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Publication numberUS2047535 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 14, 1936
Filing dateOct 7, 1932
Priority dateOct 7, 1932
Publication numberUS 2047535 A, US 2047535A, US-A-2047535, US2047535 A, US2047535A
InventorsFrederick C Wappler
Original AssigneeFrederick C Wappler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical electrodes
US 2047535 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ly 1936- R. H. WAPPLER 2,041,535

SURGICAL ELECTRODE Filed Oct. 7, 19 32 INVENTOR BY 2 ATTORNZ Patented July 14, 1936 U NIT E D S TATE S PATENT OFFICE SURGICAL ELECTRODES Wappler, deceased Application October 7, 1932, Serial,No..636,'692

13 Claims.

My present invention relates generally tosurgical electrodes, and has particular reference to the type of electrodes which areadapted to function with electric current of high frequency.

It is a general object of my invention to provide an electrode of improved construction, whereby its employment in an endoscopic tube, in association with suitable illuminating means and a telescope, is facilitated and simplified.

A more particularobiect is to provide an electrode whose visibility is enhanced, especially from the rear thereof, and more particularly Irom a point of view obliquely rearward from the operative electrode head, such as that which .is afiorded by .a surgical telescope arranged alongside of the electrode.

While I have herein illustrated and shallhereinafter describe an electrode having anoperative head designed primarily for coagulating purposes, and while my invention is primarily directed toward the improvement of the .con struction of electrodes of this character, it will be understood that certain phases ,of my invention are not necessarily restricted to coagulating electrodes.

An electrode of the general character to which my invention relates, especially where. the same is to be used for coagulating purposes, usually consists of an elongated body from the forward end of which a conductive element projects, terminating in a bulbous or enlarged head. This head is designed to be touched or contacted with those tissue portions which are to be coagulated, as, for example, in effecting hemostasis. Since such an electrode is usually employed in interior portions of the body, it is customary and desirable to associate it with a suitable illuminating means and with a telescope, preferably a telescopic instrumentof the character illustrated in Patent Number 1,680,491 and commanding a substantially forward, though slightly oblique, field of vision.

The ordinary constructions of electrodes preclude cleancut visibility of the operative head, or at least that portion or surface of it which is actually accomplishing the desired effect. My present invention provides a construction whereby the operative electrode head is rendered visible to a greater extent, especially that face which is touched to the tissue.

The conventional electrode is also usually provided with a handle and with an electric connector device at the rear end of the elongated body; and it is a further objectof my present invention to provide a construction in which the rear endof the body is .rigidified, especially adjacent to thehandle.

A particular feature of my invention lies in constructing the rear end of the elongated body in an improved manner whereby rigidity and 5 staunchness are achieved Without complicating the construction, and, in fact, by means of an arrangement of parts which simplifies manufacture-and assembly. The present construction is of a character which may be used either with electrodes of the fixed type (in which the entire elongated body is manipulated), or of the movable type, i. e., in which the elongated body is maintained stationary while the electrode is axially shifted by means of a hand-grip arranged at the rear end.

The improved visibility is achieved, briefly, by mounting the operative head upon a conductive wire which projects from the forward end of the elongated body and which is bowed laterally out v of the line of visibility of the head. In a-preferred construction, two such bowed wires are used, whereby the operative head may be said to be supported at the forward end of an O- shaped conductive element, permitting visibility of the head through the O.

I achieve the foregoing objects, and such other objects as may hereinafter appear or be pointed out, in the manner illustratively exemplified in the accompanying drawing, wherein-- Figure 1 a side view of a typical assembly of telescope, lamp, and electrode, the electrode being of the present character;

Figure 2 is a view taken from the top of Figure,

1, with the telescope omitted, showing the elec- 5 trode device-by itself, with parts broken away for the sake of clearness;

Figure 3 is a view taken substantially in the direction of Figure 1, showing an enlarged crosssection of the rear end of the electrode body; 0

Figure 4 illustrates approximately the view which is obtained by looking through a telescope of the character shown in Figure 1;

Figure '5 is a top view, and 7 Figure 6 is a side view of the forward end of an electrode of slightly modified construction;

Figure 7 is a view taken in the same direction as Figures 1 and 3, illustrating a further modification, with parts shown in section; and

Figure 8 is a View taken substantially in the direction 8--8 of Figure 3, with the handle omitted.

