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Publication numberUS2052541 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 25, 1936
Filing dateDec 12, 1933
Priority dateDec 12, 1933
Publication numberUS 2052541 A, US 2052541A, US-A-2052541, US2052541 A, US2052541A
InventorsIllig George D, Roberts Frederick W
Original AssigneeNiagara County Nat Bank & Trus
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Core for paper rolls
US 2052541 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ug- 25, 1936. FL w. ROBERTS ET'AL 2,052,54l

CORE FOR PAPER ROLLS Filed Dec. 12, 193s 2 sheets-sheet 1 @f AZ.

F. w. ROBERTS Er Al. 2,052,541

CORE FOR PAPER ROLLS Filed Dec. 12, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 wk@ w1 ,NRTJ

Ysame Vto and from the paper mill would result Patented ug. 25, Y 1936 UNHTE STATES:

PATENT OFFICE com: Fon PAPER RoLLs pany, Lockport, N. Y.

Application December 12, 1933, serial No. 701,992

13 Claims.

:nism of a paper mill and the unwinding mechanism on a printing press.` These cores were used mainly because of their relatively light Weight so that the cost of shipping cores back and forth between thepaper mill andthe printing :establishment is reduced to a minimum. These paper cores, however, are objectionable since they are comparatively fragile so that considerable expense is necessary for the repairing and replacing of these cores, and furthermore, these paper Cores are not rigid enough to maintain their shapes so that apparently the paper is not evenly or tightly-wound thereon, and after most of the paper has-been unwound from a roll, the remainder of the paper must be rewound on another core before it can be used in the printing press, since slack winding of the paper on the core renders it impossible to use this slack paper on the printing presses.

Tubular metal cores in the form of pipes or tubes of uniform thickness throughout have also heretofore been employed within the paper mills themselves where the paper is rewound from such core in the mill itself so that transportation costs do not enter into the problem. Such cores, however, are so heavy that the shipping of the in prohibitive cost of transportation.

The objects of this invention are to construct a. composite core made mainly of relatively thin metal and having a substantially uniform outside diameter for engagement with the paper at the interior of the roll and provided with reinforcing means at the opposite ends thereof; also to provide cores of thiskind which are so constructed as to be capable of cooperating with increase-d strength and durability without materially increasing the weight of the core beyond the weight of paper cores now in use; also to provide a core of this kind having certain deformations on the surface thereof which reinforce the thin metal portion of the core and at the same time facilitate the starting of the winding of the paper on the core; also to provide a core of this kind with means for readily repairing damaged portions of cores or for increasing or decreasing the length of cores; also to provide means for repairing or changing the length of cores which cooperate with the defor.-

mations on the core toform a secure joint; also to provide a core of this kind with a. helical groove which reinforces the core and facilitates the winding of the paper thereon, and which makes it possible to provide a threaded engagement with parts that may be used for repairing or changing the length of cores; also to provide an improved method and apparatus for manufacturing cores of the kind described; also to improve cores of this kind in other respects hereinafter specified.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a view, partly broken away, of a core for use on paper rolls and embodying this invention.

Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional View thereof, on line 2-2, Fig. 4.

Figs. 3 Vand 4 are fragmentary central longitudinal sectional views of the end of the core showing two steps in the operation of making the core.

Figs. 5 and 6 are longitudinal views of a core provided with means for repairing or changing the length of cores.

Fig. 7 is a longitudinal view of an inserted or inner member for use in repairing or changing the length of cores.

Fig. 8 is a longitudinal sectional view of the portion of the core, on an enlarged scale, hav-V ing an insert therein for repairing or changing the length of a core.

