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Publication numberUS2048450 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 21, 1936
Filing dateJan 23, 1934
Priority dateJan 24, 1933
Publication numberUS 2048450 A, US 2048450A, US-A-2048450, US2048450 A, US2048450A
InventorsHorn Heinz
Original AssigneeNorddeutsche Seekabelwerke Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stranded conductor
US 2048450 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 21, 1936.

H. HORN STRANDED CONDUCTOR Filed Jan. 23, 1934 Patented Jul 21, 1936 i i 2,048,450

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Application January 2:, 1034, Serial s... 707,964 In Germanylannary 24, 1933 china. (cl. ire-is) This invention relates 'to a method of manuinstance, be produced by making individual facture of stranded conductors of the -so-called wires, for instance all wires I of a thermo-plastic "re-entrant 7 type. A conductor of the "rematerial instead of making all the wires of metal entrant type". may bedeflned asa stranded conwhich is conducting. However, other methods I ductor in which each one of the wires of which of stranding are to be preferred, as will hereinit is composed changes its position in the cross after bereferred to. If a strandedconductor with section oi the conductor, in such a manner that thermo-plastic layers interposed therein accordit passes in a regular sequence from the centre ing to the invention is subjected to a drawing or of the cross section of the conductor to the outer rolling process and heat is simultaneously apperiphery, from which it returns again to the plied'thereto, the strands consisting of thermo- 10 centre. The individual wires are surrounded by plastic material will soften, and owing to the an insulatingoxide layer or a thin layer of lacgaps thereby produced, it will be possible to quer. Such stranded conductors have the advanimpart to the stranded conductor a higher filling tage that even when traversed by currents of factor withouta greater expenditure in'mechanill high'frequency the current density'jis uniform in ,cal energy.

all parts or the cross section of the conductor Instead of using two conductors with one and thelatter is therefore free from the skin strand of thermo-plastic material to form a effect which increases the resistance. Such constranded element of a higher order, as shown in ductors are thus suitable for the transmission of Figure 1, use is preferably made or a larger numcurrents of high frequency and may, for instance. berof .individual conductors, for instance five of 20 be emp oyed 8- h l t in cable! intended fol, six, which are stranded together around a core flfiquencmh I of the'rmo-plastic. material. However, other In the W W drawinsz modes of stranding a're possible in which a m 1 1111mm!!! one method 01 stranded' conductor according to the invention 5 conductors accordins o the invention is rendered suitable iorv rolling or drawing, by 2 m n v illustrates a second new inserting between the stranded elements thermo- .I'isur 3 fill-lamb & third m h Ind plastic profile strands whichare rendered plastic P181118 {111mm I mm under the action of heat and chan e the me- 111 68 1": 3 t in the ed m rigidity of the stranded conductor in w nefernngtorigurelthreesingleconducton m w 5 Md It has, for instance, been found that the evenm a i g able space can be especially well utilized by a strand of higher or er three 0 wh imag method of mama which lsimusmted turn the! ure 2. Three stranded elements .II are laid 8F be mm mm aroundacentral wire ll, each of which stranded 0 m tf 0 elements ii consists of a core of thermo-plastic m m: a Etr snded condugir 11:: 12d W J W bemm'edbm "mm sui fa ii l fiethod of stranding is illusmieetingthecompetely stranded conductor to-a 3 six profile strands." of 40 drawing or rolling process. Asaresult oithe m are laid around we m the we minimum mm was there are laid six further stranded elements, have tc g g g x g fi 1? d '3 u each of which consists of a core of thermo-piastic conductor and increases its cost of manufacture. 11, Round which 81! Individual w e 28 According to the invention, during h havebeen stranded. Thus the whole of the iscture of the stranded conductonroaie strands Med conductor r y o t ined mprises of a' thermoplastic material are inserted at suitthirty-seven conducting wires. able places between the individual'stranded ele- In order toproduce a conductor of more thane1 50 inents and are stranded therewith. The therev n wire three or six stranded e- 'moplastic material has to be 'sufllciently solid mente may be laid around a wntral wire, each .at ordinary temperature to withstand the meof which stranded elements consists of a strucchanicalstressesofthestranding. Astr'anded ture,snchasshowninFis 2or3. s5 conductor according to-the invention may, for The emnpietely stranded conductor is heated 5 and is drawn by rolling or application of pressure.

Figure 4 is a cross section through a stranded conductor according to Figure 3 after it has been subjected to a rolling process. The thermo-plastic material-has, as will be seen, filled up completelythe spaces between the conducting wires, thus serving at the same time as an insulation between the wires. If a stranded conductor built up as hereinbefore described, is used for deep sea submarine cables, the further advantage is attained that the thermo-plastic material serves at the same time as a pressure-equalizing means.

The profile strands used according to the present invention, may consist of any thermo-plastic insulating material used in the electrical art, for instance guttapercha, Paragutta", balata etc. Especially advantageous is polystyrol, since this material can be drawn into rigid strings or bands and in addition thereto, it possesses especially good electrical properties.

Further, mixtures of polystyrcl, with guttapercha, balata, Paragutta or the like, are used for the profile strands.