.My present electrode consists of an elongated body I0, preferably composedof an outer tubular member of insulating material, and an inner tu- 55 bular conductive member II. The body of the electrode is approximately eight inches long, and the exterior diameter of the outer insulating body element is of the order of one-sixteenth inch. The relative fineness of the construction, and of the sizes of the other associated parts, will ,thus be readily appreciated.

At the rear end of the body, the electrode is ,provided with a handle, an electric connector device, and a, means for rigidifying the construction, all of which features will be described more fully hereinafter.

Forwardly of the forward end of the body I0 ,is the operative head I2 which I have illustratively shown in the form of a pear-shaped, bulbous element of suitable conductive material. This head is mounted upon the forward end of a stem I3, which is in turn supported at the forward end of an O-shaped conductive element l4. This element is preferably composed of two conductive wires having their rear ends snugly positioned within the forward end of the tubular conductive .member II, the wires diverging as they project from the body of the electrode, and having their forward ends converged in the manner shown to merge with the rear end of the stem [3.

The entire conductive member I l is preferably set into a slight curvature which is convex upwardly as viewed in Figure 1, the purpose of which will be presently described. Furthermore, the stem I 3 and the head [2 are preferably projected forwardly from the conductive element M at a slightly oblique angle, as illustrated in Figure 1.

The electrode is designed to be used in conjunction with a telescopic device which may, for example, be of the character illustrated in Patent Number 1,680,491. This telescope is provided at its forward end with the attenuated illuminating lamp l6; and slightly to the rear of the lamp is the exposed face I! of the operative lens. A telescope of this character commands a forwardly oblique field of vision substantially of the character illustrated by the limits l8.

Mounted alongside of the telescope l5, and either permanently or removably attached thereto, is the guide tube or channel I9 through which the electrode body is adapted to extend in substantially snug yet slidable relationship. The forward end of the guide tube I9 terminates slightly to the rear of the lens l1, and the general curvature of the electrode body causes the forward end of the latter to project out of the forward end of the tube IS in substantially the direction shown in Figure 1. When the body I0 is advanced, it tends to travel along a gentle curvature, projecting the head l2 well into the field of vision.

By virtue of my present arrangement and construction of parts, especially with respect to the support of the operative head [2, the view obtained through the telescope I5 is substantially of the character illustrated in Figure 4. It is to be noted that the forward end of the O-shaped element I4 is shown at the bottom of Figure 4, and it will be understood that advancement of the electrode further into the field of vision will cause the element I4 to travel upwardly, as viewed in Figure 4, thereby advancing the head I2 further and further toward the center of the field ,of vision. It is further to be noted that my present construction permits the surface 2| of the head l2 to be clearly visible through the telescope throughout all manipulations of the electrode, and this is of extreme importance since it is this region of the surface of the head 12 which actually contacts with the tissue to be treated. In the ordinary construction, this portion of the electrode head 12 is invisible, and the actual point of contact can be only approximately determined and controlled by viewing the upper or opposite surface of the head [2.

The improved visibility mentioned in the preceding paragraph is the direct result of the present construction whereby the head is mounted upon a stem which projects forwardly, and pref erably at a slight obliquity, from the forward end of an O-shaped conductive element of the character illustrated, since this element permits visibility of the head from an axially disposed, rearward point of vision, and along a line of visibility extending through the element [4.

In Figures 5 and 6, I have illustrated a slight- 1y modified construction showing the manner in which the same general objective might be obtained by the use of only a single wire 22, at the forward end of which an operative head 23 is mounted. This wire projects from the forward end of an elongated electrode body 24, communicating at its rear end with a conductive member mounted in the body 24, and the wire is caused to be bowed laterally out of the line of visibility of the head 23. This lateral convexity of the wire 22 is illustrated most clearly in Figure 5, which is a view taken from the top, i. e., from the side of the body 24 along which the telescope is to be arranged. The visibility of the head 23 is of improved character, and the vision through the telescope would appear substantially like that shown in Figure 4, except that the left-hand branch of the O-shaped element l4 would be absent.

The body 24 preferably embodies a gentle curvature of the character hereinbefore mentioned, and the general nature of this curvature is illustrated in Figure 6. It is also to be noted that the wire 22 is caused to curve along a direction forming a substantial continuation of this set curvature of the body 24, thereby positioning the head 23 in substantially the same relationship as the head l2 of Figure 1.

In accordance with my present invention, the rear end of the conductive member H is caused to project slightly beyond the rear end of the insulating tube In, as illustrated most clearly in Figure 3, and it is permanently connected to a laterally extending terminal member 25. This member is exteriorly threaded and is inclined slightly toward the rear, being at approximately 105 to the axis of the body H].

