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Publication numberUS2048890 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 28, 1936
Filing dateSep 10, 1934
Priority dateSep 10, 1934
Publication numberUS 2048890 A, US 2048890A, US-A-2048890, US2048890 A, US2048890A
InventorsHector Rabezzana
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ignition system
US 2048890 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 28, 1936. RABEZZANA I 2,048,890

IGNITION SYSTEM Filed Sept; 10, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet l July 28, 1936 H. RABEZZANA IGNITION SYSTEM Filed Sept. 10, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet 1w Wafiezzmw I I Sll'oznoub Patented July 28, 1 936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE IGNITION SYSTEM Hector Rahezzana, Flint, Mich., assignor to General Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mich.,-a cor 'poration of Michigan Application September 10, 1934, Serial No. 143,357

' Claims.

breaker. The secondary of the transformer supplies energy to the plugs through the conventional distributor. In such systems it is common to operate the circuit breaker and distributor 15 from a common auxiliary shaft driven in any suitable manner from the crankshaft or auxiliary shafts, but at a speed equal to one-half that of the engine crankshaft. This reduction in speed requires the use of gearing or sprocket chains, and even with the best of constructions there is a certain amount of play or lash in the engagement of the teeth, or of the chain with the sprocket. This play is variable, depending on the fit and wear of the particular engaging parts, and, of course, increases with the use of the engine. This play I have found to seriously interfere with the performance of the engine and with the regularity of its firing. The reason for this is that it is the breaking of the current through the primary by operation of the circuit breaker that determines the time of sparking at the plug. If sparking does" not take place at the proper time in the engine cycle, loss of power and irregularity in firing results. I have found that this trouble may be avoided by mounting the circuit breaker directly on the engine crankshaft so that there is no opportunity for play to develop during the life of the engine. As a consequence firing always takes place at the same time in the cycle with the resultant substantial increase in efliciency and in smoothness of the engine.

While it is important that there be no lash in the drive for the circuit breaker, the performance of the engine is not affected by small amounts 5 of play in the distributor or its drive. Passage of current can take place between the distributor brush and contacts throughout a wide angular' range of movement of the brush without aifecting the time or character of ignition at the spark plug. I, therefore, found it desirable for convenience in design, assembly and repair to drive the distributor by flexible shafting in any suitable manner. This permits mounting of the distributor and coil at any convenient place about the engine. It is advantageous to locate the distributor close to the spark plugs, thereby permitting the use of a compact and simple wiring harness having a minimum of capacity losses. This arrangement also makes it easy to shield the wiring to prevent interference with radio transmission. 5

In the drawings: Figure 1 indicates diagrammatically the wiring diagram of a conventional high tension battery ignition system for a six cylinder engine, together with the manner of driving the circuit breaker 10 and distributor as disclosed in this application.

Figure 2 is a side view of an engine equipped with the improved system, together with a special arrangement of wiring harness.

Figure 3 is an end view of the engine of Fig- 15 ure 2.

Figure 4 is a partial sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a side view showing a modified form of mounting.

Figure 6 is an end view of the arrangement 0 Figure 5.

Figure '7 is a view of the top of an engine showing a further modification.

Figure 8 is a partial section through an engine equipped with the arrangement shown in Figure 7.

In Figure 1 B indicates the battery supplying current through circuit breaker C to primary P of the transformer or coil as it is commonly called. The breaker points are protected from sparking by condenser 8 shunted about them in accordance with usual practice. S indicates the secondary supplying current to the distributor D which, in turn, supplies energy to the spark plugs, one of which is shown at l0. l2 indicates the crankshaft of the engine which in case of a six cylinder engine is provided with a three lobed cam l4'that intermittently separates the contacts of the circuit breaker as shown. This action 40 takes place when the distributor arm I6 is in the position indicated in which it is substantially opposite one of the fixed contacts connected to a plug. The distributor arm 16 is indicateddiagrammatically as driven by flexible shaft l8 from shaft 20, driven by suitable reduction gearing from the crankshaft l2 at one-half engine speed.

