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Publication numberUS2049284 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 28, 1936
Filing dateSep 7, 1933
Priority dateSep 7, 1933
Publication numberUS 2049284 A, US 2049284A, US-A-2049284, US2049284 A, US2049284A
InventorsWilliam T Anderson
Original AssigneeWilliam T Anderson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Football game
US 2049284 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

july 28, 1936. l w. T. ANDERSON 2,049,284

FOOTBALL GAME Filed Sept. '7, 1933 4 Sheets-Sheet l lNc=| r P G: fgrf'e e my PASS LINE PLAYS KICK FOR 60m..

FROM (0 LINE.

LIN E PLAYS ATTORNEY July 28, 1936. l W` T. ANDERSON 2,049,284

FOOTBALL GAME Filed Sept. 7, 1933 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 LINESMAN INVENTOR m11 iam Z'nderon BY A f; ATTORNEY July 2s, 1936. w T. ANDERSON 2,049,284

FOOTBALL GAME Filed Sept. 7, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 f i /53 Z9 "-59 Fig. 19 2 :s g\ Z 83 lNvENToR "A f Z5, m "25 William :Anderson 3Q m0 'Il 3 BY U r ,\%89 ,ml y u ,"1-.jfy. IMI/1A *Je 37 ATTORNEY July 2s, 1936. w T, ANDERSON 2,049,284

FOOTBALL GAME f Z8 Fig. Z5

INVENTOR William T nd/arson Patented July 2s, 193e 2,049,284

TATS ATET FFIQE FooTBALL GAME William T. Anderson, Montrose, Colo. Application september v, 1933, serial No. 688,493

11 claims. (o1. 273-144) This invention relates to games and more parwhich a young or an inexperienced player may ticularly to a football game for indoor use which develop a true football sense and judgment in is governed by the accepted rules for outdoor foothis selection of the proper play to make in meetball and which has both instructive and entering a given situation. 5 taining qualities. A further object is to provide a replica of the 5 Football has long been recognized as one of game of football as it is played by the larger teams the leading forms of outdoor sport and while of the nation by means of which instruction may entertaining indoor games have been produced be given as to the proper method of playing the previously embodying some features of the outgame on the actual outdoor eld. door game of football such games have very Another object is to provide a football game 10 largely lacked the capacity of imparting to the for indoor play that comprises aI wide variety of players a comprehensive knowledge of the game plays set forth on a small chart that sets forth as it is played outdoors, have lacked the great values of yardage gains that are made by a driving spirit and thrill of victory so vitally charteam playing'on the offense and yardage values acteristic of the outdoor game and have lacked that such gains made by the offense are repelled the spirit of sportmanship and chief attraction of by the defense which yardage values for both the outdoor game which characterizes the game offense and defense have been computed from a forming the present invention by permitting the large number of actual games played by college players to develop and to use their own ingenuity teams.

and to develop their own football sense thru Another object is to provide a football game 2Q acting as their own quarterback in selecting the for indoor use wherein charts for the team playbest possible play for a given situation in advancing on offense and for the team playing on deing the ball toward theopponents goal line. fense provide a plurality of plays in separate The present invention consists of an adaptaclassified form. y tion of the actual game of outdoor football based Another object is to provide an indoor football 25 on yardage values taken from a numberof actual game that has separate yardage charts for offense intercollegiate games collected according to classiand for defense, each of which may be used as a fied plays,weighted against a chance means that check on the other. v ,v

follows a graduated law of probability and em- Another object is to provide a football game bodied into separate charts for offense and for for indoor use that has playing charts that con- 30 defense and used in combination with repretain yardage values that vary in magnitude subsentative pieces and equipment associated with stantially inversely with a chance device that is the outdoor game. subject to a definitely graduated law of proba- An object of the present invention is to provide bility.

a game for indoor use which is as nearly as is A further object is to provide a football game 35 practically feasible a true replica of the game of for indoor use with which a large number of football as it is played out of doors. gar-nes may be played without any two games Another object is to provide a football game being alike. p that is to be played indoors and that is adapted Another object is to provide a game board for to'be played in accordance with and consistent the indoor playing of football. 40

with the same rules of football which control A further object is to provide an indoor footthe playing of the outdoor game. ball game board of improved form which is Another object is to provide a game which equipped with replicas of the usual trappings of embodies the spirit and thought which has elethe outdoor game of football.

