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Publication numberUS2050309 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 11, 1936
Filing dateJun 24, 1935
Priority dateJun 24, 1935
Publication numberUS 2050309 A, US 2050309A, US-A-2050309, US2050309 A, US2050309A
InventorsGensburg Louis W
Original AssigneeGensburg Louis W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus
US 2050309 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 11, 1936. 1.. WQGENSBURG GAME APPARATUS Filed June 24, 1935 s Sheets-Sheet 1 Jim .17 mx 1?. 4. INVENTOR. 93 8A v [was WGensfiU Jy.

M6 ATTORNEY.

Aug. 11, 1936. 1.. w. GENSBURG GAME APPARATUS 5 She'ets-Sheet 2 Filed June 24, 1955 INVENTOR. W Gensbuz H/SATI'ORNEY- Aug. 11, 1936. w, GIENSBURZG v 2,050,309

GAME APPARATUS Filed June 24, 1935 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. Lauzs Wlierzsb n 9 0 ///5 ATTORNEY.

Patented Aug. 11, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT FOFFICE 2,050,309 GAME APPARATUS LouisW. Gensburg, Chicago, Ill. Application June 24, 1935, Serial No, 28,133

3 Claims. (01.273-121) I This invention relates to a game apparatus. It is an object of this invention to provide an improved game apparatus, which is relatively simple and inexpensive in construction, and eflicient in use. Anotherobject of the present invention is to provide a novel baseball game of the so-called pin and marble game type. i

A further object of the present invention is to provide a novel mechanism for advancing the balls from one base to another upon the diamond.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

The invention consists in the novel combination and arrangement of parts to be hereinafter described and claimed.

The invention will be understood best by reference to the accompanying drawings, showing the preferred form of construction and in which:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of a game apparatus embodying a preferred'form of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the baseball diamond, the approach runways to the diamond, and certain parts of the operating mechanism for advancing the balls from one base to another upon the diamond;

Fig. 3 is a sectional detail view, on line 3-3 in Fig. 2, showing one of the ball-stopping and advancing units which are associated with first, 90 second, and third bases of the diamond;

Fig. 4 is a sectional detail view, showing one of the switches, arranged at first, second, and third bases, for indicating the fact that balls are positioned upon the bases and the respective bases at which the balls are located;

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view on line 5-5 in Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 is a bottom plan view on line 6-6 in Fig. 5; a

40 Fig. '7 is a sectional view on line 1--'l in Fig. 6; Fig. 8 is a perspective detail view, partly in section, of one feature of the invention and which feature is associated with the ball-elevating device;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view of part of the playing field or diamond, showing certain parts of the operating mechanism associated therewith; I v

Fig. 10 is a sectional view in detail, showing one 50 of the switches which are locatedin the approach runways to the various bases or positions upon the diamond; and- Fig. 11 is a schematic wiring diagram of the electric circuit embodied in the invention. 55 A preferred form of the present game appathe diamond 22'. 1O

Arranged at the four corners of the playing field or diamond 22 are first, second, and third bases, and =home plate, 23, 24, 25' and 26, re spectively, and arranged upon the inclined playing board I! atfirst, second, and third bases, i

23, 24, and 25, respectively, are metallic contact plates 86, (Figs. 1 and 4).

Slidably mounted in the cabinet l6, below the inclined playing board I1 is a main-operating bar 21, (Fig. 2), which has a depending arm 28 at one end thereof and engageable with this arm 28 is the movable element 29 of a solenoid 30. The slide bar 21 has three upwardly extending and ball-stopping arms 3|, 32, and 33,gwhich are: arranged, respectively, at first, second, and third base positions on the diamond or playing field 22 and these'upwardly extending and ballstopping arms 3|, 32,and 33 are slidably arranged in cut-out openings or slots 34which are provided in the inclined playing board [1, (Fig. 2), at first, second, and third base positions, respectlvely.

In addition to the upwardly projecting and ball-stopping arms 3| 32, and 33, the slide bar- 21 has an upwardly extending and ball-advancing 35 arm 35, (Fig. 2), which projects upwardlythrough a slot 36 which is formed in the inclined playing board IT and at a point arranged adjacent the first base position 23; andthe slide bar 2'! has a second upwardly extending arm 31 which also projects above the inclined playing board ll, through a slot 38 formed therein, at a point adjacent third base position 25, (Fig. 2).