With this ignition system the breaking of the primary circuit at the breaker causes a sudden demagnetization of the core of the transformer, producing a surge of high tension current in the secondary which causes a spark to pass at the plug to which the distributor directs energy. It is obvious that with this arrangement the breaking of the circuit by the circuit breaker occurs at the same time in the engine cycle throughout its entire life. Since the cam I4 is rigid with the shaft, there is no opportunity for lash to develop. Adjustment of the breaker points may be provided for as in conventional constructions.

It will be noted that the distributor is driven as usual at one-half crankshaft speed to care for the fact that in the conventional four-cycle en- 1 running along the side of the engine. 30 indicates conductors embedded in the housing extensions and runnings to clips or metallic sockets 32 adapted to connect with the central electrodes of the spark plugs, one of which is indicated diagrammatically at H] in Figure 3. i

As a convenient method of installation the housing 26-28 is shown as provided with integral extensions 34 pivoted to the engine on alined horizontal shafts as shown. With this arrangement the, housing 26-28 may be tilted away from the engine and thereby simultaneously disconnected from all of the plugs, the flexible shaft permitting such action.

An additional feature of this assembly consists in the mounting of the transformer in housing 36 which may also serve as the cover of the distributor.

In Figures 5 and 6 there is shown a slight modification in that the extensions 28' .of the dis tributor housing are mounted on studs 40 secured in the cylinder head. 'By removing the nuts 42 the ignition assembly may be disconnected from the plugs, the flexible shaft permitting it to be moved to a convenient position.

Figures 7 and 8 show a slight modification of Figures 5 and 6 in that the distributor housing 44 and its extensions 46 are made of metal, and is adapted to be secured to the top of the engine over the plugs II) by means of suitable studs and nuts 48 as commonly used in securing the valve covers to engine blocks. As indicated in Figure 8 the extensions 46 carry clips 50 suitably insulated from the housing, adapted to supply current to the plugs.

The flexible shaft used to drive the distributor may be driven from any suitable shaft olT'the engine, such as the cam shaft, generator shaft, or pump shaft. Obviously, also the distributor may be located at any convenient point on the engine, preferably near the spark plugs.

This improved system has proven especially advantageous in connection with dual ignition systems in which two spark plugs are supplied for each cylinder and a separate transformer and circuit breaker is employed for each set of plugs. The circuit breakers may be conveniently operated from the same cam on the crankshaft and the distributormay be provided with suitable contacts to simultaneously close the circuit to two spark plugs instead of one. A convenient design of distributor for this purpose is disclosed in the patent to Hartzell, 1,877,806, granted September 20, 1932.

I claim: r

1. In combination with an internal combustion engine comprising cylinders and pistons, a crankshaft to which the pistons are connected, and igniting devices in said cylinders, and an ignition system comprising a circuit breaker having the operating part thereof mounted on the crankshaft, and a distributor supplied with energy at times determined by operation of said circuit breaker, means for driving said distributor from the crankshaft at a different rate of speed, said distributor being provided with connections for successively supplying energy to said igniting devices.

2. In combination with a four cycle internal combustion engine comprising cylinders and pistons, a crankshaft to which the pistons are connected, and igniting devices in said cylinders, an ignition system comprising a circuit breaker having the operating part thereof mounted on the crankshaft, and a distributor supplied with energy at times determined by said circuit breaker, means for driving said "distributor from the crankshaft at one-half crankshaft speed, said distributor being provided with connections for supplying energy to said igniting devices. I

3.-The combination of a multicylinder four cycle internal combustionengine comprising the usual engine shaft, and an ignition system including a circuit controlling device mounted on the engine shaft and actuated thereby, said circuit controlling device determining the timing of-the sparks at the ignition devices in the cylinders, a distributor for directing sparking impulses to the ignition devices in. succession, and

- means for driving the distributor at twice engine speed.

4. The combination of a multicylinder internal combustion engine comprising the usual engine shaft, and an ignition system including a circuit controlling device mounted on the engine shaft and actuated thereby, said circuit controlling device determiningthe timing of the sparks at the ignition devices in the cylinders, a distributor for directing sparking impulses to the ignition devices in succession, said distributor being arranged adjacent the ignition devices to reduce capacity losses and shorten the leads to the ignition devices, and means for driving the distributor at a different rate of speed than the engine shaft.

