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Publication numberUS2053803 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1936
Filing dateJul 3, 1931
Priority dateJul 3, 1931
Publication numberUS 2053803 A, US 2053803A, US-A-2053803, US2053803 A, US2053803A
InventorsSchweller Edmund F
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerating apparatus
US 2053803 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

4 Sheets-Sheet l .uvms` WQNKK. llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll .i

z 58 y s l EgTR Z will@ ATTORNEYS E. F. SCHWELLER REFRIGE'RATING APPARATUS Original Filed July 5, 1951 1 i BY sept. s, 1936.

Sept. 8, 1936 E. F. scHwELLl-:R 2,053,803

REFRIAGRATING APPARATUS Original Filed July 5, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 BY ATTORNEYS Sept 8, 1936- E. F. SCHWELLER 2,053,803

REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Original Filed July 5, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 y ZZ 22 L l J 2 BY Ll/ENTR Sept 8, 1935- E. F. scHwELLER 2,053,803

REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Original Filed July 5, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 85 I I "i I l 2: [I .EN o

' BY ATTORNEYS Patented Sept. A8, 1936 'I UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE BEFRIGERATING APPARATUS Edmund F. Schweller, Dayton, Ohio, assignor, by

mesne assignments, to General Motors-Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Application July 3, 1931, Serial No. 548.58 Renewed December 6, 1933 f 15 Claims. (Cl.v 220-9) This invention relates to refrigerating apframes, each frame dening an air space lined paratus and more particularly to heat insulated at least in part with sheets of foil; to provide cabinet construction. means for preventing transfer of heat from one In the manufacture of insulated cabinets, it frame to another; to seal each air space to therehas been proposed to use air spaces in the walls by prevent the ingress of moisture to the spaces 5 thereof to prevent the transfer of heat therebetween the foil; and to provide constructions of through. Heretofore such practice hasbeen uninsulated cabinets easy and economical to handle satisfactory for the reason that radiant heat will in large scale production. pass freely through air, and, in addition, the Further objects and advantages of thepresconvection currents set up therein will transfer ent invention will be apparent from the follow- 10 large amounts of heat therethrough. To overing description, reference being had to the accome the transfer of radiant heat it has been companying drawings, wherein a preferred form proposed to provide a dead air space bounded by of the present invention is clearly shown.

a thin bright metal foil or-leaf. such for instance In the drawings:

l5 as bright aluminum foil. By the term metal foil Fig. l is a vertical sectional view along the l5 is meant thin leaves of metal either with or line I-I ofv Fig. 3 embodying one form of the without paper backing of such thickness that invention; they can be readily formed to any desired shape. Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view of a portion of It has been found that these bright metallic surtheeabinet aleng the line 2-2 0f Fig. 3;

faces of foil radiate but very little heat, and Fig. 3 iS a Sectional VieW along the line 3-3 2o consequently it is possible to utilize air spaces 0f Fig- 2;

lined with such bright surfaces in heat insulating Fig. 4 iS avertieal SeCtiOnal View 0f a Dertien cabinets. of a refrigerator cabinet disclosing a modified Attempts to adapt such thin bright metallic ferm 0f the invention: foil to cabinet constructlonso as to utilize air Fig. 5 iS an enlarged VieW 0f an upper C01ne1 25 spaces in the walls thereof for insulating pur- 0f Fig- 4; i poses have met with great diculty. In the Fig- 6 iS a perspective View 0f One 0f the nrst place, this foil is extremely thin and conseframes together With a Set 0f` Spacing bleCkS quently must be so constructed as to prevent ShOWn in Figs. 4 and 5;