Provided in the approach runway I 8, to first base position 23, (Figs. 1 and 2), is a pivoted contact or circuit-closing switch 39, (Fig. 10). Provided in the approach runway Hi to second base position 24 are'two spaced switch members 40 and 4| which are similar to the switch 39, (Fig. 10). Provided in the approach runway 20 J to third base position 25 are three switches '42, 43, and 44 which are similar to the switch 39, (Fig. 10), and provided in the approach runway 2| to the home base position 26 are three switches 45,

46, and 41 which are similar to the switch 39, (Fig. 10).

The switches 39 to 41 inclusive are arranged in an electrical circuit which is generally indicated at 48, (Fig. 11) and which includes a suitable source of current 49, which may be a battery of dry cells arranged in the cabinet [6.

The arrangement of the switches 39 to 41 inclusive in the circuit 48, (Fig. 11), is such that if a ball enters the approach runway [8 to first base it will engage the switch 39 and thereby close the circuit 48 to the electromagnet 30, thus actuating the electromagnet 30 which thereupon attracts its pivotal armature 29, (Figs. 2 and 6). This movement of the pivotal armature 29 causes the same to engage the depending arm 28 of the slide bar 21, thereby shifting the slide bar 21 (right to left, Fig. 2). This movement of the slide bar 21 causes the ball-stopping arms 32 and 33 to be removed from engagement with such balls as may be disposed at second and third base positions upon the diamond 22, at the same time causes the arms 3|, 35 and 31 to engage the balls which may be disposed, respectively, at first, sec- 0nd, and third base positions, thereby advancing each of the balls, which may be disposed in the runway or diamond, one base.

Similarly, if a ball enters the approach runway Hi to second base position, it will successively engage the switches and 4| and thereby suc-.

cessively vclose the circuit 48 to the electromagnet 30 twice in succession, thereby twice in succession shifting the slide bar 21, (right to left, Fig. 2), and thus successively advancing each of the balls, which may be disposed upon the diamond 22, two bases Similarly, when a ball enters the approach runway 20 to the third base position, it successively engages the switches 42, 43, and 44 and thus three times in relatively rapid succession closes the circuit 48 to the electromagnet 30, thereby three times in relatively rapid succession shifting the slide bar 21 (right to left, Fig. 2) and thus advancing each of the balls disposed upon the diamond 22, three bases.

In the same manner, when a ball enters the approach runway 2| to home base position it successively engages the three switches 45, 46 and 41 and thereby closes the circuit 48 to the electromagnet 30 three times in relatively rapid succession, thus three times in succession shifting the slide bar 21 (right to left, Fig. 2) and thus advancing each of the balls which may be disposed upon the diamond 22, three bases.

Provided in the inclined board l'l. at various preselected points, are ball exit or out Openings I03, and arranged in the cabinet l6 under the inclined playing board I1, and in communication with the ball exit or out openings 103, is a ball return runway 50, (Fig. 5).

The ball return runway 50 includes an inclined lower end portion 51, (Fig. 5), and arranged in this inclined lower end portion 51 of the ball return runway 50, (Fig. 5), is a series of three pairs of contacts or switches 5l 52, 5354, and 55-56 which are arranged in a circuit 96, (Fig. 11). Likewise embodied in the circuit 96 are three signal lights 58, 59, and 60, respectively, and these signal lights 58, 59, and may be mounted at any suitable'point in the cabinet [6 so as to be visible to the player.

The out? balls are, temporarily retained in the lower end portion 51 of the ball return runway 58 by an angled arm or stop'portion 6| of a mem- Y -ber 62 which is pivotally mounted, as at 63, upon the incline-d playing board ll, (Fig. 5), and at the bottom side of the latter. This member 6 I- 62-63 includes an offset arm 64 which projects under a slide bar 65 which is slidably mounted upon the inclined playing board ll, at the bottom side of the latter, and this slide bar 65 has a depending cam portion 66 which is engageable with the offset arm 64 of the member 63, (Fig. I) The slide bar 65 is normally urged (right to left, Fig. 6) by its resettingspring 12.

