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Publication numberUS2051415 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 18, 1936
Filing dateNov 11, 1935
Priority dateNov 11, 1935
Publication numberUS 2051415 A, US 2051415A, US-A-2051415, US2051415 A, US2051415A
InventorsPayson Peter
Original AssigneeCrucible Steel Co America
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat treated alloy steel
US 2051415 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Aug. 18, 3936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE HEAT TREATED ALLOY sTEEL Peter Payson, New York, N. Y., assignor to Crucible Steel Company of America, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New .iersey No Drawing.

10 Claims.

ing tools, and more generally for use in articles requiring great strength, hardn ss and resistance to corrosion and oxidation at elevated temperatures.

10 In my application Ser. No. 6,645, filed February 15, 1935, for Letters Patent No. 2,009;9"l4, and in a division thereof, Ser. No. 33,795, filed July 29, 1935, of which this application is. a continuation in part, I have described a new heat and corrosion resisting steel and a method of treating the same whereby said steel may be hardened by said treatment up to C 65 Rockwell or more for certain analyses. The new steel, when so hardened, does not suffer any substantial permanent reduction in hardness after heating as high as 1400 or 1600 F. and in some instances to even higher temperal tures. It possesses a'degree of hardness at temperatures of 1100 to 1800 F. which is superior to that of steels previously known. It is, moreover, highly resistant to corrosion, oxidation and scaling at elevated as well as at atmospheric temperatures, including conditions prevailing in the exhaust passages of internal combustion engines operated by either standard or special fuel mixtures, such as the so-called anti-knock varieties.

In my patent referred to, the new steel is stated to contain as essential ingredients in addition to iron: about 18% to chromium, about 1% to 85 10% of a nickel-like metal, such as either or both -of nickel and manganese, about 1% to 10% of a molybdenum-like metal, such as either or both of molybdenum and tungsten, in proportions to render the steel initially ferritic, i. e., ferritic in 4 the "as rolled, as forged", as cast or as annealed" I condition.

Steel conforming to the information above set forth may, in accordance with a further aspect of the invention of my patent aforesaid, be hardened by heating to some temperature within the approximate temperature range of 1200 to 1800 F. for an interval required to secure a desired hardening, the most appropriate temperature, within the range specified, beingdependent on.

60 the particular'composition of the steel to be hardened.

Whereas, however, my patent aforesaid sets the upper limit for carbon at about 1.0%, I have found that steels otherwise conforming to my invention 5 but containing carbon considerably in excess of Application November 11, 1935,

Serial No. 49,163

1%, are, nevertheless, susceptible to substantial increases in hardness on heating. I conclude from my investigations that carbon may be present in such steels in amount up to about 4.0%

or more. 5

My patent aforesaid mentions only molybdenum andtungsten as appropriate for the molybdenum-like constituent of the new steel. I have. however, observed that as regards its effect on hardenability, silicon may be substituted in whole 1 or in part for the molybdenum-like metal as is evidenced by the following test data:

TABLEEFFECT on ST AND M0 0N HABDENABILITY C constant at .15% Ni constant at 4.75%. Cr 1 constant at 25%Hordness Rockwell "C" Steels otherwise conforming to the information above set forth but containing one or more of the elements cobalt, aluminum, copper and vanadium in aggregate amount up to about 5% may be heat hardened by the method indicated. Additions of one or more of these elements to the new steel are sometimes'desirable to increase the toughness, forgeability, etc.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that making a small allowance for impurities the quantity of iron in the steel may be as low as about 36% or as high as about 80% by weight of the total.

What I claim is:

1. An alloy steel which is hardened by heating within the approximate temperature range of 1200 to 1800 F., containing: about 18 to 35% 5 chromium, about 1 to 10% of metal of'the group consisting of nickel and manganese, about .5 to 10% silicon and about .5 to 10% of metal of the group consisting of molybdenum and tungsten, the content of silicon, molybdenum and tungsten aggregating about 1 to 10%, carbon up to about 4%, and the balance substantially iron in proportions to render said steel initially ferritic.

' 2. An alloy steel which is hardened by heating within the approximate temperature range of 1200 to 1800 F. and which is characterized by undergoing no substantial reduction in hardness after heating to temperatures as high as about 1400 F., said steel containing: about 18 to chromium, about 1 to 10% of metal of the group consisting of nickel and manganese, about .5 to

10% silicon and about .5 to 10% of metal of the group consisting of molybdenum and tungsten, the content oi'silicon, molybdenum and tungs en aggregating about 1 to 10%, not more than about 5% in aggregate of other steel alloying elements primarily for imparting other than heat hardening properties to the steel, carbon up to about 4%, and the balance all iron in proportions to render said steel initially i'erritic.