A handle 26 is adapted to be removably associated with the terminal member 25, and with this object in view, the handle 26 is composed of an outer sleeve or tube of insulating material and an inner conductive bushing 2'! which is threaded to engage over the member 25, as illustrated in Figure 3. Within the rear portion of the handle is an electric connector device 28 which may be of any suitable construction, preferably being of the longitudinally split type which permits a connection plug to make electrical connection therewith by merely inserting the plug into the rear end of the device 28. This connector device is obviously electrically connected with the bushing 21 so that an electrical connection may be readily established for conducting electric current to the operative head at the forward end of the electrode.

Inasmuch as the handle 26 is the portion which the operator grasps and wields in manipulating the electrode, it is of importance to rigidify the connection between the handle and the electrode. To accomplish this purpose my present invention provides a sleeve 29, prefererably of insulating material, which engages simultaneously around the rear end of the body l0 and around the forward end of the handle 26, thereby virtually interlocking these elements. The sleeve 29 is provided with an axial bore through its forward portion, adapted to engage around the rear end of the body I0, and this bore merges at its rear end with a radial slot 30 of at least the width of the bore. At its forward end the slot 30 is enlarged to form a recess 3| shaped and configured to snugly accommodate the forward end of the handle 26 when the latter is screwed into position.

In assembling the parts, the sleeve 29 is first applied over the rear end of the body I0. It is shifted forwardly to a sufficient extent to permit the terminal member 25 then to be secured to the rear end of the member ll. The-sleeve 29 is then slid rearwardly into substantially the position of Figure 3; and finally the handle 26 is screwed onto the terminal member 25, the forward end of the handle accommodating itself snugly and rigidly in the recess 3|.

The advantageous features of the rigidifying construction are further illustrated in Figure '1, showing the manner in which this mode of assembly and construction may be used in connection with a slidable or movable electrode. In this figure, I have illustrated an electrode body 32 which consists, as before, of the elongated tubular element of insulating material. The inner tubular conductive member 33, corresponding to the member I I, does not extend in this construction for the full length of the body 32 but terminates a few inches forwardly of the rear end. As before, a laterally extending terminal member 34 is connected to the rear end of the member 33, and it is to be noted that the connection is such as to leave the rear end of the member 33 open. A handle 35 is adapted to be screwed onto the member 34, and its forward end is adapted to seat itself snugly and rigidly within a suitable recess provided in the sleeve 36. This sleeve is substantially of the same construction as that illustrated in Figure 3.

The device of Figure '7 includes an electrode element 31 which is an elongated wire or rod and which extends slidably through the member 33 and all the way through the body 32, projecting at the forward end and terminating in the electrode head 38. At the rear end, the electrode element 31 is connected to a handgrip 39.

The element 31 is caused to embody a preliminary permanent set slightly curved in the direction indicated, so that when the body 32 is inserted into a guide tube of the character shown at I9 in Figure 1, the back-and-forth shifting of the element 31, by means of the hand-grip 39, will cause the electrode head 38 to travel forwardly into the field of vision along substantially the same direction as the electrode heads previously described. The electrical connection is obviously established by virtue of the slidable relationship of the element 31 and the member 33.

In using the device of Figure '1, the operator grasps the handle 35 with one hand, and manipulates the hand-grip 39 with the other, and the rigidity with which the handle 35 is associated with the rear end of the electrode body is an important factor in permitting accurate and controllable manipulaton of the head 38.

Wherever the term operative head is used herein and in the appended claims, it is intended to refer to an element of the character typi- 5 fiedby the bulbous heads l2 and 23, this element being in each caseone which is adapted to be applied to tissue for the purpose of conductinghigh-frequency current to and. through the tissue which is contacted. In the illustrated embodi- 10 ments, each of the heads I2 and 23 is intended to be contacted with portions of tissue which are to be coagulated by high-frequency current, but it will be understood that this particular effect upon the tissue is not necessarily the only one 15 which an operative head may be caused to produce. It may be further pointed out that the term operative head is intended to distinguish the bulbous portion l2 or its equivalent from the conductive wire or wires which sup- 20 port this head, the supporting wires not being intended to contact with the tissue that is to be treated.