The slide bar 65 has an arm 61 (Fig. 6) and engageable with this arm 61 is an arm 68 of a latch member 69 which is pivotally mounted upon the bottom side of the inclined playing board ll, as at 10. Associated with this latch member 68--69 is an electromagnet H, which is arranged in an electric circuit 91, (Fig. 11).

, Arranged adjacent to the slide bar 65 and likewise slidably mounted upon the inclined playing board 11, on the bottom side of the latter, is a second slide bar 13 which has a depending arm l0l, (Fig. 6), and this sli-de bar 13 is likewise urged (right to left, Fig. 6) by a resetting spring [5. Attached to the slide bar 13, (Fig. 6), is a cross arm I00 and attached to the slide bar 65 is a cross arm I92 which is engageable with the cross bar I06.

Arranged below the ball exit opening 99, (Fig. 5), is an inclined ball return runway 16, (Fig. '7)

and pivotally mounted upon this inclined runway I6 is a horizontally extending rod ll, (Fig. 8), which has a depending arm 18 and this arm 18 is adapted to be projected into the path of balls traveling towards the elevator guideway or groove 19. This rod 11 has an angled or cam portion with which the depending arm 14 of the slide bar 65 is engageable, (Fig. 7), when the slide bar 65 is moved (right to left, Figs. 5, 6 and '7).

The diamond 22 is defined by an inner rail and an outer rail, (Fig. 1), and the inner one of these two rails (Figs. 2 and 9) includes a relatively stationary portion 84 and a vertically movable portion 82. Thisportion 82 is slidably mounted upon pins 83 which are slidably mounted in guides I04- which are attached to the inclined playing board ll, (Fig. 9).

Arranged at first, second, and third base positions is a relatively movable or resilient flat metal contact plate 86 and adapted to be engaged by each of these contact plates 86 is a relatively stationary contact 81, (Fig. 4). These contacts or switches 86 and 81 are arranged in an electrical circuit 93, (Fig. 4), which includes a plurality of indicator lights 88, (Fig. 4) which are adapted to indicate, when illuminated, the position of the balls upon the bases.

Provided in the inclined playing board I! adjacent-the lower end of the latter, is a slot 89. (Figs. 1 and 5), and projecting into and movable in this slot 89 is a stop pin 96 which is attached to and carried by the slide bar 65, (Fig. '7) The purpose of this stop pin 90 will be explained hereinafter.

Operation Balls may be propelled, one at a time, up the ramp or runway 95, onto the upper portion of the inclined playing board I! so that they may gravitate thereover and enter into any one of the approach runways l8, I9, 20 and 2| to the baseball diamond 22, oryas the case may be, into one of the out openings I03.

, Assuming, for the purpose of illustration, that a ball which is propelled onto the upper portion of the inclined playing board I! enters the approach runway I8 to first base position: In this case the ball will engage and close the switch 39, thereby closing the circuit 48 to the electromagnet 38. When the circuit 48 to the electromagnet 30 is thus closed, the electromagnet 30 attracts its pivotalarmature 28, thereby moving the latter into engagement with the depending arm 28 of the slide bar 21, (Fig. 2). This engagement of the pivotal armature 29 with the depending arm 28 of the slide bar 2'! shifts theilatter (right to left, Fig. 2) thereby moving the upwardlyextending arms or ball stops 32 and 33, which are formed as a part of the slide bar 21, out of engagement with the balls disposed at second and third base positions upon the diamond 22. At the same time, this movement of the slide bar 21 (right to left, Fig. 2) moves the upwardly extending and ball-advancing arms 3|, 35, and 31, (Fig. 2), into engagement with the balls disposed at first, second, and third base positions upon the diamond 22, thereby advancing each of such balls one base.

