sleeve being open and of such predetermined diameter relative to the shaft that it may be forced on to one end of the shaft and maintain a relatively tight fit as it is moved along the shaft, the other end of the sleeve converging inwardly to form an abutment for the end of the shaft and adapted to receive the end of a valve stem, the introduction of fluid under pressure through the valve stem in combination with said relatively tight fit between the open end of the sleeve and the shaft causing the walls of the sleeve to be distended and permit the sleeve to be easily slipped down over the shaft.

ARTHUR R. SMITH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2628100 *Aug 1, 1952Feb 10, 1953Monroe Beebe BayardGolf grip device
US2876010 *Dec 29, 1955Mar 3, 1959Hugman Robert H HCustom positioned golf club grip
US3860243 *Aug 27, 1973Jan 14, 1975Sr Anthony J PriscoPutting aid device for use on putters
US3885297 *Mar 18, 1974May 27, 1975Mpl IncMethod of assembling glass tube and thermoplastic resin finger grip and nose sleeve syringe body
US3889351 *Mar 18, 1974Jun 17, 1975Mpl IncMethod of assembling a glass tube and thermoplastic resin, finger grip and nose sleeve syringe body assembly
US4016640 *Aug 27, 1975Apr 12, 1977`Totes` IncorporatedMethod of fabricating and installing the grip of a hand-held implement
US4134198 *Jan 3, 1977Jan 16, 1979`Totes`, IncorporatedMethod of installing grip on handle
US4511147 *Aug 3, 1983Apr 16, 1985Olsen William AGolf swing training club
US4573251 *Feb 5, 1985Mar 4, 1986Pirelli General PlcApplying an elastic sleeve over an elongate body
US5005254 *Sep 12, 1989Apr 9, 1991`Totes`, IncorporatedHandle grip
US5050289 *Apr 5, 1990Sep 24, 1991`Totes`, IncorporatedHandle grip
US5143375 *Apr 16, 1991Sep 1, 1992Wilkins Judd RGolf club finger support device
US5373616 *Mar 31, 1993Dec 20, 1994Boa, Inc.Apparatus for applying hangrips to articles such as sports equipment and the like
US5398930 *Oct 5, 1993Mar 21, 1995Faye ChenGolf grip
US5839975 *Oct 15, 1997Nov 24, 1998Black Rock Golf CorporationArch reinforced golf club head
US6110054 *Oct 22, 1998Aug 29, 2000Rodarte; Michael R.Golf club grip and swing stabilizer
US20130316860 *Dec 13, 2011Nov 28, 2013David John RichardsonGrip for a cricket bat handle
WO1983003980A1 *May 14, 1982Nov 24, 1983John Edward LackeyTennis backhand supporter and helper
WO2004062736A2 *Jan 12, 2004Jul 29, 2004James Pierce BloomCounterweighted golf club
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/203, 43/23, 29/450
International ClassificationA63B53/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/14
European ClassificationA63B53/14