3o rupturing of the foil when such cabinets are Fig. 7isamodified form of frame construction; 30

subjected to the slam test, a test involving the Fig- 8 iS anQihel modified forni 0f 30nopening and closing of the cabinet door over SirllCtOn SOIneWhai; Similar t0 Figs. 4 andi 5; prolonged periods of time. In addition, the foil Fig- 9 iS a'SeetiOnal View along the line 9--9 musi; be so supported Within the cabinet wall as of Fig. 10 of a modified form of frame constructo maintain it substantially taut at all times, tien employing reinforced cardboard; and 35 while at the same time preventing the transfer Fig. 10 is a sectional view along the line Illl0 cf heat through these supporting means. Third- 0f Fig 9- ly, care should be taken to prevent the entrance In Order i0 illusiraie'one aspect 0f my invenof humid air inl-,o the air spaees boundedv by tion, I have disclosed in Figs. 1 to 3 inclusive a 4o sheets of foil, otherwise the moisture therein refrigerator cabinet generally designated as 20. 40 condenses upon the sheets of bright metallic foil. This Cabinet includes a 10Wer machinery com- This may cause the foil to tarnish and to lose pariment '2| formed by the upright Cerner memsome of its reflecting properties which make it bers 22 and horizontal cross members 23. 'I'he particularly valuable for insulating purposes food storage compartment 24 is located in the It is to such structure that my invention par- Upper Dertien 0f the Cabnet- This feed Storage 45 ticularly relates, having for one of its objects to compartment is preferably but not necessarily enprovide a cabinet construction having foil insu- Closed Within a One-Piece metal liner 01' inner lation, that is, a cabinet capable of utilizing a Wall 25. This lining has its front edges securedthin bright metauic foil to advantage, while at t0 horizontal c rOSS beams 21 and Similar upright the same time eliminating Ymost of its disadvanmembers 28 forming a rectangular i091 lamb. 50 tages, A convenient way of securing the liner 25 to the More particularly, it is an object of the invendoor jamb iS Shown 0n the drawings Comprising tion to provide an improved cabinet construction nailing or otherwise securing the front edges the walls of which are composed of independent of the liner 25 to the rectangular door jamb and panels, each panel including a plurality of then securing over the ledges thereof a wooden 55 moulding 30 having a relatively low conductivity.

This moulding 30 serves to break the conduction of heat from the exterior of the cabinet to the inner liner 25.

Sheets of metal form the outer walls of the cabinet. 'I'he sheet metal member 3iv is provided for covering the rectangular door jamb. The parts 25, 3i, and 33 may be coated with porcelain and in this case chipboard 32 is placed beneath the sheet metal covering for preventing the chipping of the porcelain. A continuous strip of sheet metal covering 33 forms the top and rear outer walls of the cabinet. Over the sheet metal covering 33 a top covering 34 preferably coated with porcelain is provided. A sheet metal covering 35, protected by the chipboard 36, is provided on the side walls of the cabinet. Insulation is provided between theI inner and outer walls of the cabinet 20 and more strictly speaking between the inner liner 25 and the outer sheet metal covering 33 and 35. This construction preferably takes the form of a plurality of independent panels, performed before assembling and composed of a plurality of frames, each frame including an air space lined at least in part with this bright metal foil. For example, as shown in Figs. 1 to 3 inclusive, seven rectangular insulating panels, each formed of a plurality of rectangular wooden frames with sheets of bright metallic foil thereon, are provided for insulating the cabinet. The top insulating panel is designated generally by the reference character 40. The bottom insulating panel is designated in general by the reference character 4I. The rear insulating panel is generally designated by the reference character 42 while the side insulating panels are designatedby reference characters 43 and 44. These panels are similar in general construction. Taking the side panel 44 as an example of this construction, there is provided adjacent the inner liner 25 a rectangular wooden frame 46 -to which is attached on the inner side of this frame adjacent the liner 25 a sheet of heavy waterproof material 41 such as waterproof paper. On the other side of this rectangular wooden frame 46 there is attached a sheet of bright metallic foil 48. On the outer side of this sheet of bright metallic foil 48 is attached a second rectangular frame 49 similar to the rectangular wooden frame 46 and to the outer side of the rectangular wooden frame 49 is attached, preferably by a waterproof glue, a second sheet 50 of bright metallic foil similar to the sheet 48. At the outer side of the sheet of bright metallic foil 50 is another rectangular wooden frame 5I similar to the frames 46 and 49. This frame, as well as the frames 46 and 49, is preferably coated on both sides with a waterproof glue in assembling the panel. On the outer side of the rectangular wooden frame 5I is attached, by a suitable glue, another sheet of bright metallic foil 52. On the outside of the sheet 52 of bright metallic foil is a fourth rectangular wooden frame 53 which is attached to the sheet 52 of bright metallic foil by a suitable waterproof glue. 0n the outer side of the rectangular wooden frame 53 a corrugated sheet of paper 54 is attached by' a suitable waterproof glue. 'I'hese insulating panels are constructed separately as independent units before the assembly of the cabinet. The rectangular wooden frames of each panel are suitably attached together by nails or other means to form the insulating panel which'is easily handled and which is readily assembled into the cabinet. By this construction each air space is sealed.