Similarly, if a ball enters the approach runway I8 to second base position, it will successively engage and close the switches 48 and M, and thereby twice in succession close the circuit 48 to the electromagnet 38,'thus moving the slide bar 2! twice in succession (right to left, Fig. 2), thereby moving the stop arms 32 and 33 out of engagement with the balls disposed at second and third base positions and, at the same time, moving the ball-advancing arms SI, 35, and 31 of the slide bar 21 twice in succession into engagement with the balls disposed at first, second, and third base positions, respectively, upon the diamond 22.

In a similar manner, a ball entering the approach runway 28 to third base will successively engage the three switches 42, 43, and 44 in succession, and will thereby three times, in relatively rapid succession, close the circuit 48 to the electromagnet 38 and thus operate the bar 2! three times in relatively rapid succession.

Similarly, a ball entering the approach runway 2I to home base will engage the three switches 45, 46, and 41 in relatively rapid succession and. will thus three times in relatively rapid succession close the circuit 48 to the electromagnet 36 and thus operate the slide bar 21; it being noted that the slide bar 21 is returned to its initial position, after each operation there of, by its resetting spring I85 (Fig. 2).

The balls which enter the runs opening 26, (Fig. 1), pass therethrough and actuate a registering device, which is generally indicated at II, (Fig. 5), and which is of thetype described and claimed in the applicants Patent No. 1,992,558, and the spent balls which enter the .out opening 99, (Fig. 1), fall therethrough ontoan in clined ball return runway I6 (Fig. 5).

The played balls which enter the out openings, such as I83, which are provided in the inclined playing board I'I, drop by gravity into the inclined runway 58 and travel, by gravity, down the latter into the lower and inclined end portion 51 of the latter. The first ball traveling down the runway 58 to the lower and inclined end portion 51 of the latter engages the upwardly extending or angled stop arm 61 of the pivotal bar 62, and the ball is thus stopped 'upon' the contact 5!, (Fig. 5), and thereby forces the latter into engagement with the contact 52, thus closing the circuit 96, (Fig. 11), to the signal light 58 which indicates one out.

The second ball which travels down the runway50 to the lower end portion 51 of the latter engages the first ball, which is stopped by the arm M, and comes to rest upon the contact 53, thereby forcing the same into engagement with the contact 54, and. thus closing the circuitI85, (Fig. 11) to the signal light 59, which indicates two outs.

In a similar manner, the third out" ball which enters the runway 58 comes to rest upon the contact 55 and thereby forces the latter into engagement' with the contact 56. When the switch 55- 56 is thus closed, by the third out ball entering the lower and inclined end portion 51 of the ball runway 58, the circuit 81, (Fig. 11), is closed, and the electromagnet 'II being thus actuated, attracts the arm 69 of the pivotal latch member 6866, thereby pivoting the same at I8 (clockwise, Fig. 6), and thus moving the arm 68 of the latch member 6869 out of latching engagement with the arm 61 of the slide bar 65, whereupon the resetting spring 12, for the slide bar 65, slides the same (right tov left, Fig. 6).

During this movement of the slide bar 65 (right to left, Figs. 6 and 7), the depending cam portion 66 thereof engages the offset arm 64 of the member 63 and thereby pivotsthe member 63 (counterclockwise, from full to dotted line position, Fig. 5) This movement of the member 62 (from full to dotted line position, Fig. 5) moves the upwardly extending stop arm or end portion 6! thereof up above the lower and inclined end portion 51 of the ball return runway 50, thereby releasing the balls which were held in the inclined portion 5'! of the runway 50 upon the switches 5I-52, 53-54, and 5556 whereupon.

the thus released balls may travel, by gravity, to a point adjacent the propelling means 92.

At the same time, this movement of the angled end or stop portion H of the member 62 up out of engagement with the balls stopped thereby in the lower and inclined end portion 51 of the runway 50, causes the arm 6| of the member 62 to engage the flat plate '98, which is attached to the pins 83 at the lower ends of the latter (Fig. 9), thereby lifting the plate 98, pins 83, and the rail 82, (Figs. 1, 2, 5, and 9), upwardly. In this manner, the rail 82 is raised up out of engagement with the balls disposed at first, second, and third base positions upon the diamond 22, thus releasing any balls disposed at these positions and allowing the same to travel by gravity down the inclined playing board I'I (right to left, Fig. 1), down which they are guid ed by the rail84 into the out opening 85 which is provided in the inclined playing board I! adjacent the home base position, (Fig. 1). The fiat plate 98 being thus raised engages the contact I68 and urges the latter into engagement with the contact I89 (Fig. 9), thereby closing the circuit I81 (Fig.11) to the signal light 60 which indicates three outs.