vated the game of outdoor football to the rank Another object is to provide an improved form 45 of one `of the major sports. of mechanized game board for the indoor playing A further object lis to provide a game that is of football which may be used by a football coach adapted to be played indoors and that allows for the purpose ofV illustrating and explaining each player a wide latitude of both offense and to members of his team the strength and weak- 5() defense plays to simulate theV outdoor game and ness of a particular play for a particular situation 50 to choose from when playing on the offense as and also the succession of plays that is most tho that player playing on the offense were the nearly certain to lead his team to victory on the quarterback of his particular team. outdoor eld of play and to be used in com- Another object is to provide a substantial bination with a chart of plays. replica of the outdoor game of football thru 111th@ accompanying drawings which illustrate 55 teamY piece.V o Y The indoor game of football that embodies they a suitable embodiment of the present invention: Fig. 1 is a plan view ofthe preferred form of game board, and shows the team'piece and the linesman piece positioned on the eld of play;

Fig. 2 is an end View of the game board shown in Fig. 1, and shows the game board opened up for play in full lines, and in dotted outline, one

side ofthe game board folded over on the other f side of the game board about a flexible connect-v Fig. 9 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 9 9 of Fig. 8, looking in the direction Vindicated by the arrows; l

Fig. 10 is an'enlarged sectional View taken along the line I-IB'of Fig.r8';

Fig. 11 is a plan View of the score windows thru which the team scores are visible;

Fig. 12 is an enlarged sectional'view showing parts broken away and taken along the line IZ-VI 2 of Fig. 7; Y f v Y Fig. 13 is an enlarged planrview, of a key for operating'the locking mechanism shown in Fig. Y

Fig. 14 is a sectional view taken along the line lli-I4 of Fig. 12 and showstheY key shown in Fig. 13 in` position for insertion in the locking.

mechanism; Y

Fig. 15i's an enlarged sectional view taken along ythe line l5-l5 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 16 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line Iii-I6 of Fig. 7; f s

Fig 17 is a sectional view taken along the line l'l--I'I of Fig. 7; Fig. 18 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line |8-l8 of Fig. '7;V Y

Fig. 19 is a plan View in diminished scale of the mechanicalfgame board shown in Fig. '7

f Fig. 20 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 2li-20 of Fig. '7; Y

Fig; 21 is an enlargedsectional view taken along the line 2 l-2I of Fig. 7, with parts broken away; Fig. 221is an enlarged sectional view, with the dice tumbling mechanism omitted for purposes of clearness, taken along the line 22-22 of Fig. 19';

Fig. 23 is an enlarged sectional'view taken -along the line 23-23 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 24 is an enlargedv elevational view taken from the line 24-7-24'of Fig. 19;

Fig. 25 is a plan view showing a modied'positioning of thelinesman piece with respect to the present invention 'is preferably played onl the game board and with the trappings which are Vshown in Figs;l 1-6, inclusive, of the drawings,-

andwith two pairs of dice, such as those shown inria?,Y Y

The preferred form of game board is made of cardboard,` plywood, or theV like, and consists of two substantially rectangular sidesA IY and V2, which are joined' along adjacent lateral edges by anilexible hinge 3. VWhen theV game boardis closed the sides l and 2 substantially overlie eachother, as

shown in opened position in full'lines and in closed position by side 2 being shown in dotted outline'in:V

Fig. 2. Y Y A field of play l is preferably positioned on the. left hand side of theY game'board and is dimensioned and marked substantially VproportionateV with an outdoor football field. Side lines 5 and S and goal lines i and 8 bound the field of play. A plurality of 5 yd. lines, of whichflines 9 and l0, may be taken as illustrations,fare positioned be. tween and are substantially parallel to,V the goal lines 'i and 8. The 5 yd. lines are preferably numbered along the sidev lines'as shown, in order to facilitate the locating of any given position on the eld of play. Pairs of goal posts ll and l2 Y are positioned at opposite ends ofthe field Vof play and are preferably of. contrasting colors, as

red for one pairY of goal posts .and green for the'V secutive numerical order around its center where.,

a pin l@ supports a'freely rotatable hand l 5.

A linesman piece i6, such as that shown in Fig. 5, is provided for use on the field of play for indicating the particular ten yards which are to'be made in any one set of four downs and also for establishing positions between the five yard lines ,3

on the field of play.. The linesmanpiece I6 has ameasuring edge il' which is graduated by lines into one yard spaces. An upwardly turned thumb Y grip i8 is provided for handling the piece and Vpositioning it on the eld of play.

A freely movable team piece I9, as shown in Fig. Bof ,the drawings, is providedV for use on the f field ofplay for indicating the position of oppose ing teams.V The team Vpiece I9, preferably carries illustrations of opposing teams 2E and 2|, drawn K up in scrimmage play on either side of a middle line22,.wl1ich is used as an index for locating'the ,Y

position of the piece on the field of play. The illustrations of the team Vmembers are preferably colored to correspond with the colors of their respective pairs of goal posts, and may or may not bearletters to signify their respective positions on the teams, as desired. Y Vl Y f Preferably four dice are used in pairsV for the purposeof introducing the element of chancein ,I o

the game. The dice 23 and 25., which are shown in Fig. 7, may be taken as illustrative and areV preferably colored in pairs to conform Ywiththe colors of the ,respective vpairs of goal posts..V Y

Other forms of numerical chance controlled de-Y vices which are adapted tofollow a definitely graduated law of probability, Vmay be vsubstituted for the pairs of dice, if desired.

