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Publication numberUS2048220 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 21, 1936
Filing dateAug 6, 1934
Priority dateAug 6, 1934
Publication numberUS 2048220 A, US 2048220A, US-A-2048220, US2048220 A, US2048220A
InventorsRedding Daniel P
Original AssigneeRedding Daniel P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vertebral adjusting appliance
US 2048220 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 21, 1936.

DL P. REDDING VERTEBRAL ADJUSTING APPLIANCE Filed Aug. 6, 1934 WNY INVENTOR.

Patented July 21, 1936 UNITED STATES VERTEBRAL AnJUs'riNG APPLIANCE Daniel ifaeaig, Kansas city, AppneaumY August s, 1934, serial No. 733,671 16 claims. (01.12849) My inventionlrelates to appliances for use by chiropractors in` adjusting SliblltxaL-tiurisr` of the vertebrae. It is 4adapted for manual application to the patient by the practitioner.V e" Therobjectsof inventien are:

1.' To provide an improved process for adjusting vertebral subluxa-tions; Y 2,- To provide a light, simple, durable and easily operated and easily controlled appliance which loi can be utilized in giving chiropractic adjustments, of such a nature that force can be applied to the' Spine or to any given vertebra 'and readily directed in any desired-direction, or in any desired line of drive;

` 3, To provide an appliance scribed:V Y

(a) 'By which the amount of force to lbe applied in any given instance can be'regulated and pre-V determined by the operator with great' accuracy;

e (o) By which the same amount of force can be applied in successive adjustments;

(c) By which the amount of force applied in successive adjustments can be either-increased or diminished froml time totiine;

" ftd) 'By `which a 4uni-form freedom of recoil can be assured;

'(e) By which a uniformly short length of time during which the adjusting force is applied, can be assured;

of the 'crass dete? (f) ABy which the amount of force to applied in any'given instance can be denitely'predeterr'nined independently of the physical or mental o r nervous condition of the operator; `(fyiA By which the operator canY be assured 325V against the application of excessive Vferce or thev application of insuicient force for a given adjust# men-t;

j (fh) By which a chiropractor can administer the desired adjustment even' though lacking in 40* the physical strength necessary to' administer it entirely by theruse of his own hahcls,v and even though 'he lacks the experience, practice and physicalV training necessary to .enable him te perform such Van adjustment manually and Without 5' the' use of an ,auxiliary appliance; ci' By which a predeternnned amount of torque can Iloe applied inconnection with the applicationof the necessary pressure or lirripa'ct upon 50 theV spine or any particular vertebra thereof, in

making a chiropractic adjustment; A

(75) By which the torque may lbe applied in either-.direction in connection with the impact'or pressure upon the vertebra in the course of ad spi` justment;

(1c) By which the amount .of torque utilized iny giving adjustments may be varied;

(l) By which the force applied in giving an" adjustment maybe localized and applied to a more restricted area than when such adjustments are administered by hand alone;

(m) By which `resilient bodies of varying de; grees of hardness and resiliency may -be utilized for manual application to the subluxated spine or vertebrae for adjustment thereof; l@

(ni By which resilient bodies of varying sizes rnay ibe` utilized for manual application to the subluxated spine or vertebrae for adjustment thereof.`

I attain these objects .by the means illustrated 15 3 Figure l; 20

Y Figure' 3 is an enlarged detail of the front end of my appliance;

Figure 4 is a detail view of the plunger, ,8,1 show; ing. it turned about a quarter of a revolution from the position shown in Figure 1 with a straight 25 groove, 32, at the front thereof;

Figure 51s a detail showing the sight, l', formed therein.

For convenience I refer to the left of Figure 1' asthe front and to the right of Figure 1 as the 3U rear.

Similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the several views.

My appliance comprises a barrel, l, having a cylindrical cap, 2, threaded upon the front endl 35 thereof and a cylindrical cap, 25, threadedv upon the rear end thereof.