Whenthe pivotal latch member 6869 is released, by actuation of the electromagnet 'II, from latching engagement with the arm 61 of the slide bar 65, the resetting spring 12 moves the slide bar 65 (right to left, Figs. 6 and 7), and during this movement of the slide bar 65 the cross arm I82 thereof engages the cross arm I68 which is attached to the slide bar I3, both slide bars 65 and I3 being held in this position until thecoin slide 82 is operated.

During this movement of the slide bar 65, (right to left, Figs. 5, 6, and7), the depending arm 74 thereof engages the angled or cam por' tion :88 of the pivotal ball-stopping member 11 (Figs. 5 and 8), and thus rocks this member 11 (counterclockwise; Fig. 5, clockwise, Fig. 8) thereby moving the arm 18 of the member 11 into position to-prevent the passage of balls into the elevator guideway or groove 19, (Fig. 8) into the ramp 95, and in front of the ball-propelling device or plunger 9|.

When the slide'bar 65 is thus shifted (right to left, Figs. 6 and '7), after the third on the stoppin 90 carried thereby moves from right to left in the slot 89 (Fig. '7) and in so doing moves into the path of balls traveling from the ramp or runway 95 (Fig; 1), onto the playing field of the inclined playing board so that any ball or balls which may: be propelled out of the ramp or runway 95, when the stop 90 is thus positioned (as in dotted lines, Fig. '7), will engage the stop 90 and will thus be prevented from traveling from the ramp 95 onto the playing field of the inclined playing board .However, when the coin slide 82 is moved (left to right, Figs. 5, 6,), its inner end engages the depending arm of the slide bar 73 (Figs. 5, 6, and '7), and'thereby shifts the slide bar I3 (left to right, Figs. 5, 6, and '7), against the action of its resetting spring 15. During this movement of the slide bar 13 (left to right, Figs. 5, 6, and 7), the cross arm I00 thereof engages the cross arm I02, which is carried by the slide bar 65, and thereby shifts the slide bar 65 (left to right, Figs. 5, 6, and 7), against the action of its resetting spring 12. During this movement of the slide bar 65 (left to right, Figs. 5, 6, and 1), the stop pin 99 is moved (left to right, from dotted to full line position, Fig. '7) out of the path of balls traveling from the ramp 95 onto the playing field of the inclined playing board When the slide bar 65 is disposed in its initial or retracted position, (as in dotted lines, Fig. 6), the spring 8| urges the pivotal latch member 6869 in a direction (counterclockwise, Fig. 6) to dispose the arm 68 of the latch member 68-69 against one lateral side or edge of the arm 51 of the slide .bar 55. However, when the slide bar 65 is shifted (left to right, Figs. 5, 6, and 7) by the action of the coin slide 82 and the slide bar 13, the arm 6'! of the slide bar 65 passes beyond the arm 68 of the latch member 68-69, whereupon the spring 8| urges the latch member 6869 (counterclockwise, Fig. 6), thereby disposing the arm 68 of the latch member 58-69 in latching engagement with the arm 68 of the slide bar.65.

During this movement of the slide bar 65 (left to right, Figs. 5, 6, and 7), the depending cam portion 66 thereof engages the offset arm 64 of the member 6|-B283-64 and thereby pivots this member (clockwise, from dotted to full line position, Fig. thus moving the stop arm 6| thereof into effective position (as in full lines, Fig. 5) and in which position the upwardly extending arm 6| of the member 6|62-63-64 prevents the passage of balls out of the lower and inclined end portion 51 of the runway 50.

However, when the slide bar 65 is again moved (left to right, Figs. 5 and 6) by the action of the coin slide 82, the depending arm ||l| of the slide bar 13 moves out of engagement with the angled or cam portion 80 of the member 11, whereupon the arm 18 of the member 11 pivots by gravity back into its initial position, (as in full lines, Fig. 8).