.The right handside of the gameboard'prefer-gY ably carries duplicate charts of Yplay 25 and rules4 26, which are easily readable from opposite. ends` of the gameboard.V The dice readingsare used in'conjunction with the chart' of plays to indicate the degree of success or'failureof a particular play. 1 Y Y rIhe law of probability which is. followed Yby two dice freely thrown, provides twenty one pos-V sible scores` or numberV combinations, omitting'v cur. Y The graduations of the law of probability duplicates, and `thirty six total chances inA which 'any oneof suchY numben combinationsY may oc'- which is characteristic of two dice freely thrown will be apparent from the following table:

Out of thirty six total .chances there are respectively:

1 2 3 4 5 6 5 4 3 2 1 chances that the readings will be2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 l1 12, onthe dice.

In compliance with this law of probability, there are six times the probabilitythat the number 7 will be thrown that there is that either the number 2 or 12 will be thrown; the same chance that a will be thrown that there is that a 9 will be thrown; etc. The yardage values appearing in the chart of plays are means of classified plays in actual games weighted against this law of probability.

The chart of plays is divided into a chart for the use of the team playing on the offense and having possession of the ball .and entitled Offensive, and a chart for the use of the team playing on the defense and not having possession of the ball and entitled Defensive, The purpose of this division is vto distinguish between the yardages gainedV and lost by the opposing teams.

The yardage values listed in the chart of plays for both the offense and for the defense are based on the charting of a large number of classified plays from actual outdoor games balanced against the graduated law of probability followed by a pair of dice, as described above. Relative values of each play thru the line, passes, kicks, etc., were studied from observation of the actual outdoor game and have been adapted to the present indoor game in order to make the Values set forth in the chart as near as possible to the'actual values for corresponding plays in the outdoor game of football. The chart presents the average yardages which have been gained or lost thru the various plays made in the actual outdoor games which have been charted, weighted against the frequence of the occurrence` of a given reading on a pair of dice freely thrown.

The chart of plays gives eighty eight variations of play thru each of seven line positions, or six hundred and sixteen variations of line plays on a simple chart of eleven chances. Combination plays may also be made, if desired, such as a run around end accompanied by a lateral pass, by shaking the dice separately for the yardage made oneach play both by the team playing on the offense and by the team playing on the defense.

In both the chart for the offense and that for the defense, it will be noted in general for all columns, except that for the offense kick-olf column and the defense line play values for dice rows 2, II and I2, that the yardage values for plays tend to be smaller with increase in probability, that is, the yardage values nearer the dice readings of '7 are smaller than the yardage values nearer the dice readings of 2 or 12.

In the offense column headed Kickoff or Punt, the most probable distance kicked, listed in dice row 1, is the average kick of forty five yards. This distance is taken as the base or most frequently occurring distance for the kick-off. A rarely occuring short kick, such as a kick of fifteen yards is positioned on the dice row 2. A rarely occurring long kick, such as a kick of seventy-five yards is placed on the dice row I2 The yardage graduations decrease more or less consistently from the mean value of forty ve Vyards in one direction and increase in the other direction, to the ends of the column.

The defense line play values for dice rows 2, I I,

and 12 are exceptions to the general rule because of the necessity of -balancing these particular plays against the penalties and fumbles shown on the offense side of the chart for the same dice readings. This is in rough conformity with the actual outdoor football games charted and prevents the present indoor game from being a free scoring affair.

The yardage values for the offense side of the chart are in general somewhat larger than the yardage values for the defense side of the chart. This provision is also in conformity with the actual outdoor games charted and provides for a more or less consistent gain for the team playing on the offense. A fumble and recovery is charted to occur once in thirty six chances, which roughly approaches the actual occurrence of this play in the actual outdoor game and for the same reason penalties are charted to occur three times in thirty six chances.

Forward passes were, in the games charted, usually incompleted, as set forth in the chart for the defense. Successful forward passes were found to be somewhat better ground gainers than lateral or backward passes. As shown under the heading Symbols in Fig. 3, INT signifies intercepted play and INC signifies an incomplete play. An interception of the ball transfers the possession of the ball to the intercepting team. An incompleted pass indicates no yardage gain but retention of the ball by the passing team.

