Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2051931 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 25, 1936
Filing dateMay 21, 1936
Priority dateMar 17, 1936
Publication numberUS 2051931 A, US 2051931A, US-A-2051931, US2051931 A, US2051931A
InventorsErrett Stanley E, Reid John L
Original AssigneeErrett Stanley E, Reid John L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drainage rack
US 2051931 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 25, 1936.

S. E. ERRETT El AL DRAINAGERACK Filed May 21, '1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 25,19 6. s. E. ERRETT ml. 2,051,931

DRAINAGE RACK Filed May 21, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Aug. 25, 1936 UNITED STATES DRAINAGE RACK Stanley E. Errett and John L. Reid, Prescott, Ontario, Canada Application May 21, 1936, Serial No. 81,120 In Canada March 17, 1936 8 Claims.

This invention relates to drainage racks, and is particularly designed and will be here shown and described for draining oil cans commonly used as containers for lubricating oil for motors.

It is the common practice under the present methods of distribution to punch the top of the can containing the lubricating oil and pour the contents into the splash pan or other oil distributing system of the motor. The amount of oil in each individual can which does not drain to the oil system of the motor is small, but in the aggregate the residue which does not readily drain from the cans is considerable.

The present rack is intended to furnish a' convenient and efiicient means for collecting and saving the undrained oil from the cans after the bulk of the oil, and all that will readily drain into the motor, has been poured out.

In the drawings herewith are shown two embodiments of the invention, although it will be understood that mechanical variations from the structures here shown may be made without departing from the range of the invention.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a view in side elevation of a rack embodying the invention, the position of the cans to be drained being indicated in dotted lines.

Figure 2 is an end view looking from the right of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a view in cross section substantially on the line 3 3 of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a view in side elevation of a slightly difierent form of rack.

Figure 5 is an end view looking from the left of Figure 1, and

Figure 6 is a view in cross section substantially on the line 66 of Figure 4.

Referring to the drawings by numbers, like numbers indicating like parts in the several views, and having reference to Figures 1, 2, and 3, l0 indicates vertical supports or legs, two of which are here shown, and these may be of the one-piece formation shown, being bent at their middles to give the rounded top II, as shown.

These end supports form stable supports, the leg portions l0 being spread, as shown, so as to insure steadiness of the rack and guard against accidental upsetting.

The upper portions of the end members described are connected by longitudinal bars l2 and 23 of suitable gauge and thickness to give proper rigidity, being secured in any suitable manner, as by rivets or bolts, the bar l2 being positioned above the bar l3 as shown, so as to form supporting means for the cans, illustrated and its side on the bar in dotted lines in Figures 1 and 3. It will be seen that the bar l2 furnishes a rest for the side of the can, while the bar l3 supports the end of the can so that the can will be held in the draining position showh in Figure 3.

The legs In of the end supports are connected by transverse struts l4 and I5 which are vertically offset so that one will be lower than the other, and these struts are provided with troughholding means, here shown as the V-shaped 10 members 16. v

The struts l4 and I5 and their trough supporting members I6 serve to support a trough I] of any desired shape in cross section, here shown as triangular, and by reason of the vertically oiif- 1 set position of the struts I4 and IS, the trough I! will be held in an inclined draining position. The support l6 for the trough will be spaced in such relation to the can supporting bars l2 and I3 and the cans held thereby that the punched opening of the can will be brought directly over the trough and all drainage from the cans will escape into the trough [1 down which the drainings will flow and be delivered at the open end H! of the trough and thence to any suitable receptacle, shown in dotted lines. Preferably the upper end I9 of the trough will be closed so that there could be no overflow or drip from that end.

In Figure 3, two forms of cans are shown in dotted lines. The large can will occupy the position shown, with its end resting on the bar !3 l2. If the can to be drained is so small that it cannot be brought into proper position relative to the trough 61,

if its end rests upon the bar I 3, it will take the position shown in Figure 3 with its side resting against the bar l2 and its end supported by the edge of the trough I! so that its drainage opening will be brought over the trough.

In the form of the invention shown in Figures I 4, 5, and 6, there is a slight modification of the end members.