3. An alloy steel which is hardened by heating within the approximate temperature range of 1200 to 1800" F., containing: about 18 to 35% chromium, about 1 to 10% of metal or the group consisting of nickel and manganese, about 1 to 10% silicon, carbon up to about 4%, and the balance substantially iron in proportion to render said steel initially rerritic.

- 4. An alloy steel which is hardened by heating within the approximate temperature range 01' 1200 to 1800 F., and which is characterized by undergoing no substantial reduction in hardness after heating to temperatures as high as about 1400 F., said steel containing: about 18 to 35% chromium, about 1 to 10% of metal of the group consisting of nickel and manganese, about i to 10% silicon, not more than about 5% in aggregate of other steel alloying elements primarily for imparting other than heat hardening properties to the steel, carbon up to about 4%, and the balance all iron in proportions to render-said steel initially Ierritic.

bustion engines made of 5. An alloy steel which is hardened by heating within the approximate temperature range of 1200 to 1800 F., said steel having a hardness in excess of about 0" 32 Rockwell and undergoing no substantial reduction in hardness after heating to temperatures as high as about 1400 F.. said steel containing: about 18 to 35% chromium, about 1 to 10% of metal 01' the group consisting of nickel and manganese, about .5 to 10% silicon and about .5 to 10% oi metal of the group consisting of molybdenum and tungsten, in proportions to render said steel initially i'erritic, the content of silicon, tungsten and molybdenum aggregating about 1 to 10%.

6. An alloy steel which is hardened by heating within the approximate temperature range of 1200 to 1800 F., said steel having a hardness in excess oi about "0 32 Rockwell and undergoing no substantial reduction in hardness after heating to temperatures as high as about 1400" F., said steel containing: about 18 to 35% chromium, about 1 to 10% of metal 01' the group consisting oi nickel and manganese, and about 1 to 10% silicon, in proportions to render said steel initially terrltic.

7. A valve or valve element for internal coman alloy steel according to claim 2.

8. A valve or valve element for internal combustion engines made of an alloy steel according to claim 4.

9. A metal cutting, forming or shearing tool made of an alloy steel according to claim 2.

10. A metal cutting, forming or shearing tool made 01' an alloy steel according to claim 4.

PETER PAYSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2671726 *Nov 14, 1950Mar 9, 1954Armco Steel CorpHigh temperature articles
US2861883 *Feb 9, 1956Nov 25, 1958Cooper Alloy CorpPrecipitation hardenable, corrosion resistant, chromium-nickel stainless steel alloy
US3501976 *Feb 24, 1966Mar 24, 1970Thompson Mfg Co Earl ACamshaft
US3837847 *Dec 23, 1971Sep 24, 1974Int Nickel CoCorrosion resistant ferritic stainless steel
US3895940 *Dec 23, 1971Jul 22, 1975Int Nickel CoCorrosion resistant high chromium ferritic stainless steel
US4640817 *Jul 27, 1984Feb 3, 1987Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd.Dual-phase stainless steel with improved resistance to corrosion by nitric acid
US6871622Oct 18, 2002Mar 29, 2005Maclean-Fogg CompanyLeakdown plunger
US7028654Oct 18, 2002Apr 18, 2006The Maclean-Fogg CompanyMetering socket
US7128034Oct 18, 2002Oct 31, 2006Maclean-Fogg CompanyValve lifter body
US7191745Oct 18, 2002Mar 20, 2007Maclean-Fogg CompanyValve operating assembly
US7273026Oct 18, 2002Sep 25, 2007Maclean-Fogg CompanyRoller follower body
US7281329Feb 2, 2004Oct 16, 2007Maclean-Fogg CompanyMethod for fabricating a roller follower assembly
US7284520Mar 8, 2007Oct 23, 2007Maclean-Fogg CompanyValve lifter body and method of manufacture
DE1076162B *Nov 4, 1955Feb 25, 1960Teves Kg AlfredVerwendung einer Stahllegierung als Werkstoff zur Herstellung von Ventilkegeln
DE1124068B *Aug 2, 1956Feb 22, 1962Teves Kg AlfredVerwendung einer Stahllegierung als Werkstoff zur Herstellung von Ventilkegeln
DE1124069B *Mar 11, 1958Feb 22, 1962Int Harvester CoDie Verwendung einer Stahllegierung fuer Ventile in Verbrennungskraftmaschinen
DE102011081482A1 *Aug 24, 2011Feb 28, 2013Mahle International GmbhAnnealed ferritic material useful for valve seat rings and turbocharger components, comprises carbon, chromium, molybdenum, vanadium, silicon, manganese, iron, production-related impurities and other elements
Classifications
U.S. Classification148/325, 148/607, 420/12, 148/326, 123/188.3, 407/119, 148/327
International ClassificationC22C38/34, C22C38/22, C22C38/44
Cooperative ClassificationC22C38/34, C22C38/22, C22C38/44
European ClassificationC22C38/44, C22C38/22, C22C38/34