In assembling the cabinet, the framework comprising the four corner uprights 22, connecting cross pieces 23, 31, 38, and parts of the door jamb 21 and 38 are first connected together into a unit. The inner liner 25, after being coated with porcelain, is then attached at its front edges to the top and side members 21 and 28 of the rectangular door jamb. The insulating panels are then placed against the outer side of the inner liner between the frame members and at the rear portions of the cabinet wooden or other non-conducting frame spacing members 56 are attached to the uprights 22 in order to hold the insulating panel 42 in proper position. Similarly the wooden or other non-conducting spacing members 51 are attached to the frame member 21 and the top frame member 38 is holding the insulating panel 40 in proper position. These insulating panels are preferably sealed on their outer faces by a suitable asphaltic substance 58, such as hydrolene, which is poured while hot over the cardboard sheets of the insulating panel and is particularly provided at the corners of the panel for sealing the insulating panels from moisture. This asphaltic substance solidies within a short time. The corrugated paper acts as an insulator to prevent the heat of the asphaltic substance from distorting the insulating panel or damaging the sheets of foil in any manner. If desired, any other suitable insulating sheet may be used instead of the corrugated paper. Also the corrugated paper may rst be suitably coated with a waterproofing substance before the assembling of the frame and after the panel is assembled into the cabinet, the hot asphaltic material need merely be poured around the edges of the panel so.

that these portions are also sealed to prevent moisture from entering the insulating panels. After this the outer walls of the cabinet are placed over the insulating panels.

The door 59 is Asimilarly insulated by providing rectangular wooden frames having sheets of bright metallic foil thereon and by waterproofing the inner and outer sheets of each panel. By such a construction, moisture is prevented from entering the air spaces provided between the sheets of foil and the sheets of foil are prevented from tarnishing. l

In Figs. 4, 5, and 6 a slightly modified form of construction, is shown. In Fig. 4 there is shown to lillustrate this form, the portion of. a refrigerator cabinet 1U having a machinery compartment ,1I in its lower portion and a food storage combers 13 and suitable connecting cross members 14.

Attached to the front upright member 13 and the horizontal connecting cross members 14 is a rec- -Itangular door jamb frame 15. To the irmer por- -tion of the door jamb frame 15 is attached the front edges of the inner liner `or wall 16 which surrounds the food storage compartment 12. This inner liner 16 is preferably, but not necessarily, made in one piece.

An outer lining or wall 11 surrounds the inner liner 16 but is spaced therefrom to provide an insulating space between the inner and outer lining. 'The rectangular attaching member 18 is attached to the rear side of the rectangular door jamb 15 and to this attaching member the front edges of the outer liner 11 is attached. This outer liner 11 may be made in one piece or, as

`1 shown in Fig. 4, may be made in two or more pieces.` In order to prevent the access of moisture to the insulating space it is necessary that liner be air-tight. Preferably these sheets of the outerliner may be joined together by a suitable soldering or welding operation. The front edges of both the inner and outer liners 18 and 11 are preferably sealed by suitable sealing compound as shown designated by reference characters 19 and 80.

