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Publication numberUS2047992 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 21, 1936
Filing dateApr 22, 1935
Priority dateApr 22, 1935
Publication numberUS 2047992 A, US 2047992A, US-A-2047992, US2047992 A, US2047992A
InventorsBerk Elmore R
Original AssigneeRepublic Steel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Highway guard
US 2047992 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 21, 1936. ER 2,047,992

HI GHWAY GUARD Filed April 22, 1935 2 Sheets-Sheet l E. R. BERK HIGHWAY GUARD July 21, 1936.

Filed April 22, 1935 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 i zzz tubular spring 3. (See Figures 5, 6, and 7.)

Patented July 21, 1936 UNITED STATES 2,047,992 HIGHWAY GUARD,

Elmore R. Berk, Canton, Ohio, assignor to Republic Steel Corporation, Youngstown, Ohio, a corporation of New Jersey Application April 22, 1935, Serial No. 17,583

9 Claims.

This invention relates to highway guards and particularly to new and improved means for supporting the guard rail and resisting forces to which the rail is subjected in -use.

My invention will be understood by reference to the drawings of embodiments of my invention which accompany and form a part of this specification.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary plan view of a highway guard embodying my invention.

Figure 2 is afragmentary elevational view of the highway guard shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is an enlarged detailed plan view partly in section taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a sectional elevational view taken on the line 4-4 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is an enlarged detailed sectional view taken on the line 5- -5 of Figure 2.

Figure 6 is a sectional view taken on the line 5-6 of Figure 5.

Figure 7 is a sectional view taken on the line 7-7 of Figure 6.

Figures 8 and 9 are plan and perspective views respectively, of a modified form of post spring connection.

Figures 10 and 11 are plan and elevational views respectively of a modified form of end construction.

With reference to the drawings Figures 1 and 2 thereof-illustrate a preferred embodiment of my invention which includes a plurality of supporting posts I and'end posts la positioned along a highway, and a metal rail member 2 extending past the posts I on the highway side thereof.

Each of the posts I is provided with a tubular spring member 3 and a curved rail supporting spring member 4, both of which are secured to the posts by bolt 5. The spring 4 extends from its post end through a slot 6 in the tubular spring 3. Its free end is secured to the rail 2 with an intervening spacer block 'las by means of a plurality of bolts 8. The spring 4 thus normally supports the'rail out of contact with the The rail 2 may consist of a plurality of sections secured together in end to end relation.

Figures 1, 3 and 4 illustrate means for applying longitudinal tension to the rail member. This means consists of an anchor which may take the form of a bolt 9 secured to the end post la having a stop ill thereon, a spring housing ll having a spring abutment l2, and a spring l3 mounted within the spring housing ll between the stop It] and the spring abutment l2. An

nally as well as transversely of the rail.

adjusting nut I4 is threaded on the end of the anchor ID for varying the compression of the spring I3.

Figures 8 and 9 illustrate a modified form of post spring connection including a tubular spring 5 I 5, and a curved spring member l6 secured at its midportion to the posts I, surrounding the tubular spring l5 and spaced therefrom, and normally supporting the rail 2 out of contact with the tubular spring. The ends of the spring l6 1 are secured to the rail 2 as at I611. and I 61). A supplemental spring I! may be positioned within the spring l5, if desired. The springs l5, l6 and I1 are secured to the post by means of bolt l8.

When light loads are applied to the rail at an 15 angle either between the posts or at one of the posts, the rail supporting springs and the end tensioning springs cooperate to resist and absorb such loads. When the loads are in excess of the load resisting ability of the rail supporting springs, the rail moves laterally and contacts with the tubular springs; Thereupon, the tubular springs as well as all the springs cooperate to resist and absorb such heavy loads applied longitudi- For example in the post spring construction illustrated in Figures 5, 6, and 7 the slot 6 permits the rail to move longitudinally to a limited extent under light loads applied to the rail. When under excessive loads the rail tends to move beyond said limited extent, the spacer blocks 1 engage the vertical side of the slots 6, and thereupon the tubular springs 3 also resist further longitudinal movement of the rail. Similarly, light loads applied transversely of the rail move the rail toward the posts, This movement is resisted by the springs 4 until the rail contacts with springs 3 when that spring also resists further movement of the rail. In the modified post spring construction illustrated in Figures 8 and 9 when light loads are applied longitudinally as well as laterally of the rail the rail supporting springs l6 permit the rail to move longitudinally as well as laterally to a limited extent and such light loads are resisted and absorbed by the springs l6 and the end springs l3. When loads are applied to the rail which are greater than the load resisting ability of the springs l6 these springs yield and the rail comes into contact with the tubular springs l5. The tubular springs I5 5 resist and. absorb the heavy loads. In this way the end and rail supporting springs cooperate to resist and absorb the light loads while all the springs cooperate to resist and absorb heavy loads.

Where the rail is subject to changes in temperature resulting in variations in the length of the rail due to expansion or contraction of the rail, the rail supporting springs and the end Figures 10 and 11 illustrate a modified form of end construction for applying longitudinal tension to the rail.