5. The combination of a multicylinder internal combustion engine comprising the usual engine shaft, and an ignition system including a circuit controlling device mounted on the engine shaft and actuated thereby, said circuit controlling device determining the timing of the sparks at'the ignition devices in the cylinders, a distributor for directing sparking impulses to the ignition devices in succession, said distributor being arranged adjacent the ignition devices to reduce capacity losses and shorten the leads to arranged adjacent the ignition devices to reduce capacitylosses and shorten the leads to the ignition devices, and means including a flexible shaft for driving the distributor from the engine shaft.

7. The combination of a multioylinder four cycle internal combustion engine comprising the usual engine shaft, and an ignition system including a circuit controlling device mounted on the engine shaft and actuated thereby, said circuit controlling device determining the timing of the sparks at the ignition devices in the cylinders, a distributor for directing sparking impulses to the ignition devices in succession, said distributor being arranged adjacent the ignition devices to reduce capacity losses and shorten the leads to the ignition devices. means including a flexible shaft for driving the distributor from the engine shaft but at twice engine speed, and a spark coil mounted in proximity to the distributor.

8. In an internal combustion engine the combination of ignition devices, a distributor for distributing sparking impulses to the ignition devices, detachable means for supporting the distrlbutor adjacent the engine, and driving means for the distributor adapted to permit dismounting of the distributor while maintaining the parts in driving relation.

9. The combination of a multicylinder internal combustion engine comprising the usual engine shaft and ignition devices, a distributor for distributing sparking. impulses .to the ignition devices, detachable means for mounting the distributor on the engine, and means for driving the distributor from the engine shaft including flexible shaiting permitting the dismounting of the distributor from the engine while maintaining the parts in driving relation.

10. In an internal combustion engine the combination of ignition devices, and an ignition assembly comprising a distributor for distributing sparking impulses to the ignition devices and leads going from the distributor-to the ignition devices and having detachable engagement there- -with, detachable means for supporting the assembly adjacent the engine, and means for driving the distributor arranged to permit dismounting of the assembly while maintaining the parts in driving relation.

11. The combination of a-multicylinder internal combustion engine comprising the usualengine shaft and ignition devices, and an ignition assembly comprising adistributor for distributing sparking impulses to the ignition devices and leads extending from-the distributor and having detachable connection with the ignition devices, detachable means for suporting the assembly on the engine, and means for driving the distributor from the engine shaft including flexible shafting permitting the dismounting oi the assembly from the engine while maintaining the partsin driving relation. a

12. In an internal combustion engine the combination of ignition devices, and an ignition assembly comprising a distributor for distributing sparking impulses to the. ignition devices, a spark coil, and leads extending from the distributor and having detachable connection with the ignition devices, detachable means for supporting'the' assembly on the engine, and means for driving the distributorincluding flexible shatting permitting the dismounting of the assembly from the engine while maintainingthe parts in driving relation.

13. The combination of an internal combustion engine having ignition devices, leads having detachable connection with said ignition devices, and a unitary support for said leads pivoted to the engine.

14. The combination of an internal combustion engine having ignition devices, leads having detachable connection with said ignition devices, a unitary support for said leads pivoted to the engine, and a distributor carried by said support.

15.The combination of an internal combustion engine having ignition devices, a support pivoted to the engine adjacent said devices, said support carrying leads having detachable connection with said ignition devices, together with a distributor and spark coil.

HECTOR RABEZZANA.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION. Patent No. 2,048,890. July 28, 1936.

HECTOR RABEZZANA.

It is hereby certified that the. State of Incorporation of the assignee in the above numbered patent was erroneously given as "Michigan", whereas said State should have been given as Delaware, as shown by the reco d o assignments inthis office; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record ofthe case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 29th day of September, A. D. 1936.

Henry Van Arsdal'e Acting Commissioner-of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2488096 *Mar 21, 1947Nov 15, 1949Newman William ROne-piece plastic ignition harness for gasoline engines
US4756283 *May 4, 1987Jul 12, 1988General Motors CorporationIgnition lead arrangement
US5353758 *Jun 19, 1992Oct 11, 1994Sanshin Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaWiring arrangement for outboard motor
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/647, 123/195.00E, 123/146.50A, 123/143.00C
International ClassificationF02P7/02, F02P7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02P7/02
European ClassificationF02P7/02