A plunger, 6, is slidably mounted Within the barrel Vthe rear end of which projects intoJ or through a bore formed in the prolonged end of 4U the rear cap, 25. A head, 6',isformed at the front ef the plunger, 6. An annular stop, 23,A is seatedl in the barrel, I, or may be formed integral therewith .and al spacer, 24, is seated in the rear of the barrel between the stop 23, and the cap, ,25,

An opening or sight, Ii', is yleft in the side ofthe' barrel, l, a inne in front of the trigger 12. The plunger, 6, is calibrated .and has marked on the' side thereof numerals, I, which maybe used` to` indicate a calibrationthereof either in pounds or any other desired form. If desired,- the cali'A brationmarks' may be placed at the rear of the' plunger, v8, so that they can read from the pori tion of the plunger, 8, projecting to the rear ofthe" barrel, when in charged position. 55"

sizes of instruments. A secondary plunger, 8, is slidingly mountedr within a central bore formed inthe cap, 2, and

extends lengthwise thereof. A resilient head, 8', of rubber or otherA suitable material, ismounted upon therearjen'd ofthe plunger,`8; adjacent a collar, 8", which is mountedupon or formed integral with the plunger, 8.

with a collar, 5, formed integraltlirewithland upon the Vfront end of said plungerand .thecol-` lar, 5, a resilient head, 4, is mounted.: This head,

4, is preferably made of ru'lo'k'ierf?v Afplurality of .2 heads, 4, may be provided with each .apparatusvv of diierent sizes and different degrees of re-"f" silienceiandhardness.andthese heads are made readily removableisothat they .'.canbe easily exchanged as required fordiiferent'- cases Spiral grooves,-3|. and-3,l, are; cut inthe face the pin,-.29f,' inA one Vofi the'V grooves, andfwhen-sol he1d,: the fpin, i 29,-,wi11 1 causea .turning orL Vtwisting motion of the plungergl, wheneverl itis moved longitudinally within; the. cap,12. 2 1: f"

When the pin, 29, is inserted in the'straight posite direction'respectively when thev plunger, 8'; is drivenlongitudinally of, the barrel, I, andtheA @gpg-J2, ir. f ,Y

The plunger or rod,{6, basi-formed 'tl1ereon...a lockfc'ornprisinga plurality of'teeth, :6b',..and upon its opposite side-.is :providedfwith va plurality? of Y inclined'notches,*6.;i fr. l

A handle, I4, is united toiv the barrel., near the rearthereof, with f side plates, 1.5,. secured thereto'v by pins, 21. "Tle'ffront ofthe upper portion' of the. vhandle iis `-slotted f to receive aitrigl ge'r;`i |2,-the 'upper-'fend of whichmaybe pvoted u 'onf' pivots,26, threaded into the handleiand'v handlewhich bears againstthe lower( portion of thetrigg'erin a forward direotionlandagainst f adepti. ed ,tefheld j the trigger in `the charged? position, triggeflfs provided. .withfa Cathgll! which iilrojects' inton and lits against the urearI walls4 ofthe notches, Bf, actsv tofrestrainthe plunger; against.; forward; travelv whenpfi-rlmanually, the .catch I2:,. is withdrawn from. 2con-r.

.pivotally secured upon the pivot,l 22. The front end of the plunger, 8, is provided ....barrel,vv A|,vhavinga small opening upon the rear l5 ,y face thereofwhich'is adapted to receive a ball, I 6, carried by the charging lever, 9, and to'rretain tact with the notches, 6", vand the spring,1,

drives the plunger, 6, forward. Y

The handle, I4, is provided with an upward extension in which a pivot, 22, is secured and upon this pivot is mounted a gear wheel, l0, the teeth 5 Y of which correspond to the teeth, 6b, of the plunger, 6, the wheel, I0, being adapted to actuate Y the plunger to place same in the charged position and to be actuated by the plunger, 6, when travelingforward, j

A charging lever, 9, h sa fork, i9', at its lower end whichvstraddles the gear wheel, l0, andis A detent, 28, is mounted upon or formedintegral Vwith the the charging lever, .9, in its downward or latched positione Y f The b'all, I6, is Vsecured at'the front or upper 20 end of the charging leven. rbyalap; .Hkwhich sthreaded upon Vthe forward or upper endrof the;,1ever,9, and ,a compression spring, Y I8,.,is mounted Withina suitable bore formedin theV free end of the chargingleverfS, and bears against 25 thevrloall,A ,I,6 .so'as toucause the ball' toretain the charging lever in the. position Ashown in dottedv lines in Figurel, with a light pressure whichv may be overcomemanually bytheoperator when the.