Plays thru various parts of the line are given different values in conformity with the actual outdoor game. Plays thru center are usually certain of a small gain but a gain that is not sufficient to consistently make a ten yard gain in four tries. Plays olf tackle, when successful, are better ground gainers than plays thru center but they are somewhat more hazardous. End runs, when successful, give substantial gains, but when unsuccessful frequently cause losses of from five to fifteen yards.

The preferred procedure by means of which the values of the various line plays for both the team playing on the offense and for the team playing on the defense are adapted to the graduated law of probability of a pair of dice is that the products of dice readings times yardage for the separate dice rows are separately totaled for each column, these totals are divided by the number of dice readings for that column and the differences between the averages for the same play for the offense and for the defense so obtained are maintained in a graduated order, as:

Ends: av. dit?. av. diff.

left O 306 38 17 right O 296 37 17 D 235 2l D 219 20 Tackle:

left O 263 33 13 right O 256 32 13 D 222 20 D 210 19 Guard:

left O 140 17 10 right O 142 18 10 D 81 7 D 87 8 Center:

left O 126 16 8 D 86 8 The preferred differences are: center `play 8, guard l0, tackle 13, and end 17.

It will be noted in the preferred differences that center is taken as a base to which 2 are added for guard plays, 3 for tackle, and 4 for end plays.

In kicks for goal, as shown in Fig. 3, under the heading Symbols, the letter S is used to signify a successful kick and the letter X to signify an unsuccessful kick. Where a kick is blocked no yardage is gained and possession of the ball passes to theblocking team `when the kick is blockedV on the fourth down; When the kick is blocked on downs one to three,` inclusive, the

' players roll their dice and the team securing the higher dicereading is theteam whichrrecovers the ball. Kicks for goal' are less likely to be successful vwhen they are made Vfrom positions a greater -distance away from the goal posts and playing on the offense.

5. Player for Y'the team holding the chart for'the offense is so graduated.

Therules of playdirect the players in the useV ofY the game board and the'game pieces and cone sist of a brief rsumV of the following rules. The rulesV of Vplay may 'appear on the game board' or on a separate sheetof paper, as desired.

Rules of play The game lasts one hour and is divided into four fifteen minute quarters. Y

The team playing on the offense is the team possessing the ball. Y

Spaldings Official Football Rules for the current year is to be followed thruout.

l.v Players roll dice, higher number takes kickoff and choice of goals, and opens play as team Y' 2; Player onV oense'places team piece on 'his 40 yd. line, calls kick-off, rolls his dice, and con# sults chart headed Offensive for yardage his `team kicks ball into defense territory.

3. Player 'on defense rolls'his dice, and consults the chart headed Defensive for the yardage his team 'returns the ball received Von the'kick-oif.

4. Player for the team holding the ball'places Y dice, and consults the chart headedV Offensive under the rcolumn headed bythe play that he has selected and in the row that is indicated by his dice throw and'notes the yardage indicated.

5. Player on the defense rolls his dice, consults the chart headed Defensive in the column'of the play called by the player onvthe offense and in the row indicated by the Ydice throw ofv the defense player, deducts his 'yardage from the o ffense yardage, moves the team Vpiece the yardage so determined, and moves the downs indicator to read two.. Y Y

7..'Ihe play continues to four downs. If the Y team possessin'gthe ball has made or exceeded the ten yards indicated by the yardsman piece before the end. of the fourth down, the position fof the yardsrnan piece is changed to lindicate theV next f tenyards gain that teamV must make inthe next rsi Y four downs to retain possession of the ball, and

that team continues as oense player. Should .any ten yard gain not be made in four downs by the team playing onthe offense, the possession of the ball goes to the opposing team which thereby beccmes the team playing on the offense. Y y V8. Sceres: touchdown-6 pointsteam piece crosses the defense goal line; try-forpoint after `tofigli-downl pointvwhere successful; field goal- 3 points-team piece crosses the defense goal line on a successful kick; and safety-2 points for opponents-'tearnpiece crosses vthe offense goal line.

9.V Specific plays: f VA kick-off follows each score made-the team having beenvscored on has the option'offkicking or receiving.` '1 i Y VPenalty-occurs whenA the offense calls aline play and then rolls 2 Yor 11 with his dice. Both players `then roll their respective dice andi-the 5 penalty is suffered by the team' rolling the'lower number. f. i, ...Yy 7 Y Fumble-occurs when the offense calls a line` playrand rolls 11 with his dice. vBoth players then rolltheir respective diceV and the player rolling 10V the higher number recovers the fumble and there-y b-y gains possession of the balland becomes the team playing on the offense;

Intercepted passe-.the yardage'that defense iny ercepts'and returns a pass made by the oense 1'5" `VV is deducted from thelisted yardage that offense advances the ball.

