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Publication numberUS2047437 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 14, 1936
Filing dateJul 23, 1932
Priority dateJul 23, 1932
Publication numberUS 2047437 A, US 2047437A, US-A-2047437, US2047437 A, US2047437A
InventorsSamuel Sinkler
Original AssigneeSamuel Sinkler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vaginal syringe
US 2047437 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' s. slNKLER VAGINAL SYRINGE Filed July 23, 1932 July 14, 1936.

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Y Iufen or Patented July 14, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFicE 2,047,437 VAGINAL SYRINGE Samuel Sinkler, Chicago, lll. Application July 23, 1932, serial No. 624,280 2 claims. V(o1.128-232 This invention relates to syringes and the like, and more particularly to vaginal syringes of the bulb type.

Vaginal syringes of the bulb type heretofore `5 made usually comprise a compressible elastic bulb vof soft rubber and a hard rubber tube and nozzle. The hard rubber tube frequently causes laceraticns and injuries of the tissue when used, and accordingly, one object'of the invention is to provide a bulb syringe of this character which may be more readily manipulated, avoiding all danger of injury to the tissue.

A further object of the invention is to provide a bulb syringe of this character which is made more compact than the usual syringe and can be closed in a compact assembly which occupies very little space. A still further object of the invention is to provide a connecting means for the tube and container of the syringe, whereby when the tube is reversed and inserted in the container the connecting means will facilitate the i compact assembly of the tube and container when not in use. A still further object of the invention is to provide means for removing from the mucous membrane, viz., the vagina, any mucus accumulated therein. Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description of one embodiment of the invention, with reference to the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 shows the complete assembly, partly in section, of a vaginal syringe, ready for use, in accordance with this invention.

Fig. 2 shows a longitudinal section through the syringe assembly in compact closed condition.

Fig. 3 is a side View of the syringe assembly, and

Fig. 4 is a section on line 4 4 of Fig. 3.

Referring to the drawing, the tube l is preferably made of soft rubber and is provided on its exterior with projections which are here'shown in the form of a continuous helical rib 2. By making the tube of soft rubber, the syringe may be more easily manipulated both during insertion and withdrawal of the nozzle, with no danger of injury to the tissues. The projections or helical rib 2 also serve, by friction with the walls of the vagina, to remove all mucus that may be accumulated on the mucous membrane. Also the helical rib 2 tends to cause the liquid from the syringe to take a circuitous path during its egress from the vagina, and thereby massage the walls of the vagina. The container 3 is preferably made collapsible so as to occupy very little space when so collapsed, To that end the bulb is made of thin, flexible, sheet-like rubber. 'I'he container bulb is provided on two diametrically opposite sides with pleats or folds 'l-l to permit the same to be collapsed. When the container is provided with liquidit assumes the usual bulbous form, 5-

but contrary to the usual compressible elastic rubber bulb the new container bulb does not tend to assume its distended condition when compressed, but on the contrary, will remain in its collapsed condition. This prevents the mucus lo It will be noted that the flange 5 carried by the 20 tube I forms an annular recess 5' adapted to be engaged by the flange 3 on the container 3 and said flange 5 is in turn adap-ted to engage in a recess 6 beneath the flange 6. As the flanges 5 and 6 are made of soft rubber or similar yielding 25 material, it will be appreciated that they can be very readily sprung into and out of engagement with each other.

The flanges 5 and 6 carried by the tube and container are so formed that upon reversing the 30 tube, the latter can be inserted into the container, and the flange 5 of the container would llt into the recess 5 beneath the flange 5 resulting in a closed and very compact structure, as shown in Fig. 2. 35

By the use of a collapsible container, it is possible to utilize a container of much greater capacity than the bulb of the ordinary syringe and yet the container will, when collapsed occupy considerably less space than the ordinary 40 bulb. The collapsed container is shown more clearly in Fig. 2, where the container is shown collapsed along the folds 1 1.

If desired, the bore of the tube can be utilized to store disinfectant tablets 8 or the like which 45 would be dissolved in the syringing liquid when the syringe is used.