Between the inner and outer liners or walls 16 and 11, insulating panels are provided. These rectangular frames: Sheets of bright metallic foil 83 are attached to both sides of the inner rectangular frames by a suitable waterproof glue and to the inner side of the outer rectangular frame of each of the insulating panels. 'Ihe frames are all stacked together and fastened by suitable means such as nails. In order to seal the outer perimeter of each of the frames, since the frames in this modification are spaced by the blocks 82, a strip of sealing paper or other suitable sealing substance-84 is attached by a suitable waterproof glue to the perimeter of each insulating panel. This encloses and seals each of the air spaces, preventing convection currents, and also preventing moisture from gaining access to the air spaces and the foil.` It will be seen by inspection of Figs. 4 and 5 that the innermost air space oil the back panel in the figures is directly adjacent the inner liner 18 of the food storage compartment 12 and that this air space, excepting for the rectangular baille members 85, extends to the outer wall of the cabinet. Should the rectangular baille member 85 not be present, heat would be easily transferred from the outer wall of the cabinet through this air space directly to the food storage compartment 12. By providing rectangular baille members between the sheets of the back panel, this direct transfer of heat is prevented and especially the convection of air in the innermost air spacedirectly from the inner liner 15 to the outer walls of the cabinet, is prevented. In this way a substantially dead air space prevents the direct transfer of heat from the air spaces adjacent the back wall of the inner liner 16 to the outer wall of the cabinet. 'I'he barile members 85 may be installed very easily during the assembly of the panel by using rectangularpanels formed of U-shaped strips of thin stiff cardboard, but -other forms of frames such as light wooden or other non-conducting frames may be used, if desired. For symmetry all of the spaces between the sheets of the back wall are provided with the rectangular bafe members. It will be under stood that only the several of the innermost air spaces actually require such baiiles since the outermost air spaces do not have a direct access to the inner liner 16 of the food storage compartment 12. A

The outer liner 11 is covered by galvanized sheet metal covering 89 at the rear of the cabinet, and the top and side portions of the outer liner are covered with the sheet metal covering 99. As in Figs. 1 to 3, the various liners may be porcelained and chipboard l |19 may be placed between the outer covering 99 and the inner liner 11 to prevent the porcelain from chipping. A similar construction is used in covering the door jamb 15. Chipboard lill is placed upon the outer side of the door jamb frame 15 and in a suitable sheet metal covering III, preferably coated with porcelain, is attached to the door jamb frame 15 over this chipboard. The sides of this covering extend to the inner walls of the door jamb frame 15 and a suitable moulding H2, of a material having a poor conductivity, is placed upon these inner walls so that it covers the front edges of the inner liner 16 and the edges of the outer covering III of the door jamb frame which extend into the inner walls of the door jamb frame 15.

The door H2 is similarly insulated. It is provided with a wooden frame H3 which is provided with a sheet metal covering Ill on its inner and outer sides. 'I'his covering is preferably coated with porcelain.- Between this sheet metal covering on the innerand outer sides of the door is a rectangular insulated panel I I5 which is similar to the panels between the inner and outer liners 16 and 11 of the other portions of the cabinet. In Fig. '1 there is shown a slightly modied form of insulating panels from that shown in Figs. 4, 5, and 6. In this form, excepting for the innermost top spacing block 86, the other members of the panel comprise rectangular frames 81 extending around the perimeter of the insulating panels. Sheets of bright metallic foil 88 are attached to the inner adjacent sides of the rectangular wooden frame members 81 and to the innermost side of the innermost frame member insulating panel shown in Fig. 7 by a suitable waterproof glue. The frame members 81 and the blocks 86 are attached together by suitable means such as nails.

In Fig. 8 another modification is shown. In this figure there is shown for the purposes of illustration an inner wall or liner 90 and an outer wall or liner 9| of an insulating cabinet. .These inner and outer walls aresealed in a suitable manner such as is shown in Fig. 4. Between the inner and outer walls'- 90 and 9| is provided an insulating panel 92. This insulating panel preferably comprises a pair 'of rectangular wooden frames 93 and 94. The'inner rectangular frame member 94 has sheets of bright metallic foil attached to both sides thereof and the outer frame member 93 has a sheet of bright metallic foil attached to its innermost side and a sheet of paper 96 attached to its outermost side. It has been found that three sheets of foil are suiiicient toA .similar to the wooden blocks 82, shown in Fig. 6,

and are preferably spaced from the inner and outer liners 90 and 9i by the blocks 98. By employing blocks for separating the frames from each other and from the walls of the cabinet, the heat leakage by conduction through the rectangular wooden frames is geratly reduced. If desired, the insulating panels shown in Fig. 8 may be provided with a sealing strip, similar to the sealing strip shown at 84 in Fig. 5, for sealing the air spaces between the sheets of foil.