The core is made of a thin metal body portion A, which extends throughout the length of the core and which may be formed of seamless tubing or of sheet metal welded or otherwise formed into a tube. The ends of the core are provided with suitable reinforcing portions of materially greater thickness, and in the construction shown by way of example, the reinforcement of the ends is effected by means of sleeves or collars B which are preferably made of steel or other hardv and durable material. These collars are preferably made of such thickness that the inner face of each collar will cooperate with the arbors commonly employed in connection with the Winding or unwinding of the paper cores. In the particular construction shown, the collars are arranged on the interior o'f the cores, andare secured in correct relation to the ends of the core by means of spot Welding, as indicated at b. It will be obvious that any means for securing the collars to the ends of the cores may be employed, and that, if desired, the ends of the cores may be contracted or reduced in diameter so that thecollars can be secured to the outer surfaces of the endsnofI the cores. The collars, however, must'be sosecured tothe tubes A that the core Will' be of uniform diameter throughout its length.

The cores must be of a length equal to the width of the paper wound on the same, and consequently, the length of the cores should be accurately controlled.v We, consequently,"provide I neans for `accurately spacing the collars B ,relatively to yeach other and after the collars are welded in'place as vshown in Fig. 3, the ends of the tube A extending beyond the collars are turnd'fover'fas indicated -l in Fig. 4. By this arrangement, slightdiiferences since the. ends are turned over lso that differences in length do not affect the lengthr of `the cores.

After the collars have beensecured to cores and the -ends of the cores turned over, a key notch or recess'C is preferably cutinr one orboth ends of the core for forming a driving connection with a winding or unwinding mechanism; Preferably two of the spot welded connections between the collar and the tube A are arranged so that Aone is at each side of the cut-out portion C v While it is possible under some. conditions to use a core with asmooth orl unbroken. cylindrical surface from ,end to end thereof,yyet We have found that greatly improved results are obtained if the metal tube or shell A ofgthe core is providedwith more or less. regular deformations or grooves, for the purposes ofV reinforcing, the core, truingithe same, and facilitating adhesion of the paper thereto during the start of the. winding. Such grooves vor deformations Ymay be of any suitable or desired form, but should not v,be ,of a form to extend outwardly beyond the diameter of the core. Longitudinal grooves may be employed `or grooves extending partly or entirely around the core.; We have foundV that v ery satisfactory results can be obtained by using agspiral groove D which extends throughout the greater portion of the length of the core terminating short of the portionsv of the core on which the collars or sleeves B are secured. Such. grooveD maiyybe of any suitable or desired cross sectionaly area, but preferably the grooveis formed in such away that it is not excessively wide lacross the outer face thereof. The spiral groove has a decided strengthening effect upon thencore, and when starting tro-wind a sheet ofpaper o n Ythencore the tension of kthe paper causes the same to pulll slightlyhinto the groove and thus adhere lrmly'to theface of the core.

InV cores of this kind as heretofore made of paper, it was only possible to repair cores, if the damaged .part was located near the endl of the core, in which case the core could be shortened for use on smaller rolls of paper,.fby cutting off the damaged partV and placing a'metal reinforcement on the end ofthe core thus formed. With our improved core, it is possible to 4repair damaged parts occurring on any portion ofthe core, and it is also possible to remove a damaged portion of a core and substitute for it a new part so that the repaired core will be ofthe same length as the original core.. The. manner in Vwhich. this can be effected is shown in Figs. 5-8 inclusive, in which the'tube A of the core can be cut at any portion thereof intermediate 'of the vendsv andthe i, threads and thus threading the inner member E *into place within the outermember A until the inner or repair member overlaps both meeting core can then be repaired by placing an inner member or insert E'into the core. This inner member is preferably of an outer diameter very slightly less than the inner diameter of the tube A of the core, and is also provided with a groove 5 or grooves F formed to correspond with the groove or grooves formedin the tube A. If spiral grooves are employed, the inner member can be secured within the tube A by usingthe groovesas screw ends of the outer tube A. It is'also possible to cut a piece of outer tubing similar to the outer tube A of the desired length, Yeither to replace a damaged part from a core or to lengthen the core `t`o the desired extent, and a part G for this purpose is shownin Fig.; 5. In this case, the insert member E is made of sufficient length so that when the spacing member G has been threaded in place 20 thereon, the ends of the insert member E will extend `into the opposite ends of the tube A to a sufcient extent to form a rigid connection there- Y with. Y