The disinfectant tablets as indicated in Figure 2, can be held in transparent sheet-like material such as cellophane or the like Il and the whole tube readily inserted within the hollow portion of the nozzle tube.

It will be noted that nozzle 4 is provided with narrow elongated slits Il) instead of rounded 55 openings. I found that a slit permits a larger volume of Water to impinge against the mucous membrane with less irritation to the membrane. Obviously the nozzle 4 may be made removable from or integral with the tube I I have shown the tip of the nozzle 4 split as at 9 by a transverse recess. This space 9 may receive a disinfectant tablet 8, and the tube I may then be employed for the insertion of the disinfectant tablet directly into contact at the remote portions of the' mucous membrane, as in the case of deep-seated infections. In such cases, the tablet would be gradually dissolved by the mucous discharge assisted by the liquid being expelled through the nozzle tube. Y

In addition, the liquid in the container 3 may be forced through the nozzle 4 to Wash out the mucous discharge.

The nozzle tube is preferably made of soft rubber so that the two lips of the transverse recess 9 Will through their resiliency, tend to firmly hold in place the shaped solid tablet when placed therein.

While'I have described one specific form of my invention, it will be understood that the invention is not limited to such specific embodiment, and that various changes may be made in the embodiment described without deviating from the spirit and scope of my invention.

What I claim is:

1. A vaginal syringe of the bulb type, comprising a distensible manually operable container bulb, made of thin flexible folded sheet-like material and which bulb due to its folds distends when liquid is placed therein but which on compression, remains in collapsed condition, a soft rubber nozzle tube detachably connected to said container bulb, said nozzle tube being provided with liquid emitting openings, and having a transverse recess formed at the extreme tip thereof out of the path of the liquid which is dischargeable through the tube, said transverse recess being adapted to receive a shaped solid tablet.

Y2. In a vaginal syringe of the bulb type, comprising a distensible manually operable container bulb made of thin flexible longitudinally folded sheet-like material, and which bulb due to its folds distends when liquid is placed therein, but which on compression remains in collapsed condition, a soft rubber nozzle tube detachably connected to said container bulb, said nozzle tube being provided with liquid emitting openings and having a transverse recess formed at the extreme tip thereof, out of the path of the liquid which is dischargeable through the tube, said transverse recess being adapted to receive and due to the soft rubber Walls of the recess, being adapted to hold a shaped solid tablet.

SAMUEL SINKLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2571504 *Sep 16, 1949Oct 16, 1951Pharma Craft CorpThermoplastic spray bottle
US2588135 *Jul 15, 1949Mar 4, 1952Seamless Rubber CoSyringe
US2612894 *May 3, 1948Oct 7, 1952Akins Stephen ANasal cleansing device
US3228396 *Oct 18, 1962Jan 11, 1966Potts Albert LVaginal syringe
US3454007 *Jul 15, 1966Jul 8, 1969Salis TheodoreNon-reusable vaginal cleansing apparatus
US3495706 *Jun 19, 1967Feb 17, 1970Sokolic Harry MDisposable douche
US3771523 *Aug 2, 1972Nov 13, 1973Zanca Molding CorpDisposable douche
US3838681 *Dec 29, 1972Oct 1, 1974Dalton JDevice for collection of cells from the vagina
US5013297 *Dec 12, 1988May 7, 1991Cattanach John FVaginal douche
US5171219 *Jun 8, 1990Dec 15, 1992Sumitomo Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd.Pharmaceutical preparation administrator
US5662601 *Dec 8, 1995Sep 2, 1997Snead; Patty B.Suppository applicator
US20080232896 *Jul 5, 2006Sep 25, 2008Locite (R&D) LimitedContainer for Holding and Dispensing a Curable Product
WO1988008316A1 *Apr 21, 1988Nov 3, 1988Chattan Nominees Pty LtdVaginal douche
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/60, 604/911, 604/92, 206/69, 604/212
International ClassificationA61M3/02, A61M3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M3/0279, A61M3/0262
European ClassificationA61M3/02H