V for-wardend of .the. lever, V9, ,is pulled upwardly.V

or away from the barrel,",|,., Y u Y,

A threwrm; pawl,. l l, is f pvcltally mounted Y within,tlfieuforkofv theylever,`9.by apivot pin or other suitable means, 2|. VA spring, Y2|),V has one end securedto the leven-.9, by a pin.. 20a,. The free end of the spring, 20, bears against one .arni ofthe pawl, ||and tends to secure thepawl in engagement with the teeth .of the gearfwheel, 0.1 The pawl, Il, is provided. with, an upwardly ex; tendingA arm lor ingerrwhiohv mayvreadily be o pressed ubythe. thumb of. theoperator rand thev pawl be thus'disengagedv from the gear. wheel, I0. The, third arm orfinger ofthe pawl, I|,. is adapted to engagethe, uppersurface ofthebarrel when the charging lever, ,9, is vreturnedto the position shown in dotted lines in Figure Il and to hold the pawl, I,;outoi engagementwith theV teeth-of the gear whee1 ,||l. ,3 im; Y

A collar, 8,V is formed Vnear the rearpeirid.2 of?V the plunger, 9., which will contact with thecap.v 2, and act-.as `aietent tokprevent .the plunger, 8, from being projected entirely out of the barrelp and Cap, 2; r f ci; f ,-In the Voperation.of my .device-the charging lever, ,9, Visvrai'sed from the horizontal to `the obliqueV position shown in Figure 1,g and as itv is raised, carries the pawl, I l, with it. The spring,l 20,;.actingupon one arm.. of the pawl, causes the pawl-to engage with the teeth of the gealwheel; |0. AAsthe charging;.levler iswthen .moved forl; wardly anddownwardlyfthe gearwheel carries theplunger, 6, to. the .rear and the notches,` 6I',

. are engaged by the catch, |2'.ofY the trigger, I 2,'v

f andthe plunger, k6, is thus retained invits' par?` tially charged position. The'lever, 9, may then 65.- be again raisedand lowered and vthe plunger, 6, moved still farther to' therearwhere itAis againv detained by the trigger and 'this operation repeated'until the desired position of the plunger,v 6, is reached. "5' V1 f The pawl, |I,4 is thenV released from 4theA gear wheelby the thumb Vpressure upon the upwardlyV extending arm of thell'pawl, and-'the charging leverlocked in the position shown in. dottedlines in Figure 1 parallel to the barrel; fi; z.-'f;

l"Tl'le-'plungerli, is shown itsl charged position inf` dotted lines, 6a, 6'a and 6"a. When the plunger, 6, has .been locked in its charged position, the plunger, 8, is manually pushed to the rear s o that'the head, 8,', comes into contact With-the head of the plunger, 8, and the head, 4, is-in-the position shown in dotted lines as 4a.

The appliance is'thenplaced in position relativeto the patient so that the head, 4, is in 'contact with the patients back in the desired position relative to the portion of the" spine or vertebra to which the adjustingV force is 1 to be applied-the pin, 29, having been previously seated in one ofthe grooves, 3| or 3|', so as to produce the desired torquev or the pin, 29, may have been removed entirely so as to avoid the application of any torque. The barrel is then carefully alined 'in the'desired direction in which it is desired `to have the adjusting forceV applied. The appliance is then held firmly by the operator and the trigger pulled. When the trigger is pulled, the plunger, 6, will be forced by :the spring, 1, forwardly with the force corresponding'to the degree to which the spring, 1, has been compressed in the charging operation. The plunger, 6, transmits its force to the plunger, 8, and in turn to the head, 4, from which it is transmitted to the patient.