Any suitable means may be employed to rigidly securethe parts together. In the particular construction shown, this can be very easilyY ac` compl-ished by providing the inner member E with grooves or slots I-I arranged at intervals around the periphery of the inner member and any tubular portionrof the core can then be interlockedY` with the inner member E by bending inwardly a tongue o r lip cut from any portion of the outer tube adjacent to an end thereof, which can be easily done by a chisel or other implement such lips being shown at` i5 in Fig. 8. These lips co operate with the spiral grooves to securely hold the telescoping tubular parts inrengagement byY preventing turning of the tubular parts relatively V to each other.y By providing a series of these slots at intervals around the peripheryas shown in Fig. 7, it is always possible to nd a slot which either occurs at abutting endsof two outer tubular portions, or which can be placed atsuch abutting ends by a slight turning of the inner telescoping tube E. Any other means for forming a connection between tubular parts of the-core may, however, be employed, if desired.

In Fig. 6 is shown a core in which a somewhat shorter inner member E is employed', as may be the case if no spacingy portion G is used, as may for exampleY be the case if a damaged portion of thetube isrcut outwithout replacing such darnagedvportion by a tubular part, thus producing a shorter core, orvthe construction shown in Fig. 6 may be used,.if it is desired to shorten a longer core. In this case, the two cut ends of the tube A are placed into engagement Ywith the inner member E', and lips or tongues li 5 are then forced through apertures or slits in the insert or repair member E. If it is desired to lengthen the core, it is merely necessary to cut the same crosswise and insert a member corresponding to the spacing member G 'of the desired length and then securing the parts together as shown in Figs. 5Y and 8. .Y

It is also possible in connection with our improved core toA repeatedly change the length of cores, this being easily done vby bending backwardly the llips or tongues I5 so that the parts of the core can again be separated by unscrewing'.. Arepairpart similar to the part G of differentV length can then be secured in place t form'cores of the desired length. In paper mills Ywhere a larger number of cores are used, it is of great` MY importance to be able to;.change :.the'length of cores, if the width of thesheets requiredby the consumeris changed. l. f'-

If theV cores aremadewithout grooves; or with grooves of different shape or form, it will be obvious that thetelescoping Vinner member canv be changed to correspond' to the shape of the cylindrical :body portion' of the core. [Other means for securing the 'inner and outer tubes together can, of course, be used. y The repair means described are simple and easy tov use and repairs or changes of length of tuhesIcan easily be made i-n a .paper mill or Vplant equipped with only 'a few simple tools. Y f l The .provision of the spiral groovevin the tube results `in the truing of the tube, `since after welding or .other operations on the tubes, some of these tubes .are sometimes slightly elliptical in cross section 'instead of being 'ftruly circular, but we have found that-:after 'a tubey `has been provided with a spiral-groove, the tubes Aare of uniformly truly` circular cross sectional shape. The forming of a' groove in -avtube also has a 'tendency' .toV harden the metal, land the groove changes the cross section of the metal sufficientlyto produce fa reinforcing eifect. The tubes :thus formed, even though made of comparatively thin material, arevwell able to fstand thestrains to which they may be subjected in their ordinary use or during shipping, and are veryV much sturdier and last much longer than paper tubes heretofore used. f

Cores made of thin sheet body tubes with reinforcingrsleeves in the ends thereof Vin'accordance with this invention have the important advantages that they are absolutely of uniform length and are not -subject to change of length due to weather conditions or endwise pressure applied by winding or unwinding mechanisms; as isthe case with paper cores. Furthermore, these tubes are of truly cylindrical outer contour so-that slackwin'ding di paper Ais eliminated and in the'case `ofcores of 'this kind in actual use, all but the last four or five turns of paper on the core could be used in the printing presses because of the rm adhesion of the paper to the core. The cores therefore reduce to a minimum the core waste which the printers or publishers have heretofore encountered with paper cores. Owing to the sturdy nature of these cores, much less repair work is necessary on the same than in connection with paper cores, and the shipping cost of cores of this kind is in some cases equal to that of paper cores, or only very slightly in excess of the shipping cost of paper cores.