In Figs. 9 and 10 another modification is shown. In this modification the rectangular frames forming the insulating panels are made of U- shaped pieces |09 of thin stiff cardboard which strips |02, better shown in Fig. 10 to make a corrugated cardboard frame. The sides of these rectangular cardboard frames are preferably attached at the corners by a suitable glue or paste, 5 but they may be attached by a. suitable clip4 or staple. The zigzag reinforcing strip |02 is preferably attached to the U-shaped cardboard frames by a suitable glue or staple. Sheets of bright metallic foil |03 are attached to the inner adjacent sides of the rectangular cardboard frame \members of the insulating panels shown in Figs. 9 and 10 and sheets of paper |04, preferably of the waterproof type, are placed upon the outer sides of the insulating panel and also around the i5 perimeter of the insulating panel. By placing sheets of strong waterproof paper on the outside of the insulating panel. moisture is prevented from getting into the panel and causing a failure of the cardboard frames and from causing tarnishing of the foil. The strong paper also aids in handling the insulating panels. A suitable sealing strip |05 is provided for sealing the air spaces between the sheets of foil.

In the modifications shown in Figs. 4 to 10, the panels are built up independently and as separate units and are assembled as units as described in connection with Figs. 1 to 3.

By employing an insulation in which the sheets of foil are placed upon frames which are made up into insulating panels for each side of the cabinet, the handling of the foil is greatly facilitated and then the foil can more easily be made by mass production methods. This also facilitates the assembling of the cabinet. 35 While the form of embodiment of the invention as herein disclosed, constitutes a preferred form. it is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

What is claimed is as follows:

1. An insulated storage cabinet including inner and outer walls, and insulating means between said inner and outer walls including a plurality of polygon frames, said frames having sheets of brightmetallic foil secured to the sides of said frames enclosing air spaces between the sheets of foil, said frames comprising U-shaped strips of cardboard having zigzag reinforcing strips therein.

2. An insulated storage cabinet including inner and outer walls, and insulating means between said inner and outer walls including a plurality of polygon frames, said frames having sheets of bright metallic foil secured to the sides of said frames enclosing air spaces between the sheets of foil and polygon bailies in the air spaces between said sheets.

3. An insulated storage cabinet including inner and outer walls and insulation between said inner and outer walls including a plurality of individual polygon frames, sheets of bright metallic foil upon Asaid frames, a plurality of small spacing blocks between said iframes for spacing said frames to provideair spaces between said sheets of foil, said frames being fastened together to form a panel, .anda sealing striparound the perimeter of said panel for preventing the access of moisture to thefexterior of said panel.

4. Anv insulated storage cabinet having inner and outer walls and insulating means between said inner and outer walls including a plurality of individual polygon frames, said frames having sheets oi' brightmetallic foil thereon, a plurality of small spacing blocks between said frames and a plurality of small spacing blocks on the outer sides of the outermost frames for spacing said frames from said inner and outer walls.

5. An insulated storage cabinet including inner and outer walls, means forming insulation cavities within said walls, means within said insulation cavities supporting a plurality of sheets of bright metallic foil in spaced relation providing a plurality of air spaces between said sheets of foil, a cover sheet having a relatively low conductivity fitting within one of said cavities and enclosing said sheets of foil within said cavity, and mearis forl sealing the joints between said cover sheet and the walls of the cavity.

6. An insulated storage cabinet including innen and outer walls, insulating means between said inner and outer walls including a plurality of frame members fastened together to form a panel,

' sheets of bright metallic foil b etween said frame members, a waterproof sheet sealed to one side of said panel, a sheet 'covering the other side of said panel, structural members between said inner and outer walls surrounding said panel and a viscous substance sealing the spaces between said panel and said structural members.

'7. An insulated storage cabinet including a plurality of structural members joined together to form a cabinet frame, inner and outer walls for the cabinet supported by said cabinet frame, and insulation between said inner and outer walls, said insulation comprising a plurality of insulating frames fastened together to form an insulating panel, sheets of bright metallic foil held between said insulating frames to enclose a plurality of air spaces within said panel, and a viscous substance sealing said panel to adjacent structural members.