Incomplete. pass-,wlreretheV defense chart in-` Y Vdicates. anv incomplete pass the offense, retains possession of the ball but fails to gain theV yard- 20'.-

age or goal indicated on the offense chart. 'Y

Blocked kick--kickV fails and possession of thek ball goes to the defenseV team on'the fourth down. When a Ykick is blocked on downs one'to zthree,

having the higher dice :reading is the team which recovers' the ball. f Y

`Unsuccessful kickfor field .goal-f-defense does not roll dice since kick failed, rthe offensemakes no yardage gain andthe possession of theball 30V` vgoes to the defense tearnon their 2O yd. line.

AA modified Yform of game board of thejmechanizedtype-for use in the' playing ofthe game of` indoor football which vis Vdisclosed herein, is shown in Figs.725,'inclusive, of the-drawings.

The mechanized game board is preferably sup- Y ported by a 4plurality of leg's,of Vwhich the leg 21, shown in Fig. 22, may be taken as representativaY andV comprises a bottom 28, "which issecured to four side walls such as thes'ide wall'279, Vby screwsY o 30, asyshown in Fig. V18, andiatop'lcomprising Van outer framei3l, in which a glass plate 32, is

mounted by'rquarter round.r strips 33,`andto the under sideof which frameafield carrying plate 34, which is' formed o'f-thin plywood or sheet 45 metal, is secured by Vbolts 35.V

Y The top of the mechanized form of game board is preferably connected to one sidewall by a Y pluralityof hinges` such as hingesS-v and 3l,V

forthe purpose of permitting accessito thefin- 50 Vterior of the game board. Y Alck 38, as shown in Y' 'Y Fig. 24, may be provided,rif desired, Vfor locking thetop-down. n Y Y A field of 'play 39, shownin Fig, V19,Y which sub# Y stantially duplica'tes'the previously described field 55' of' playll, isdepicted on the; field Vcarrying plateV g y341. Slots 4B and 6l, shown in Fig; 2, are formed longitudinally ofthe field of playrthru the plate 34, for the accommodation respectively; of Aa teamY Y inclusive, the players roll their dice Vand the team 25;

piece AZfand-a Vlinesma'n piecel3,'both`V of which are designed to be freely slidable along their respective grooves..V .FI'he-slot '30j preferably extends longitudinally of the .middle of theeld of play andA theslot'lil alongthe sideline as shown.V

As in the previously'describedffield of play 4, 65

Y pairs of distinctively colored goalposts i4 and' 45, as shown in Fig. 19,'are positioned at opposite Y ends of the field of play. Y Y Y The team piece d2 preferably bears insignia of` opposing .teams as appearing on the team` piece 9,and Vis secured; toanunde'rly'ing portion Q6, as'shown in Fig's. 15,'and i6, bybolts M andll8.V

Y The underlyingl portion i6 ispreferably threaded on its lower side for engagement with the spirally threadedV shaft JSS,Y the opposite "ends of. which are journaled in the .bearing pieces 5B and 15|.

Hand, wheels 52 and 53, shownin Figs. 7 and 19, which are rigidly secur'ed tc opposite ends of the shaft 49, have peripheral portions which project thru slots formed in the frame 3l for access from above the game board altho access to the hand wheels may be provided in some other manner, if

desired. l A line 54, as shown in Fig.r23, of color Y to contrast with the color of the hand wheelsmay be formed transversely of the periphery thereof,

fif desired, at spaced intervals which conform to the movement of the team piece a given distance, such as one yard, on the field of play.

`The linesman piece 43 has a surface portion which is proportionate to ten yards in length on the scale of the field of play 39 and the surface of the linesrnan piece 43 is graduated in one yard lengths, as shown. The linesman piece is geared to Va spirally threaded shaft 55' in the same manner as is shown in Figs. 15 and 16 for the team piece 42. The ends of the shaft 55 are journaled in the bearing pieces 59 and 5|, and hand wheels 56 and 51 are rigidly secured thereto for operation of the shaft 55. The hand wheels 56 and 51 have peripheral portions which extend thru suita- .ble apertures formed in the frame 3| for prodesired.

A chart of plays 25 and rules 26 are positioned on the field carrying plate 34 beside the eld of play 39 and on either end of the game board, as shown in Fig. 19, in such a manner as to be @-easily readable from either end of the game board.

A clock 58 is mounted in the frame 3|, as shown in Figs. 8 and 19, and serves to indicate the periods of play. The dial 59 of the clock, is preferably divided into quadrants of fifteen minutes each altho, if desired, the time periods of play may be of other duration. In its preferred construction the glass 68 of the clock 58 is apertured at its center for the accommodation of a short shaft 6| on the upper end of which a hand knob 62 is rigidly secured. An internally milled, frusto-conical aperture 83 is formed in the lower end of the shaft 8|. The upper end of the clock shaft 64, which is rotated by the clock mechanism, is also milled and of frusto-conical shape and designed for seating within Vthe aperture 63 formed in the shaft 6|. The clock hand 65 is rigidly mounted on the shaft 6|. Free access to the hand knob 62 makes it possible to lift the clock hand 65 from any position and to place it at Zero on the clock dial 59 at the beginning of any-game.