This construction comprises front and rear plates I 9 and 20, respectively, which are secured together and to the extremities of the rail. Longitudinally extending, substantially semi-tubular portions 2| and 22 are formed in the plates I9 and 20 respectively, so that when the plates are assembled these portions form spring housings 23 which are provided with spring abutments 24. Anchor means which may take the form of bolts 25 extend into the housings 23 and are provided with stops 26. A spring 21 is mounted within each of the housings 23 between the spring abutment 24 and the stop 26. A nut 28 is threaded on the end of each of the bolts 25 for varying the compression of the springs 21 on the rail 2. The portion 22 of the rear plate 20 is preferably cut away as at 29 to provide access to the adjusting nuts 28.

Having thus described my invention so that those skilled in the art may be able to practice the same what I desire to secure by Letters Patent is defined in what is claimed.

What I claim is:

1. A highway guard including a plurality of posts, a metal rail extending past a plurality of said posts, tubular springs at the posts, and other springs at the posts extending beyond the tubular springs and positioning the rail normally out of contact with the tubular springs.

2. A highway guard including a plurality ofposts, a rail extending past a plurality of said posts, tubular springs at the posts other springs at the posts supporting the rail normally out of contact with the tubular springs; the said other springs being resistant to light loads and yieldable under heavy loads applied lengthwise and.

transversely of the rail, the tubular springs being resistant to heavy loads applied lengthwise and transversely of the rail and transmitted to them springs being resistant to light loads and yield- -posts, a rail extending past a plurality of said able under heavy loads applied lengthwise and able under heavy loads applied lengthwise and transversely of the rail, the several springs at any post cooperating to resist heavy loads applied lengthwise as well as transversely of the rail.

4. A highway guard including a plurality of 5 posts, a rail extending past a plurality of said posts, tubular springs at the posts, other springs at the posts supporting the rail normally out of contact with the tubular springs, a rail tensioning spring anchored at the ends of said rail and resistant to light loads applied lengthwise of the rail, the several springs cooperating 'to resist heavy loads applied lengthwise as well as transversely of the rail.

5. A highway guard including a plurality of 15 posts, a rail member extending past a plurality, of said posts, anchor means at the ends of the rail resistant to light loads applied lengthwise of the rail, tubular spring members mounted on the highway side of said posts, and other spring 20 members normally supporting the rail out of contact with the tubular springs, the said other springs being resistant to light loads and yieldable under heavy loads.

6 A highway guard including a plurality of 25 posts, a rail member extending past a plurality of said posts, rail supporting spring members mounted on said posts, and tubular spring members mounted on the posts between the rail and the posts and being normally out of contact with the rail and provided with openings through which said first mentioned spring members extend.

7. A highway gua'rd including a plurality of posts, a rail member extending past a plurality of said posts, rail supporting spring members mounted on said posts, and tubular spring members mounted on the posts between the rail and the posts and within the rail supporting springs and being normally out of contact with the rail.

8. A highway guard including a plurality of posts, a rail member extending past a plurality of said posts, rail supporting spring members mounted on said posts, tubular spring members mounted on the posts between the rail and the posts and within the rail supporting springs and being normally out of contact with the rail, and supplemental springs positioned within said tubular springs.

9. A highwayguard including a plurality of posts, tubular springs at the posts, other springs at the posts supporting the rail normally out of contact with the tubular springs, the said other springs being resistantto light loads and yield- ELMORE R. BERK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3290014 *Apr 13, 1964Dec 6, 1966Stapleton Mathew HAdjustable gate apparatus
US3360244 *Feb 26, 1964Dec 26, 1967Edwin BucherProtective device on roads
US5797592 *Jun 16, 1997Aug 25, 1998Energy Absorption Systems, Inc.Roadside energy absorbing barrier with improved fender panel fastener
US6276667 *Oct 15, 1999Aug 21, 2001W. Eugene ArthurEnergy dissipating system for a concrete barrier
US6533250 *Aug 20, 2001Mar 18, 2003W. Eugene ArthurEnergy dissipating system for a concrete roadway barrier
US20040051321 *Sep 17, 2003Mar 18, 2004Isao HanaiShock-absorbing bumper device
US20040079932 *Oct 21, 2003Apr 29, 2004Isao HanaiShock-absorbing guardrail device
DE1273557B *Dec 22, 1960Jul 25, 1968Margarete Kleinemeier Geb SchuLeiteinrichtung fuer Strassen zum Abfangen von von der Fahrbahn abirrenden Fahrzeugen
EP1777346A1 *Oct 12, 2006Apr 25, 2007Voest-Alpine Krems Finaltechnik GmbHSpacer for mounting a gurad rail to a post
WO2001029323A2 *Oct 4, 2000Apr 26, 2001Arthur W EugeneEnergy dissipating system for a concrete roadway barrier
WO2001029323A3 *Oct 4, 2000Sep 13, 2001W Eugene ArthurEnergy dissipating system for a concrete roadway barrier
Classifications
U.S. Classification256/13.1
International ClassificationE01F15/02, E01F15/04
Cooperative ClassificationE01F15/0438
European ClassificationE01F15/04B6