The spring, 1, bearing against the stop, 23, will naturally cause a recoil of the barrel, I, as the plunger, 8, and head, 4, are pressed against the back of the patient. Any recoil movement of the barrel will tend to carry with it the plunger, 6and thus leave a short space withinwhich the plunger, 8, itself may recoil to the rear after the pressure'of the plunger, 6, thereon has bee withdrawn. I prefer to proportion the parts of my apparatus so that the spring, 1, will not extend far enough at any time to hold the head of the plunger, 6, in contact with the head, 8', of the plunger 8, when in its forwardmost position so that there will normally be a certain distance in which the plunger, 8, is free to recoil. However, I do not limit my claims to an appliance of fixed size or proportions, but the various parts of my appliance may be Vvaried to suit the requirements ofdifferent cases. Y My process is-carried out by the use of the apparatus just described and will be readily understood by those skilled in the chiropractic art. v'It is a matter of common knowledge among chiropractors `that different vertebral subluxationsY require diierent lines of drive of the force applied to correct them; also that some subluxations may require a certain amount of torque or'twisting movement to the right and others may require a torque to the left. Y

For convenience and clearness inthe claims, I have referred to the plunger orrod, 6, as the driving rod or rod and-to the plunger or rod,=8, as the plungerz v-For convenience I shall refer to the 4direct force applied to the spine in adjusting a subluxation as the drive or driving force and to the rotary or twisting movement sometimes applied in giving such adjustments as the torque, which may be either to the right or left as the case may be. I shall also refer to the direction in which the direct force is applied as the line of drive. v

Itis a matter of common knowledge among chiropractors that the amount of force necessarytc adjust subluxated vertebrae differs widely in different` eases, depending somewhat upon the age and muscular development of the patient, the nature, position and extent of the subluxation, the length of time which has elapsed since the subluxation occurred and other factors it is unnecessary to specify.

It is also a matter of common knowledge that itl is important for chiropractor practitioner to develop a high degree of strength and agility in the muscles of his hands and arms to enable him to administer adjustments generally with the desired success.

It is well known that the correction of subluxatons inl many cases occurs during what is commonly known as the recoil rather than during the application of the driving force.

We find in practice that two forces are in. concussion, the invasionary force being delivered by the operator or the instrument and the resistance force being returned and coming from the object struck. The subluxation is not ad- 204i justed by the invasionary force alone, neither is the subluxation adjusted by the resistance force from within alone; but the adjustment of a subluxated vertebra takes place when the two forces come in contact each with the other; the body 251" is driven away from and then recoils. It is during this recoil reaction upon the part of the body that the actual correct repositioning of the subluxated vertebra takes place.

In other words, there is a certain amount of 305 the blow or impact in proportion to the force 33:

applied, and as soon as the force of the blow or impact ceases or is removed, the natural resilience of the spinal structures causes a rebound or reaction which is commonly called a recoil.A This recoil is an important element in accomplishing the return of the subluxated vertebra to its normal position.

'Ihese conditions render it necessary that any process of adjustment, to be successful, must involve the application of the proper or requisite' 5 amount of force or direct drive upon the proper portion of the spine and this force must be directed in the proper direction. Such process must also permit full freedom of recoil or reaction. v

My apparatus provides means by which the direction of the drive can be accurately controlled. 'Ihe driving rod slides longitudinally of the barrel. It is obvious then that if the contact head, 4, be placed in contact with the backof a patient at the desired point, the barrel may be inclined so that it points in the direction in which it is desired to have the force applied and as the trigger is pulled and the driving rod, 6, moves forward in the barrel, the driving force will necessarily be applied in the direction in which the barrel is pointed.

My apparatus also provides means by which the amount of force to be applied by direct drive can be regulated or predetermined. The length of the driving rod, 6, and of the rack formed by the teeth, Bb, is such that the driving rod may be retracted to various degrees measured by the notches, 6". As the rod, 6, is retracted, its head exerts pressure upon the coiled spring,` 1, and compresses it, the coiled spring, 1, being made of suitable size to afford the maximum desired amount of force when the driving rod is retracted toV the last notch, 6, and to afford inter- 752' mediate degrees of force'forthe intermediate notches. c y ,l

The spring, 1, and the travel of the drivingrod,

6, are intended to bev soproportioned that whenY tended to be proportional to the varyindgrees of force which chiropractors have'found it necessary to utilize ingiving adjustments manually.