Instead of using thermo-plastic profile strands as hereinbefore described, according to a further modification of the invention, use is made of an intermediate layer of a soluble substance, so that instead of subjecting the stranded conductor to heat treatment, it can be treated by means of a solvent. For instance, it is possible to dissolve intermediate layers of guttapercha before the rolling or drawing process, by means of heme].

What I claim is: v

1. A method of manufacturing a high frequency stranded conductor of the type in which each strand is insulated from the next, and the strands change relative positions to minimize skin eiiect, consisting in inserting profile strands of an insulating thermoplastic material between the stranding elements of the stranded conductor and stranding them therewith, softening the said profile strands after the stranding and subjecting the stranded conductor to pressure in such a way that the profile strands are distributed between the stranding elements.

2. A method of manufacturing a high fre-' quency stranded conductor of the type in which each strand is insulated from the next, and the stranding them therewith, softening the said,

profile strands by heat after the stranding and subjecting the stranded conductor to pressure in such a way that the profile strands are distributed between the stranding elements.

3. A method of manufacturing a high frequency stranded conductor of the type in which I each strand is insulated from the next, and the strands change relative positions to minimize skin effect, consisting in inserting profile strands of an insulating soluble material between the stranding elements of the stranded conductor and stranding them therewith, softening the said profile strands by means of a solvent after the stranding and subjecting the stranded conductor to pressure in such a way that the profile strands are distributed between the stranding elements.

4. A method of manufacturing a high frequency stranded conductor of the type in which each strand is insulated from the next, and the strands change relative positions to minimize skin efiect, consisting in stranding around a central core a $0 plurality of strands, each comprising a core of thermoplastic material around which there is stranded a layer of conducting wires, softening all the said profile strands, after the stranding of the strands around the said central core, and subjecting the entire stranded conductor to prasure in such a way that the profile strands are distributed between the stranding elements.

5. A method of manufacturing a high frequency stranded conductor of the type in which each 39 strand is insulated from the next, and the strands change relative positions to minimize skin eifect, consisting in inserting profile strands of polystyrd! between the stranding elements of the stranded conductor and stranding them therewith, softening the said profile strands of polystyrol after the stranding, by heat, and subjecting the stranded conductor to pressure in such a way that the profile strands are distributed between the stranding elements.

6. A method of manufacturing a high frequency stranded conductor of the type in which each strand is insulated from the next, and the strands change relative positions to minimize skin efiect, consisting in inserting profile strands of polystyrol mixed with insulating thermoplastic material between the stranding elements and stranding them therewith, softening the said profile strands of polystyrol mixed with insulating thermoplastic material after the stranding, by heat, and subjecting the stranded conductor to pressure in such a way that the profile strands are distributed between the stranding elements.

HEINZ HORN. 6d

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2427507 *Apr 11, 1944Sep 16, 1947Carbide & Carbon Chem CorpMethod of producing sealed cables
US2438956 *Dec 24, 1942Apr 6, 1948Standard Telephones Cables LtdHigh-frequency cable
US2467857 *Aug 12, 1943Apr 19, 1949Gen ElectricAdjustable delay line
US2606650 *Apr 23, 1945Aug 12, 1952Evans Martin EContinuous wire drawing machine
US2708176 *Jun 14, 1951May 10, 1955Us Rubber CoCoaxial cable and method of making same
US2710557 *Nov 18, 1949Jun 14, 1955Sundt Engineering CompanyMusical instrument strings
US3131530 *Nov 18, 1960May 5, 1964Dietz AlfredWire ropes
US3291897 *Jan 10, 1964Dec 13, 1966Bramley AnthonyElectrically conducting rope
US4079192 *Jun 12, 1974Mar 14, 1978Bernard JosseConductor for reducing leakage at high frequencies
US4158946 *Jul 5, 1978Jun 26, 1979N. V. Bekaert S.A.Metal cord
US4301681 *Sep 6, 1979Nov 24, 1981Drexelbrook Controls, Inc.Method of using capacitor probe with a semiconductive electrode
US4677256 *Aug 19, 1985Jun 30, 1987Siemens AktiengesellschaftFlexible electrical control cable
US6091025 *Jul 29, 1998Jul 18, 2000Khamsin Technologies, LlcElectrically optimized hybird "last mile" telecommunications cable system
US6239379Nov 5, 1999May 29, 2001Khamsin Technologies LlcElectrically optimized hybrid “last mile” telecommunications cable system
US6241920Nov 5, 1999Jun 5, 2001Khamsin Technologies, LlcElectrically optimized hybrid “last mile” telecommunications cable system
US6684030Aug 25, 1999Jan 27, 2004Khamsin Technologies, LlcSuper-ring architecture and method to support high bandwidth digital “last mile” telecommunications systems for unlimited video addressability in hub/star local loop architectures
EP0119155A1 *Jan 30, 1984Sep 19, 1984Siemens AktiengesellschaftStranded conductor for flexible electrical cables and method of manufacturing it
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/47, 174/113.00R, 174/114.00R, 57/223
International ClassificationB61D29/00, H01B7/30, D07B1/16, H01B13/02
Cooperative ClassificationB61D29/00, H01B13/02, H01B7/30
European ClassificationB61D29/00, H01B7/30, H01B13/02