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Publication numberUS2050535 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 11, 1936
Filing dateNov 26, 1935
Priority dateNov 26, 1935
Publication numberUS 2050535 A, US 2050535A, US-A-2050535, US2050535 A, US2050535A
InventorsEdgar J Martel
Original AssigneeEdgar J Martel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stocking with elastic areas
US 2050535 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 11, 1936. E. .1. MARTEL STOCKING WITH ELASTIC AREAS Filed Nov. 26, 1955 Patented Aug. 11', 1936 UNITED STATES PATET OFFICE STOCKING WITH ELASTIC AREAS Edgar J. Martel, Laconia, N. H. Application November 26, 1935, Serial No. 51,609

6 Claims.

It is an object of the invention to provide a stocking which will present a sightly appearance but which will be adapted to provide extra support for the arch'of the foot so as to tend to prevent falling arches and to achieve other beneficial results.

According to the invention, I provide fa stocking or the like having a front portion knit in the customary manner of inelastic yarn so that the stocking for the most part presents the customary appearance. For arch-supporting purposes, I knit into a substantial area of the sole portion of the stocking an additional yarn consisting of a very fine filament of rubber having a covering of cotton, silk, rayon or the like. Elastic yarns of this kind can now be obtained in sizes small enough to be knitted by the needles of knitting machines regularly used in the manufacture of stockings, socks and the like. The elastic yarn is preferably knitted in with the inelastic yarn in designated areas after the manner of a reinforcing yarn. Thus, if desired, the elastic yarn maym be knitted with the inelastic yarn in every stitch in such areas, or, if less bulk is desired in such areas, the elastic yam may be knitted into certain stitches oi the inelastic yarn and floated past intervening stitches or the elastic yarn may be knitted into selected courses of loops. Knitting elastic yam with the inelastic yarn in a substantial portion of the sole of a stocking results in an arch-supporting effect without detracting from the appearance of the stocking when worn. Additional support for the arch may be obtained by extending the elastic area so asto encircle the heel pocket. This in eifect provides an elastic band engaging the tendon of the wearer above the heel and extending down to the sole area on both sides of the heel, thus pulling upwardly on the sole area, especially the portion thereofadjacent to the heel pocket. V

If desired, the elastic area' above the heel at the rear of the stocking may be extended, preferably in a relatively narrow bandyup the back or seam of the stocking. If a garter effect is desired at the top of the stocking, this band may be widened at the top of the stocking into an area of substantial circumferential dimension to provide circumferential tension at the top of the stocking and thus to obviate the need for a separate garter.

Other advantageous features of the invention will be apparent to one skilled in the art from the description thereof which follows and from the illustration thereof on the drawing of which Figure 1 is a view of a stocking embodying the 10 invention.

Figures 2 and 3 are fragmentary elevations of stockings having diiferently arranged elastic areas.

Figure 4 is a diagrammatic showing of one 15 manner of knitting elastic yarn with the inelastic yarn.

Figure 5 is a diagrammatic showing of a different way of knitting elastic yarn with the inelastic yarn.

In Figure 1 is illustrated a stocking l0 made of 20 silk, cotton, rayon or other substantially inelastic yarn and having the usual toe pocket I2 and heel pocket l4. According to the invention, into the sole portion IE, or a substantial part of it, is 25 knitted an elastic yarn with the inelastic yarn.

The elastic yarn, being formed into loops by the knitting needles, results in an area of knitted fabric which has tension in two directions and which exerts a supporting force on the in tep of 5 20' on either side of the heel pocket. In such case, the heel pocket is entirely surrounded by elastic fabric so that the areas l8 and 20 form a loop which engages the tendon of the wearer abpve the heel and exerts a supporting force on the area It, particularly that portion of the area which is adjacent to the heel pocket II and thus comes immediately beneath the cuneiform bone which-is the keystone of the bony arch structure improve the fit of the stocking by providing an 5/ elastic area to take up any slack which might otherwise result in looseness of fit at any portion of the stocking leg. At the top of the stocking, a wider area 24 may be provided, this area being adapted to provide enough circumferential tension to act as a hose supporter and to obviate the use of an encircling garter or supporter of any other type.

Figure 2 illustrates a stocking wherein the sole area I6 is connected by connecting areas 20 to a heel area 28 somewhat similar to the area I8 but having no seam area 22 extending up therefrom.

Figure 3 illustrates another embodiment of the invention, comprising a sole area 30 which is somewhat wider than the sole area l6 and is connected to a heel area 32 by connecting areas 34, the heel area being shown as narrowing to a point.

It is evident from the illustrations on the drawing that the stocking embodying the inventions presents substantially the customary appearance, such stocking having no elastic reinforcing yarn in the front portion thereof from top to toe, although I would not deem it a departure from the invention to supply a stocking having elastic. area encircling the top of the stocking; The entire stocking is knitted of inelastic thread, the elastic thread being added only to such portions thereof as form the elastic areas. If desired, in the elastic areas the elastic reinforcing yarn may be knitted into every stitch of the inelastic yarn. This results in a comparatively bulky fabric owing to the comparative bulk of the elastic yarn. If less bulk is desired, the elastic yarn in the elastic areas may be knitted into alternate courses or into every third or fourth course, as desired. For example, in Figure 4 is shown a diagrammatic view of elastic yarn 40 knitted in the usual manner,

.there being added to alternate courses thereof an elastic yarn 42. Obviously, two or more courses can be skipped each time instead of the single courses skipped as shown in Figure 4. Figure 5 illustrates another way of reducing the bulk of the elastic areas. Astherein shown, the elastic yarn is knitted into every course but loops are formed only with alternate loops of the inelastic yarn 40. As shown, the stitches including the elastic yarn are formed in wales alternating with wales past which the elastic yarn is floated. There may be two or more spacing wales between successive wales containing elastic yarn stitches, if desired. Or, if desired, the stitches including the elastic yarn may me staggered in successive courses so that all of the wales may contain loops of elastic yarn.