When a ball is disposed, for example, at first base position. it rests upon the corresponding contact plate 85, (Figs. 2 and 4), and thereby moves the latter into engagement with the corresponding stationary contact BI, thus closing the circuit 93 (Fig. 4) to a signal light 88 (Fig. 4) which indicates that there is a ball disposed at first base position.

In a similar manner, balls which are disposed at second and third base positions rest upon the corresponding contact plates 86 and thereby force the same into engagement with the corresponding stationary contacts 81 (Fig. 4) thus closing circuits, similar to the circuit 93, (Fig. 4), to signal lights similar to the light 88, soas to indicate that balls are disposed at second and third base positions upon the diamond 22.

It is to be noted that the arm 3| of the member 21 is both a ball-stopping" and a balladvancing arm since when this arm 3| is in its normal position it stops a ball which is disposed at first base position from gravitating over the inclined playing board (right to left, Fig. l) and when the member 21 is operated the arm 3| engages the ball disposed at first base position and advances the same toward second base position.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred form of construction for carrying my invention into effect, this is capable of variation and modification, without departing from the spirit of the invention. I, therefore, do not wish to be limited to the precise details of construction set forth, but desire to avail myself of such variations and modifications as come within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

1. In a game apparatus, the combination of a cabinet including an inclined playing board provided with a ball exit opening and including a playing field; an inclined ball return runway in said cabinet below said exit opening; a ball runway or ramp for conducting balls onto said playing field; means for propelling balls along said second-named runway or ramp onto said playing field; means including a member movably mounted in said cabinet for movement into position to prevent the passage of balls from said ramp or second-named runway onto said playing field; means for stopping balls in said first-named runway; and means actuated by the last of a predetermined number of balls stopped in said firstnamed runway by said stopping means for moving said member into position to prevent the passage of balls from said ramp onto said playing field.

2. In a game apparatus, the combination of: a cabinet including an inclined playing board having openings formed therein and having a baseball diamond thereon; said diamond including ball runways arranged between the base positions thereon; approach runways leading to the said base positions and first-named runways upon said diamond; electric switches arranged in said approach runways and actuated by the weight of balls traveling therealong; and means including a device actuated by the weight of balls traveling along said approach runways over said switches for advancing balls from one base position to another upon said diamond; said means comprising a member movably mounted in said cabinet below said inclined playing board and having arms projecting upwardly above said inclined playing board through certain of said openings; said means including a device actuated by the closing of said switches for moving said movably mounted member so as to move the said arms thereof into engagement with balls disposed at the said base positions upon said diamond; said member having other arms thereon projecting upwardly above said inclined playing board through certain others of said openings for stopping balls disposed at certain of the base positions upon said diamond; said second-named arms being moved, by said member, into position to release balls stopped thereby for movement over said inclined playing board when the said first-named arms of said member are moved into engagement with balls disposed at the base positions on said diamond.

3. In a game apparatus, the combination of: a cabinet including an inclined playing board having two spaced ball exit openings provided therein and having a diamond provided thereon;

said diamond being defined by substantially horizontally extending rails and including a vertically movable rail normally retaining balls at certain of the base positions upon said diamond and against gravitation thereover; a ball return runway below said inclined playing board and in communication with one of said ball exitopenings; means for stopping balls in said runway; and means including a device actuated by the last of a predetermined number of balls stopped in said runway by said stopping means for lifting said vertically movable rail so as to release balls stopped thereby at certain of the base positions upon said diamond so that said balls thus released may gravitate over said diamond into the other of said ball exit openings.

LOUIS W. GEN SBURGA

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2860878 *Feb 25, 1957Nov 18, 1958Hughes ElmerSimulated baseball game
US2901253 *Jan 11, 1955Aug 25, 1959Jr Harry C GrantSimulated baseball game apparatus
US4055342 *Dec 8, 1976Oct 25, 1977Epoch Co., Ltd.Baseball game amusement device
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/108.3, 273/121.00A
International ClassificationA63F7/02, A63D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/027
European ClassificationA63F7/02P1