It will be obvious that changes in the details herein described and illustrated for the purpose 25 of explaining the nature of my invention may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims. It is therefore intended that these details be interpreted as illus- 30 trative, and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, and illustrated its use, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. The combination with a telescope com- 35 manding a substantially forward field of vision, of an electrode comprising an elongated body arranged alongside of the telescope, an O-shaped conductive element projecting from the forward end of said body and into the field of vision, a 4'0 through. 425:-

2. The combination with a telescope commanding a substantially forward field of vision,

of an electrode comprising an elongated tub-ular body arranged alongside of the telescope, a

conductive member extending through said body from an electric terminal at the rear end, a conductive wire projecting from the forward end of said body and into the field of vision, and an operative head at the tip of said wire, said wire being electrically connected at its rear end to 55 said conductive member and being bowed laterally out of the line of visibility of said head.

3. The combination with a telescope commanding a substantially forward field of vision, of an electrode comprising an elongated tubular body arranged alongside of the telescope, a conductive member extending through said body from an electric terminal at the rear end, an O-shaped conductive element projecting from the forward end of said body and into the field of vision, and an operative head supported at the forward end of said element, said element having its rear end electrically connected to said conductive member and being arranged to permit 70 visibility of the head therethrough.

4. An electrode of the character described, comprising an elongated body, an O-shaped conductive element projecting from the forward end of said body, and an operative, relatively en- 75 larged head supported at the forward end of said element, whereby said head may be viewed from the rear along a line of visibility extending through said element.

5. An electrode of the character described, comprising an elongated body, an O-shaped conductive element projecting from the forward end of said body, a stem projecting from the forward end of said element, and an operative head mounted on the tip of said stem, said head being thereby arranged along a line of visibility extending forwardly through said element.

6. An electrode of the character described, comprising an elongated body of insulating material, a conductive member in said body, a pair of conductive wires diverging forwardly from the forward end of said body and electrically connected with said conductive member, said wires converging at their forward ends to form an O-shaped element, a stem projecting forwardly from the converged ends of said wires, and an operative head mounted on the tip of said stem.

'7. In an electrode of the character described, an elongated body, a conductive member in said body, a laterally extending terminal member connected to the rear end of said conductive member, a handle engaging around said terminal member, and a sleeve engaging around the rear end of the electrode body and interlocking with the forward end of said handle.

8. In an electrode of the character described, an elongated body, a conductive member in said body, a. laterally extending terminal member connected to the rear end of said conductive member, a handle engaging around said terminal member, and a sleeve engaging around the rear end of the electrode body and provided with a recess adapted to accommodate the forward end of said handle.

9. In an electrode of the character described, an elongated body, a conductive member in said body, a laterally extending terminal member connected to the rear end of said conductive member and provided with screw threads, a handle adapted to screw into engagement with said terminal member and provided with an electric connector device, and a sleeve engaging around the rear end of the electrode body and provided with a recess into which the forward end of said handle is adapted to extend when the handle is screwed into position.

10. In an electrode of the character described, an elongated tubular body, a tubular conductive member in said body, an electrode element slidably accommodated in said tubular member and provided with an operative head at its foward end and with a hand-grip at its rear end, a laterally extending terminal member connected to the rear end of said conductive member, a handle engaging around the terminal member, and means for interlocking the rear end of the electrode body with the forward end of said handle.

11. In an electrode of the character described, an elongated tubular body, a tubular conductive member in said body, an electrode element slidably accommodated in said tubular member and provided with an operative head at its forward end and with a hand-grip at its rear end, a laterally extending terminal member connected to the rear end of said conductive member, and a sleeve engaging around the rear end of the tubular body and interlocking with the forward end of said handle.

12. In an electrode of the character described, an elongated tubular body, a tubular conductive member in said body, an electrode element slidably accommodated in said tubular member and provided with an operative head at its forward end and with a hand-grip at its rear end, a laterally extending terminal member connected to the rear end of said conductive member, and a sleeve engaging around the rear end of said tubular body and provided with a recess adapted to accommodate the forward end of said handle.

13. In an electrode of the character described, an elongated tubular body, a tubular conductive member in said body, an electrode element slidably accommodated in said tubular member and provided with an operative head at its forward end and with a hand-grip at its rear end, a Iaterally extending terminal member connected to the rear end of said conductive member and pro vided with screw threads, a handle adapted to screw into engagement with said terminal member and provided with an electric connector device, and a sleeve engaging around the rear end of said tubular body and provided with a recess into which the forward end of said handle is adapted to extend when the handle is screwed into position.

REINHOLD H. WAPPLER.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification606/49, 600/105
International ClassificationA61B18/14, A61B18/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B2018/00196, A61B18/1402
European ClassificationA61B18/14B