Itis obvious that my appliance maybe made so as to be able to deliver an impact of greater force than could be delivered manually in the ordinary way, and where'a chiropractor has insuf-4 ficient strength to apply the desired amountnof force, my appliance will afford a ready means of applying a greater force thanV he cando by the use ofhis hands alone.;A Y

Likewise, it has been found that many persons do not possess the requisite agility-that is, they do not have ,sufficientlyl rapid control of theirfmuscular movements-to vdeliver a sudden impact by hand and then withdraw the hand with sufficient rapidity to permit a free recoil of the patient. My apparatus obviously can be depended upon l to permit asudden recoil because-the actionof 'thespring 1, will naturally cause certain inertia in the drivingrod, 16 which will tend, to carry it somewhat beyond the normal length of the spring,

i; 1,- and as the spring .pressure is thus `removed from it, Vthe driving rod; 5, will be free l.tour'eturn as the plunger, 8, is driven backward bythe recoil of the patient acting upon the resilient head, 4. The resilience of the head, 4, will also assist in this recoil movement, f Y* v Instead of the torque or twisting movementy of Vthe hand or hands of the operator inadjusting,

my apparatus providesfor a torque or twisting movement of the head, 4, which takes the place 'of the torque delivered by the; operator `directly and maybe eitherl increased or diminished by the loperato-1' by turning lthehandle, I either to the f right or `left as may be desired at the time the trigger is pulled.\

I do not limit my claims to the precise form of apparatus herejshown nor tothe exact. descriptionofmy process above set out, but claim broadly both apparatus and process and their equivalents. m f 1 ".Iclaim: Y f

'1. In a vertebral adjusting appliance, a barrel, a pistolgrip united thereto, a driving rod s lid-A ingly ymounted in the barrel, a plunger mounted in the front end of thebarrel, a head united to the Afront end of the plunger, ahelical spring mountedwithin the barrel adapted to exert pressure rearwardly against the barrel and forwardly against the driving rod, a trigger mounted inthe grip having acatch formed integral therewith, notches formed inthe one side of the driving rod 'adapted to be engaged by the catch 'of Ythe trig-v pawl pivoted in the fork of the setting lever adapted toengage the teeth 'ofthe wheel and to actuate same when the setting Vlever ismoved forwardly from itsvertical to a horizontal position, spring-,j-V actuated means wfor'holding thepawl in engage-` Y ment with the teeth of the wheeL/andmanually operable means for releasing theV pawl. i 7' 5 y 2. Infa vertebral adjusting appliance, a barrel,

a grip united thereto, a driving Vrod slidably mounted Yin, the barrel, a plunger mounted'in; the front end; ofthe barrel, a head united'to` the front Y end. f 'the plunger, reslientmeans V,Irwunted withe 1.o: in the Ybarrel adapted, when in `charged position, to exert.; pressure rearwardly against the barrel` and forwardly against thejdriving'rod, a trigger mounted in the grip, means by whichthe rod can be retained in charged position and released when f Y the trigger is pulled, agsettinglever one end of which is forked, having itsforkedend pivotally united to the barrel, a slot in the upper face oi the barrel adjacent to said forka'toothed wheel ref, volvablyV mounted within the fork upon the set` 20,` ting lever pivota pawl pivoted inthe 'forkfof the setting Vlever adapted tov engage the teeth ,of the wheel andto actuate samefwhen the setting lever is moved' forwardly from itsl verticalgto allori- Zontal position, spring-actuated means forholdfv ing the pawl in engagement Withthe teeth Of the wheel, andA manually operable means forreleasing the pawl.V

3. VIn a vertebral Yadjusting appliance, la barrel, a pistol grip united thereto,V a driving rod slid-r 39*- ably mounted in the barrel, a plunger mounted in the front end of thebarrel, a resilienthead united to `therfront end of the plunger, afhelical spring mounted within the barrel adapted to exert pressure rearwardly. against thenbarreland for- 35::

'wardly against therdrivingrod, atrigger mounted in the Vgrip having a catch formed integraltheref with,fnotches formed in the one side of the .driving rod adaptedto be engagedV by the catch .oftheV trigger by which the rod can beV retained Vin 40 charged position and releasedwhen the trigger is pulled, and manually operable means united to Vthe barrel `by which the driving rod can.` be placed in charged position and so held until Vre-f leased by pulling the trigger.V Y