. A sound mechanism, associated with the clock 5,8, is preferably provided for announcing the end of each quarter and the end of the game. The preferred form of such sound mechanism is the bell 6B which is mounted on the under side of the clock dial 59 by means of the rivet 61 and is sounded bythe impact of the small weight 68 which is carried at the lower end of the trip 69. The trip 69 is pivoted on the pin 19, the ends of which seat in suitable bearing indentations formed in the dial 59 which is apertured for the reception of the trip 69. The upper end of the trip 69 is preferably inclined and is of sufficient length for making engagement with the clock hand 65. The trip and bell arrangement is preferably duplicated at ea-ch quadrant of the clock dial, as shown in Fig. 8 of the drawings.

A pair of downs indicator drums 'H and 12,

shown in Figs. 7 and 22 ofthe drawings, carry numerals 1 to 4, inclusive, on their peripheries, which numerals are consecutively visible thru suitable windows 13 and 14 formed thru the frame 3|. The downs indicator drums 1'| and 12 are rigidly mounted on a shaft 15 which is journaled adjacent either end in the bearings 16 and 11. Hand wheels 18 and 19 are rigidly mounted on the ends of the shaft 15 and a portion of the peripheries of the hand wheels 18 and 19 preferably project thru suitable apertures in the frame 3|.

A pair of score Wheels 80 and 8|, shown in Figs. '7 and 17, are positioned beneath and are substantially parallel to the eld carrying plate 34, and are toothed along their peripheries. Each score wheel carries score numerals positioned inwardly of its periphery and readable thru suitably positioned windows 82 and 83 which are cut thru the eld carrying plate 34. The score numerals are preferably colored to conform with the goal posts and with the teams to which the score applies. Each score wheel is mounted in freely rotative relation about a bolt 84 which is positioned at the center of the wheel. A bearing 85, thru which the bolt 84 passes, serves to support the score wheel during its rotation in a substantially single plane. The bolt 84 and the bearing 85 are mounted in a block 86 which is rigidly secured to the bottom 28 of the game board.

Each score Wheel is driven by a peripherally toothed gear 81, the teeth of which engage the peripheral teeth of the score wheel. The gear 81 is rigidly mounted on a shaft 88 which is journaled thru the frame 3| and is operated by a hand knob 89 which is rigidly mounted on the upper end of the shaft 88.

Dice tumblers 90 and 9|, shown in Figs. 7, 20 and 21, are provided for tossing the dice 23 and 24 in pairs. The dice preferably conform in color to the color of the pair of goal posts and the team with which they are used. Windows 92 and 93 are formed in the frame 3| for the observation of the dice from above the game board. The dice tumbler construction is substantially duplicated but inverted and the description of one will apply to both.

Each dice tumbler has a at bottom portion 94 and substantially cylindrical side portions in which a plurality of inwardly pressed ribs, such as the ribs 95 and 96,` are formed for catching the edges of the dice during the rotation of the tumbler. Each dice tumbler is enclosed in a shell 91 which has a substantially cylindrical bottom portion and upstanding side portions and is rigidly mounted against movement between the bearings98 and 99 in which shafts |00 and |0|, which are rigidly secured to opposite ends of the dice tumbler 90, are journaled. The shell 91 prevents loss of the' dice during the rotation of the dice tumbler. A small gear |02' is rigidly secured to one end of ther shaft and engages the teeth of a peripherally toothed large gear |03 beside the hand Wheel |05, both of which are rigidly mountedon the shaft |04. A portion of the periphery of the hand wheel projects thru a suitable aperture formed in the frame 3| for access thereto fromabove the game board. The shaft |04 is journaled in the bearings 98 and 99.

The team piece 42 and the linesman piece 43 may be locked-against operation, if desired, as when the game is not in use or when used in conjunction with a coin release, by the form of drawings. Y 4. fThe key |06, shown in Figs. 13 and 14 of the drawings, forms a suitable means of operating the lock shown. A key hole |01 for'the reception of the key |06, is formed. in thepivoted center bar |08 of thel lock.l The center bar |08 kis pivotally mounted on the'bearing piece 50 by the headed pin |09, and the ends of thecenter bar |08 are pivotally secured to the thrust bars |||iV and I|| by the pins ||2.and ||3. VDepressions I iliand ||5, which are formed in the thrust bar and concentric with'thehand wheels 52 and 56 Yin the side of the bearingl piece 50.