Wevclaim as our invention:

1. A core for a paper roll for use in paper mills 'and on printing presses, including a cylindrical,

single-walled body portion of relatively thin metal, reinforcing members secured to the ends of said body portions, the interior of said cylindrical body portion between said reinforcing members being substantially unobstructed, from end to end, a driving recess in a reinforcing member, and a helical groove depressed into the outer surface of said body portion and terminating at said reinforcing members, said groove deforming a relatively small portion of the cylindrical surface of said core, leaving the remainder of said cylindrical'surface undeformed.

2. A core for a paper roll including a cylindrical, single-walled body portion made of thin sheet metal, reinforcing sleeves of greater length than radial thickness secured in said body portion at a slight distance from the ends thereof, the ends displacementof that sleeve 4along the body por` tion.

3. A core for. a paper roll including a singlewalled cylindrical body portion of thin metal open fromend toend and having a helical grooveA extending approximately-f-rom end to end and spun'into Aits outer .surface to .form an internal helicalrib, fsaitl body portion being cut transverselyof Aits length into a plurality of sections, a short .inner tube of v:suii'icient length to extend into the'end portions 'of each section and also provided with a helicalrgroove .adapted for a threaded engagement with the helicalrib on the interior ofthe body portion, and means, for positively lockingsaid inner tube against turning relatively toboth ofsaid sections, to Aprevent separation of the sections. 4. A core for .a paper roll including ya rbody portion `of thin metal and comprising two sections, an inner tubular vmember of :slightly smaller diameter than `the inner diameter of said 'body portion and adapted to telescope into the vopposite ends of said sections, a 'third section of tubing of the same diameter as said body portion and through which said inner tubular member may extend with'its opposite ends projecting beyond .the ends of said third section and which third lsection abuts against adjacent ends of the sections of said body portion when said opposite ends of saidrinner tubular member are telescoped into the ends of said body portion sections, and means for securing said'inner tube to the sections of said body portion.A i y l A 5. A core for a paper roll including a' body portion of thin' metal and provi-ded with reinforcing grooves and cut transversely of its length intermediateA of -itsends, anV inner tubular member adapted to 1fit into adjacent out-ends andprovidedwithgrooves adapted to engage with the grooves in said body portion, and a spacing member around said inner tube and adapted to abut against the out ends of said body portion.

6. A core for a paper roll including a body portion of thin metal and provided with reinforcing grooves and cut transversely of its length intermediate of its ends, an inner tubular member adapted to t into adjacent cut ends and provided with grooves adapted to engage with the grooves in said body portion, and a spacing member around said inner tube and adapted to abut against the cut ends of said body portion, said spacing member also being provided with grooves similar to the grooves in said body portion and cooperating with the grooves in said inner member to hold said spacing member against rotation relatively to said body portion and inner member.

'7. A core for a paper roll including a body portion of thin metal having a spiral groove formed therein and out transversely of its length intermediate of its ends into two sections, an inner tubular member adapted to fit into the adjacent cut ends of said body portion and provided with a spiral groove adapted to have a threaded engagement with the spiral groove of said body portion, a spacing member arranged about said inner member and abutting against the cut ends of said body portion, and means for locking said inner member to the two sections of said body portion.