4. In a vertical adjusting appliance, Aa barrel, aV grip e united, thereto, a.drivingl rod slidably mounted in the barrel, a plunger mOllIltedin the front end .of the'barrel, a head united toI the front endv of the,y plunger; resilient meansmount-Y 5,0 eddwithin the barreladapted, when in lchargedV position, to exert pressurerearwardly against the barreland forwardly against the,v driving` rod,;a trigger mounted in the grip,'means by whichthe Y rod can be retained in charged position and re-Y leased when the triggeris pulled, and manually operable means united to the barrel by which'the driving rod can be placed in charged position and Vand forwardly against the driving rod, a trigger mounted in the grip, adjustable means by. which the rod can be retained in charged position and released when the trigger is pulled, Aa setting lever 70.;

one end of which is forked, having,V its forked end pivotally united to the barrel,`.a slot in the upperffaceof the barrel adjacent to saidfo'rk, a. toothedV Vwheel revolvably` mounted ,within the fork upon .the setting lever pivot, apawl pivoted 7.5i

in ,the fork lof fthe :setting :lever .adaptedwto Ienga'ge the teeththewneel and 4tofactuate same when; the -settingfflever is-g .moved forwardly `from i its verticalto; a` horizontal, position, spring-actuated means fior iholdi-ne the rawl -in .engagement 1 with the teetlrfefnthe wheel;A and manually Operable means hforreleasing therewi. f

6. In a vertebral adjustingappliance,asbarrel, a; grip;v united thereto,v a driving rodv slidably mounted in i the, barrel,- a plunger: mounted-in the frontend ofthe barrel, ahead united togthe front end of the plunger, -resilientmeans,- j mounted within the-barrel adapted, whenin. charged posi-- tion, ltoefexert pressure: rearWardlyf-against the barreland-,forwardly against the driving rod, av trigger mountedinthe grip, adjustable-means by which therodcan be retained in charged position and released when theftrigger isv pulled, and manually operablef` means united yto the.barrelj by Whichjthe-fdrivi-ng rodean be placed in charged position and so held until released by pulling the trigger.

7. In a vertebral adjusting'appliance, a barrel, a pistol grip united thereto, a driving rod slidably mounted in the barrel, a plunger mounted in the front end of the barrel adapted to be actuated by the driving rod when released from charged position, a resilient head united to the front end. of the plunger, a helical spring mounted within the barrel adapted to exert pressure rearwardly against the barrel and forwardly against the driving rod, a trigger mounted in the grip, a catch formed on the trigger, notches formed in one side of the driving rod adapted to be engaged by the catch of the trigger by which the rod can be retained in charged position and released when the trigger is pulled, and manually operable means united to the barrel by which the driving rod can be placed in charged position and so held until released by pulling the trigger.

8. In a vertebral adjusting appliance, a barrel, a pistol grip united thereto, a driving rod slidably mounted in the barrel, a plunger mounted in the front end of the barrel adapted to be actuated by the driving rod when released from charged position, resilient heads united to both ends of the plunger, a helical spring mounted within the barrel adapted to exert pressure rearwardly against the barrel and forwardly against the driving rod, a trigger mounted in the grip, a catch formed onV the trigger, notches formed in one side of the driving rod adapted to be engaged by the catch of the trigger by which the rod can be retained in charged position and released when the trigger is pulled, and manually operable means united to the barrel by which the driving rod can be placed in charged position and so held until released by pulling the trigger.

9. In a vertebral adjusting appliance, a barrel, a grip united thereto, a driving rod slidably mounted in the barrel, a plunger mounted in the front end of the barrel adapted to be actuated by thedriving rod when released from charged position, heads united to both ends of the plunger, means mounted within the barrel adapted, when in charged position, to exert pressure rearwardly against the barrel and forwardly against the driving rod, a trigger mounted in the grip, means by which the rod can be retained in charged position and released when the trigger is pulled, and manually operable means united to the barrel by which the driving rod can be placed in charged position and so held until released by pulling the trigger.