in Vthrustby the'. spring III.. The spring ||'I is positioned around therod I6 within the housing H8. countersunk within .the bearing piece 50 and secured thereto bysuitable meansas'by spot welding.' The thrust bars-.H0 andare held against the side of the bearing piece k by the headed pins ||9 and |20, respectively, which form freely sliding engagement .within'the undercut grooves |2|.V and |22, respectively, formed YEnd teeth |23 and |24 on the A,thrust barv |10, and teeth |25 and |26 on the thrust bar |I|, are adapted for engagement with the peripheral teeth on the gears |2'I and |28 which .are rigidly mounted on the shafts 49 and 55'r'espectively, adjacentto respectively. The absence of substantial incline on thecontacting facesof the engagingteeth of the thrust bars and the gears, prevents the 'release of the locking mechanism when in secured position by the use of the hand wheels 52 and 55. A similar-locking mechanism-may be mounted'on the hand WheelsV 53 and 51, at the opposite sideof the gamezboardyif desired. The locking mechanism may also beadapted for use in a coin operated gameboard if desired.

..A,modied positioning of the linesman piece 43,'with respect to the team piece'liZ, is shown in Fig. 25.- -The linesmanpiece 43 is positioned subbodiment of theinventionV that is shown and rde-V yscribed herein is presented .for purposes of illus-rv tration and explanation` and that'variousmodivi'lcations in the. game, in the: game boardY on which' the game is played, in fthe piecesused in the game, and in the` meansior introducing thev element of -chance in the game, may be made without departing 'from the .invention Yas dened in the appendedv claims. Y

, What I claim is:

1. A game board, comprising-a shell rigidly mounted therein, a substantially semi-cylindrical bottom portion of said shell Vfor retainingarticles that may be loosely positioned therein, a continuously Vrevolvable tumbler rotatably mounted in said shell, tumbler rotating means having an operating part lextending,tofth'e -exterior of said gam-e board, anda substantially cylindrical side portion ofY said tumbler Vol? transvers'epcurvature .substantially concentric withV the vtransverse noit said shell into? said tumbler -onthe rotation The housingv ||8 is preferably partially lock which islsliown' in Figs; .7, 12an'd'14` oi the' Vthereof and simultaneously imparting a Vspin-` tumbler, a hand wheel for manually operating said dice tumbler rotating means and having a portion projecting outwardly oi' said game board, a gear train interposed between said hand wheel and said'dice tumbler rotating means, a 'substan-Y tially semi-cylindrical portion of said diceY tum- Y bler coaxial with said semi-cylindrical portion of said Yshell for imparting a spinning' Ymotion to and for loosely retaining dice that may be remov- 15Y ably positioned'therein, a plurality VVof* dice enfA gaging ribs disposed infsaid cylindrical portion of saidV dice tumbler and Yserving to impart mo-` tion to said dice both rotatably with the motion of said dice tumbler and longitudinally thereof,.20

k tatable and continuously revolvable dice tumblerY positioned within said gam-e board and visiblethru said window, a dice engaging rib projecting upwardly from the surface of'said diceV tumbler and serving to impart both rotating spinning motion and motion longitudinally of said dice tum- I bler to articles freely positioned therein, a shaft towhichY said dice tumbler is rigidly joined,'andV continuously rotatable shaft operating means accessible from WithoutY said game board.

4. A game board, comprising `a transparent- Window, a continuously rotatable dice tumbler disposed inwardly of said game board and visible Y thru said window and having an edge portion for imparting a spinning motion to dice impacted thereby, av dice engaging ribA projecting 'upwardly from thesurface of aportion of said dice Vtumbler' and adapted for imparting spinning motion to solid articles loosely disposed Ywithin said dice tumbler both rotatably with thermotionof said dice tumbler and longitudinally thereof, a shell disposed outwardly of said dice tumbler and in rigid relationv with said game board, and dice 50 tumbler continuously operating means accessible from without said game board.

5V, A game board, comprising a window, a continuously rotatable dice tumbler visible'thru said. window, a substantially cylindricalside portion 55 of said dice tumbler Vhaving aV dice engaging edge portion that imparts a spinning motion to Vdice impacted thereby, a substantially at dice dis-, playing bottom portion of said dice tumbler, a

shell disposed outwardly of said diceftumbler in co-aXial relation Ywith said side portion thereof and in rigid relation With said game board, and

' dice tumbler operating means accessible from without said game board.