8. A core for a paper roll including a body por- Y form and a lesser portion tion of thin metal having a spiral groove formed therein and cut transversely of its length intermediate of its ends into two sections, an inner tubular member adapted tot into the adjacent cut ends of said body portion and provided with a spiral groove adapted to have a threaded engagement with the spiral groove ofV said body portion, a spacing member arranged about said inner member and abutting against the cut ends of said body portion, said spacing member being provided with a spiral groove'corresponding to c thev groove in said body portion and engaging with the groove of said innerV member, and means for securing said inner member against rotation relatively to .both sections Vof said body portion 9. A core for a paper roll for use in paper mills and on printingl presses and comprising a singlewalled pipe-like unitary body of thin metal coextensive with the vlength of the roll, and reinforcing rings of greater axial lengththan radial thickness and of a diameterA not greater than the outside-diameter of said body and secured in telescoping relation tothe opposite ends of said body, the interior. of `said pipe-like body between said rings beingopen from end to end, said pipe-like body having a portion of its outside surface grooved at a plurality of zones that are substantially separated by ungrooved zones by which a paper sheet Wound on said core will be caused by the grooved zones, to grip the core and will be held by the ungrooved zones against substantial deformation in a direction normal to the faces of the sheet. c, k

10. A core for a paper roll for use in paper mills and, on printingpresses and comprising a singlewalled pipe-like unitary body of thin metal coextensive with the length of the roll, and reinforcing rings secured to the ends of said body, said'body having a helical grooveformed in its outer surface progressing ,approximately from end to end, the greater portion of the outer surfaceof the core being of undeformed cylindrical thereof being deformed by said groove.- I f 11. A core for a paper vroll for `use inpaper mills and on printing presses and comprising a single-walled pipe-like unitary body of thin metal coextensive with the length of the roll, and reinforcing rings'ofsubstantial axial` length secured to the ends of said body, said body being provided with a groove formed, therein' and progressing helically from end to end, said helical groove being of such pitch as toleave theY greater portion` of said core of undeformed cylindrical shape.

l2. A core for a paper roll for use in paper mills and on printing presses and comprising a, single-y walled pipe-like unitary body of thin metal ,cow

extensive with the length of the roll and formed in two sections abutting end to end, each-section having a helical groove spun `into thewall thereof and progressing approximately from end'to end of thev core, anrinner tubular member of slightly smaller diameter than the inner diameter of said body and adapted 'to telescope'into the abutting ends of said sections and having a helical groove of the same size and pitch as saidsections and which threads with the spun' groove of the said sections, the interior of said core vbeing substantially unobstructed, means for securing said inner member to both sections of `said body,` and reinforcing rings of substantial axial length', telescoping with and attached to the ends of said body. Y

FREDERICK W. ROBERTS. GEORGED. ILLLG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2670041 *Mar 11, 1949Feb 23, 1954Derby Sealers IncTape-dispensing mechanism with knife-guarding means
US5340050 *Apr 20, 1993Aug 23, 1994Sonoco Products CompanyTubular core assembly having inside-diameter reducing end members secured by mechanical interlocking member
US5393010 *Apr 20, 1993Feb 28, 1995Sonoco Products CompanyTubular core assembly for winding paper and other sheet material having mechancially interlocked end members
US5469619 *Apr 21, 1994Nov 28, 1995Sonoco Products CompanyTubular core assembly having inside-diameter reducing end members secured by mechanical interlocking member
US8523719Sep 19, 2006Sep 3, 2013Billy OlsonHelical tensioner for tension members
US9355758Jul 11, 2013May 31, 2016Billy OlsonHelical tensioner for tension members
US20060043234 *Aug 31, 2004Mar 2, 2006Hui-Ling ChenSeamless paper reel
US20150136894 *Jul 2, 2012May 21, 2015Sca Hygiene Products AbCore member for an absorbent sheet roll
DE1218736B *Jul 21, 1960Jun 8, 1966AmpexBandlaengenmessgeraet
EP2113479A3 *Apr 23, 2009Jan 27, 2010Voith Patent GmbHMethod for conveying a continuous strip of material and coiling machine for carrying out the method
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/609.4, 492/35, 242/613.5
International ClassificationB65H75/04, B65H75/10
Cooperative ClassificationB65H75/10
European ClassificationB65H75/10