10. In a vertebral adjusting appliance, a barrel,

lengthwisein the capa resilient head unitedto 10 thefrontend of the plunger, a spring mounted withinY the barrel adapted to exert pressure rearwardlyagainst the-barrel and forwardly-against the ,driyfing-rodand cause the` driving rod tol actuate thefplunger when released from charged position, a triggerl vmounted in the grip, notches formed in onemside of the driving rodadapted to be vengagedjbyftheoatch of the triggerby which the rod can ,bev retained in charged vposition and released when the4 trigger-is pul1ed,-and manually 20.;

operable means united to the barrel by which the driving rod can be placed in charged position and so held until released by pulling the trigger.

11. In a vertebral adjusting appliance, a barrel,

` a cylindrical cap threaded upon the front end 25 thereof, a pistol grip united to the barrel, a driving rod slidably mounted in the barrel, a plunger slidably mounted in the front end of the barrel and the cylindrical cap and having oppositely directed spiral grooves cut in the periphery 30 thereof, a removable pin seated in the cap with its inner end adapted to seat in either of said grooves and cause the plunger to rotate as it moves lengthwise in the cap, a resilient head united to the front end of the plunger, resilient 35 means within the barrel adapted to exert pressure rearwardly against the barrel and forwardly against the driving rod and cause the driving rod to actuate the plunger when released from charged position, a trigger mounted in the grip a catch formed on the trigger, notches formed in one side of the driving rod adapted to be engaged by the catch of the trigger by which the rod can be retained in charged position and released When the trigger is pulled, and manually operable means united to the barrel by which the driving rod can be placed in charged position and so held until released by pulling the trigger.

12. In a vertebral adjusting appliance, a barrel, a cylindrical cap threaded upon the front end thereof, a grip united to the barrel, a driving rod slidably mounted in the barrel, a plunger slidably mounted in the front end of the barrel, a cap adapted to be actuated by the driving rod when released from `charged position, the cylindrical cap having oppositely directed spiral grooves cut in the periphery thereof, a removable pin seated in the cap with its inner end adapted to seat in either of said grooves and cause the plunger to rotate as it moves lengthwise in the cap, a resilient head united to the front end of the plunger, resilient means within the barrel adapted to exert pressure rearwardly against the barrel and forwardly against the driving rod and cause the driving rod to actuate the plunger when released from charged position, and means adapted to detain the rod in charged position and to suddenly release it therefrom.

13. The process of adjusting a subluxated ver- 70 tebra which consists of manually applying thereto a resilient pressure head, and mechanically causing the resilient head to rapidly exert a predetermined pressure upon a single vertebra continuing through a predetermined direction of 75 6 i travel, which pressure is automatically'instantly released and the pressure head withdrawnautoinati'cally when the predetermined travel 'has been completed. y Y Y e' v14. The process of' adjusting subluxated ver,-A tebrae whichconsistssof manually applying there# to' a resilientl pressure head, and mechanically.

determined pressure upon a single vertebra caus-V ing'it to travel; through a predetermined distance and direction, which pressure is automatically instantlyy released when the predeterminedtravel hasrbeen completed and the pressure head with'-` drawnlwith suicient rapidity to avoid'any in# terference with the natural return of the vertebra. to its normal position. Y` l R16.A `1The process of adjusting a subluxated vertebra'whi'ch consists of manually applying thereto `a resilient v'pressure head, and mechanically causingV theY resilient head to rapidly exert a pre' determined pressure upon a single vertebra 'conf' tinuing through apredetermined direction and with, a torque or twistingY movement,`which preslength of travel, including travel forwardly and l5 sure is automatically instantly released'and the j 4pressure head withdrawn' automatically when the predetermined travel has 'been completed. "ze" Y f Q I e DANIEL?. RFDVDING;V "201-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4116235 *Jun 20, 1977Sep 26, 1978Fuhr Arlan WChiropractic adjusting instrument
US4243025 *Apr 26, 1978Jan 6, 1981Life Chiropractic College, Inc.Cervical adjusting unit
US4461286 *Mar 15, 1982Jul 24, 1984Sweat Roy WChiropractic instrument
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Classifications
U.S. Classification606/238
International ClassificationA61H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61H1/008
European ClassificationA61H1/00P