H 6. A game board, comprising a vframe"poition i and a bottom portion, a windowrpositioned in said frame portion, 'a bearing interposed between said game board frame portion and said game board bottom portion in rigid relation tllerewith,V a shell having asubstantally semi-cylindrical lower por- V tion positioned beneathV said window, in rigid relation with said game boardrfiame portion, a device tumbler rotatably positioned within said shell and having sideV portions that are substane Y tially co-axial with said semi-Cylindrical lower gV portion of said shell, a dice tumbler edge portion adapted for impacting dice and imparting a spinning motion thereto, a plurality of dice engaging ribs projecting upwardly from a portion of said `dice tumbler and adapted for imparting a spinning motion to dice loosely positioned within said dice tumbler both rotatably and longitudinally thereof, and means accessible from outside of said game board for continuously rotating said dice tumbler.

7. A game board, comprising a window, a rotatable dice tumbler having a portion that is visible thru said window, a side portion of said dice tumbler of curved section and terminating in an edge portion that is adapted for imparting a spinning motion to dice impacted thereby, a substantially dat bottom portion of said dice tumbler and continuing from said dice tumbler side portion, a rib projecting upwardly from a vportion of said dice tumbler side portion for imparting a spinning motion to dice impacted thereby both rotatably with said dice tumbler and longitudinally thereof, a shell mounted in rigid relation with said game board and disposed outwardly of said dice tumbler and having a portion substantially co-axial therewith, a substantially cylindrical bottom portion of said shell adapted for retaining articles that may be loosely disposed therein, an upstanding side wall portion of said shell continuing from said shell bottom portion and forming a part thereof, and dice tumbler continuously rotatable operating means accessible from without said game board.

8. A game board. comprising a window, a continuously rotatable dice tumbler visible thru said window and having a side wall of curved section. a dice engaging edge portion of said dice tumbler that .imparts a spinning motion 'm dice. irnnanted thereby, a shell disposed outwardly of said dice tumbler and mounted rigidly with respect to said game board and having a substantially semi-cylindrical lower portion that is substantially coaxial with said side wall of said dice tumbler, a shaft for operating said dice tumbler, bearing means mounted rigidly with respect to said game board and in which said shaft is journalled, and a hand wheel adapted for continuously operating said shaft and having a portion accessible from without said game board.

9. A game board, comprising a window, a continuously rotatable dice tumbler visible thru said window and having a side Wall of curved section, a dice engaging edge portion of said dice tumbler side wall that imparts a spinning motion to dice impacted thereby, a shell disposed outwardly of said dic-e tumbler and mounted rigidly with respect to said game board and having a substantially semi-cylindrical lower portion that is substantially co-axial with the curved side wall oi said dice tumbler, a shaft for operating said dice tumbler, bearing means mounted rigidly with respect to said game board and in which said shaft is journalled, a hand wheel adapted for continuously operating said shaft and having a peripheral surface accessible from Without said game board, and indicia disposed along the peripheral surface of said hand Wheel.

10. A dice tumbling device, comprising a dice tumbler housing shell having a semi-cylindrical lower portion for retaining dice positioned therein, a dice tumbler disposed within said shell and having a side portion of curved section that is substantially co-axial with said lower portion of said shell, a dice impacting edge portion or" said dice tumbler side portion for imparting a spinning motion to dice forceably contacted thereby, and means for continuously rotating said dice tumbler Within said shell.

11. A game board, comprising a window, a rotatable continuously revolvable dice tumbler positioned within said game board and visible thru said window, a curved side wall forming a part of said dice tumbler, a shell enclosing said dice tumbler and having a substantially s-emi-cylindrical lower portion with which said dice tumbler curved side wall is substantially concentric, a dice engaging rib projecting upwardly from the surface of said dice tumbler curved side wall and extending substantially diagonally thereof and Vadapted for imparting a spinning motion to solid articles loosely positioned within said dice tumbler both rotatably with the motion of said dice tumbler and longitudinally thereof, a shaft rigidly joined with said dice tumbler, a bearing thru which said shaft is journalled, and continuously rotatable shaft operating means accessible from without said game board.

WILLIAM T. ANDERSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3730528 *Feb 16, 1971May 1, 1973H CorradoFootball board game apparatus
US3947039 *Sep 18, 1974Mar 30, 1976Sadler John WFootball board game apparatus
US4094509 *Feb 9, 1977Jun 13, 1978The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc.Football game
US4117606 *Jul 22, 1977Oct 3, 1978Pundt Richard AMethod and means of sequentially observing player positions in predetermined game plays
US4660836 *Jun 14, 1985Apr 28, 1987Jerry RhomeQuarterback game
US5046743 *Aug 21, 1990Sep 10, 1991John SalernoStrategy-type soccer board game
US5076588 *Aug 6, 1990Dec 31, 1991Minh Do LCard game based on decision theory
US5405141 *Nov 15, 1993Apr 11, 1995Wilkes; John M.Football board game apparatus and method of play
US20050062232 *Sep 17, 2004Mar 24, 2005Eric PavlikSystem and method for simulating a game of football
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/144.00R, 273/247
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00041
European ClassificationA63F3/00A4D