8. An insulated storage cabinet including a plurality of structural members joined together to form a cabinet frame, inner and outer walls for the cabinet supported by said cabinet frame, and insulation between said inner and outer walls, said insulation comprising a plurality of insulating frames fastened together to form an insulating panel, sheets of bright metallic foil held between said'insulating frames to enclose a plurality of air spaces within said panel, a waterproof sheet sealed to one side of said panel, an insulat ing sheet on the opposite side of said panel and a viscous substance covering said insulating sheet and the spaces between the panel and adjacent structural members.

9. An insulated food storage cabinet including inner and outer walls, and insulating means between the inner and outer walls including an insulation panel having a plurality of polygon frames stacked together, said panel having sheets of bright metallic foil between the polygon frames, said sheets being held in spaced relation forming substantially dead air spaces therebetween, said panel having a sheet of corrugated cardboard on one side for protecting said bright metallic foil and for strengthening the panel. l

l0. An insulating structure including inner and outer walls and insulating means between the inner and outer walls including a plurality oi individual polygon frames having a plurality of sheets thereon, at least one of the sheets having a metallic heat reflecting surface, and a plurality of small spacing blocks for holding said frames and sheets in spaced relation with gas spaces therebetween.

11. An insulating structure including inner and outer walls and insulating means between the inner and outer walls including a plurality of individual polygon frames having a plurality of sheets thereon. at least one of the sheets having a metallic heat reecting surface, and a plurality of small spacing blocks for holding said frames spaced from one of the walls.

12. An insulation panel including a plurality of spaced sheets and a plurality of individual open frame structures between the sheets for holding the sheets in spaced relation with air spaces therebetween, said open frame structures coinprising corrugated sheet means with the flutes perpendicular to the spaced sheets and at sheet portions in contact with and fastened to the corrugated sheet members to form a relatively rigid spacing means.

13. An insulated structure including inner and outer walls for substantially enclosing a space to be insulated, said insulating means in' cluding a plurality of independent self-sustaining frames, each of said frames consisting of selfsustaining spacing members arranged in the shape of an unbroken perimeter of a polygon, said frames being superimposed on one another with the spacing members in alignment, flexible material having heat reflecting surfaces secured to said spacing members and enclosing air spaces therebetween, said superimposed frames being joined together forming an insulating panel, said joined together frames being provided with means constituting said spacing members as sealing means for preventing the ingress of air to the air spaces between the flexible material, said insulating panel being removable from and insertable into the space between the said walls as a unit.

14. An insulating structure including inner and outer walls for substantially enclosing a space to be insulated, insulating means between said walls, said insulating means including a plurality of independent self-sustaining frames arranged in the form of an unbroken perimeter of a polygon, s'aid'frames being superimposed one upon the other in alignment, flexible material having heat reflecting surfaces secured to and extending over the frames, said superimposed frames being joined together forming an insulating panel, said joined together frames being provided with means constituting sealing means for preventing the ingress of air to the air spaces between the flexible material, said insulating means being removable from and insertable into the space between the said walls as a unit.

15. An insulating structure including inner and outer walls for substantially enclosing a space to be insulated, insulating means between said walls, said insulating means including a plurality of independent self-sustaining frames, each of said frames consisting of self-sustaining spacing members arranged in the shape of an unbroken perimeter of a polygon, said frames being superimposed with the spacing members in alignment, exible material having heat reflecting surfaces secured to said spacing members and enclosing air spaces therebetween, said superimposed frames being joined together forming an insulating panel, the said spacing members cooperating with one another to close the spaces between the flexible material, and means cooperating with said spacing members for sealing the said spaces between the flexible material to prevent the ingress of air to said spaces, said insulating unit being removable from and insertable into the space between the walls as a unit.

EDMUND F. SCHWELIER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2427048 *Oct 22, 1943Sep 9, 1947Coolerator CompanySpaced wall heat insulated refrigerator cabinet
US2596316 *Dec 19, 1945May 13, 1952White Cabinet CorpRefrigerator
US5314087 *May 26, 1993May 24, 1994Radiant Technologies, Inc.Thermal reflective packaging system
US5638979 *May 24, 1994Jun 17, 1997Radiant Technologies, Inc.Thermal reflective packaging system
WO1994027871A1 *May 26, 1994Dec 8, 1994Radiant Technologies IncThermal reflective packaging system
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/592.11
International ClassificationF25D23/06
Cooperative ClassificationF25D23/063
European ClassificationF25D23/06B1