Stockings embodying the invention may be knitted upon circular machines or upon flat machines, the elastic yarn being introduced in the same manner as reinforcing yarns are customarily introduced. The variations illustrated in Figures 4 and 5 may be obtained by suitable ,control of the feeding finger through which the elastic yarn is supplied or by the control of individual knitting needles, or both.

It is evident that various modifications and changes may be made in the particular embodiments of the invention herein shown and described without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as defined in the following claims.

I claim:--

1. A stocking or the like knitted of inelastic yarn, said stocking having an arch-supporting area in which an elastic yarn is knitted into certain of the stitches of inelastic yarn. said area comprising a substantial portion of the sole of the stocking and entirely encircling the heel pocket, the front of the ankle and foot portions of said stocking having no elastic yarn therein.

2. A stocking or the like knitted of inelastic yarn, said stocking having limited areas in which an elastic yarn is knitted in with the inelastic yarn, said areas consisting of a substantial portion of the sole, an area immediately above the heel pocket, and areas connecting said sole and heel areas to encircle the heel pocket, the front of the ankle and foot portions of the stocking having an elastic yarn therein.

3. A stocking or the like knitted of inelastic yarn, said stocking having an area in which elastic yarn is knitted into spaced stitches of the inelastic yarn and floated past the inter-' vening stitches, said area including a substantial portion of the sole of the stocking and entirely surrounding the heel pocket, the front of the ankle and foot portions of said stocking having no elastic yarn therein.

4; A stocking or the like knitted of inelastic yarn, said stocking having an area in which an elastic yarn is knitted in with the inelastic yarn, said area extending up the back of the stocking from the heel pocket to the top and comprising a narrow intermediate portion and wider portions adjacent to the heel pocket and top, the front of said stocking from top to toe having no elastic yarn therein.

5. A stocking or the like knitted of inelastic yarn, said stocking having an area in which an elastic yarn is knitted in withthe inelastic yarn, said area comprising a substantial portion of the sole and entirely encircling the heel pocket, said area also extending up the back of the stocking to the top thereof and widening nearthe top, the front of said stocking from top to toe having no elastic yarn therein.

6. A stocking or the like knitted of inelastic yarn, said stocking having connected areas in which an elastic yarn is knitted in with the inelastic yam, one said area comprising a portion of the sole of the stocking, another said area being at the rear of the upper portion of the stocking, the front of said stocking having no elastic yarn therein.

EDGAR J. MAR'I'EL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2503444 *Oct 23, 1947Apr 11, 1950Scott & Williams IncRib knitted fabric containing inlaid rubber and bare knitted rubber
US2581322 *Apr 7, 1949Jan 1, 1952James R Kendrick Co IncElastic fabric
US2627173 *Feb 26, 1948Feb 3, 1953Hirsch HarryTwo-way stretch fabric
US3386270 *Apr 18, 1966Jun 4, 1968Alamance Ind IncMan's support sock and method of forming same
US3425246 *Sep 22, 1966Feb 4, 1969Kendall & CoProtuberance covering tubular elastic garments
US3501930 *May 16, 1967Mar 24, 1970Chadbourn IncSheer knit fabric
US4149274 *Oct 10, 1978Apr 17, 1979Alba-Waldensian, IncorporatedAnti-slip hosiery article and method
US4216662 *Mar 3, 1978Aug 12, 1980Pickett Hosiery Mills, Inc.Cushion stitch construction for men's hosiery
US5103656 *Mar 27, 1990Apr 14, 1992Nk Mills, Inc.Split-heel sock
US6471219Mar 21, 2000Oct 29, 2002Benetton Sportsystem Usa, Inc.Adjustable fit in-line skate
US6588771Jun 11, 2002Jul 8, 2003Benetton Sportsystem Usa, Inc.Adjustable fit in-line skate
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US20060196260 *Mar 7, 2006Sep 7, 2006Khajavi C SSimple method and apparatus for quickly and accurately determining pressure points imposed on the foot by a ski boot
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US20120180195 *Jan 14, 2011Jul 19, 2012James Troy ShullSocks having areas of varying stretchability and methods of manufacturing same
US20120284902 *Jan 24, 2011Nov 15, 2012Kazuhiko MatsuoFoot wear
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EP2526790A4 *Jan 24, 2011Jan 8, 2014Kowa CoFoot wear
WO2014183030A1 *May 9, 2014Nov 13, 2014Aaron HenningsHigh perfomance sport socks
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/178.00R, 66/185, 66/182, 66/178.00A
International ClassificationD04B9/46
Cooperative ClassificationD04B1/18, D04B1/26
European ClassificationD04B1/18, D04B1/26