The end members have the leg portions 20 similar to the form just described, and are preferably formed of one piece bent at its middle but having also reentrant bends 2| and 22 to form trough supports. The bend 2| to form one of the trough supports is dropped below and offset from the bend 22 forming the other trough support, so as to provide for proper drainage inclination of the trough 23 which is identical in construction with the trough heretofore described.

The longitudinal bars 24 and 25 will be secured to the upper ends or the end supports 20 in the 5 offset relation shown so that the can shown in dotted lines in Figure 6 will be positioned with its punched opening over the drainage trough 23. The action of draining and collecting in the inclined trough and delivering to any suitable receptacle will be the same as heretofore described.

If desired, the rack can be further braced by additional longitudinal bars 26 shown in Figures 4, 5, and 6. v

The disclosure herein is descriptive and in no sense restrictive of the invention, as changes in structure may be made within the skill of the mechanic and still remain within the purview of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A drainage rack comprising vertical end supports, means extending longitudinally between said end supports to engage the side and end of the receptacle to be drained and support it in an inclined position, transverse members connecting said end supports and vertically offset from each other, and a trough mounted on said transverse members and positioned to receive drip from the drain opening in the inclined can.

2. A drainage rack comprising vertical end supports, longitudinally disposed bars connecting said end supports and vertically offset from each other to engage'and support the receptacle to be drained with the drain opening between said long'itudinally disposed bars, transverse members connecting said end supports and vertically ofiset from each other, and a trough, mounted on said transverse members and positioned to receive drip from the drain opening in the can.

3. A drainage rack comprising vertical end supports, longitudinally disposed bars connecting said end supports and vertically offset from each other to engage and support the receptacle to be drained in an inclined draining position with the drain opening between said longitudinally disposed bars, transverse members, connecting said end supports and vertically ofiset from each other, and a trough mounted on said transverse members and positioned to receive drip from the drain opening in the inclined can.

4. A drainage rack comprising vertical end supports, longitudinally disposed bars connecting said end supports and vertically offset from each other to engage the side and end of the rec ptacle to be drained with the drain opening between said longitudinally disposed bars, transverse members connecting said end supports and -vertically ofiset from each other, said transverse members being disposed below said longitudinally disposed bars, and a trough removably mounted on said transverse members and positioned to receive drip from the drain opening in the can.

5. A drainage rack comprising vertical end supports, longitudinally disposed bars connecting said end supports and vertically offset from each other to engage the side and end of the receptacle to be drained and hold it in an inclined draining position with the drain opening between said longitudinally disposed bars, transverse members connecting said end supports and vertically offset from each other, said transverse members {being disposed below said longitudinally disposedbars, and a trough removably mounted on said t ansverse members and positioned to receive dripfrom the drain opening in the can.

6. A drainage rack comprising vertical end supports, longitudinally disposed bars connecting said end supports and vertically offset from each other to engage and support the receptacle to be drained in an inclined position with the drain opening between said longitudinally disposed bars, transverse members connecting said end supports and vertically ofiset from each other, trough positioning and holding means on said transverse members, and a trough mounted on said holding and positioning means to receive drip from the drain opening in the inclined can.

7. A drainage rack comprising vertical end supports each bent inwardly and downwardly at its middle to provide transverse trough supporting members vertically offset from each other, longitudinally disposed bars connecting said end supports and vertically offset from each other to engage and support the repectacle to be drained in an inclined draining position with the drain opening between said longitudinally disposed bars, and a trough mounted on said transverse supporting members and positioned to receive drip from the drain opening in the inclined can.

8. A drainage rack comprising vertical end supports each bent inwardly and downwardly at its middle to provide open-topped transverse trough supporting members vertically offset from each other, longitudinally disposed bars connecting said end supports and vertically offset from each other to engage and support the receptacle to be drained in an inclined draining position with the drain opening between said longitudinally disposed bars, and a trough mounted on said transverse supporting members and positioned to receive drip from the drain openingin the inclined can.

STANLEY E. ERRETI'. JOHN L. Rum,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2587779 *Mar 8, 1946Mar 4, 1952Fred Smith MikeOil can drain rack
US7846330 *Mar 19, 2008Dec 7, 2010Nelson Keith AOil filter drain tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/85.25, 211/182
International ClassificationA47B81/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B81/007
European ClassificationA47B81/00E