Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2053810 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1936
Filing dateMar 14, 1932
Priority dateMar 14, 1932
Publication numberUS 2053810 A, US 2053810A, US-A-2053810, US2053810 A, US2053810A
InventorsBisel Edwin J
Original AssigneeBisel Edwin J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Measuring apparatus
US 2053810 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 8, 1936. E. J. BISEL MEASURING APPARATUS 2 Shets-Sheet 1 Filed March 14 1332 n r n n I n ,I /I I I EEEV 4' it :I'

Sept. 8, 1936.

, E. J. BISEL MEASURING APPARATUS Filed March 14, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEY Patented Sept. 8, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 9 Claims.

This invention relates to measuring apparatus and, among other objects, aims to provide an improved device'for measuring a person, as in taking measurements for clothes. In the accompanying drawings showing a preferred embodiment of the invention,

Fig. 1 is a substantially isometric perspective view of the device;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view, taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. l, but drawn on an enlarged scale;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the device on the scale of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2 and drawn on. the scale of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a horizontal sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 3, but drawn on an enlarged scale; and

Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 1-1 of 'Fig. 6.

Referring particularly to the drawings, the improved apparatus is there shown as comprising generally a plurality of graduated bars which are slidablymounted on graduated standards, the arrangement being such that the front, rear and side profiles of a person may be readily measured. More specifically, the device is shown as comprising a rectangular base ID on which standards I I, I2 and [3 are mounted. The standards H and. I2 are spaced slightly apart and on opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of the base l0 at one end thereof. The standard I3 is located at the other or front end' of the base and in longitudinal alinement with standard II. All of the standards, which are preferably of metal, may be secured to the base by means of reduced portions 14 of the standards extending into sockets in the base and held by set screws I 5. The height of the standards is greater than that of a tall man and they are connected together at their upper ends by a brace l6 rigidly secured at one end between the standards H 'and' I2 and to the standard l3 at the other end. The standards are preferably noncircular in cross section, in this case being shown as square.

50 Slidably mounted between the standards II and I2 are a plurality of crossheads l1, l8 and I9, each having a snug sliding fit with the standards, as best shownin Fig. 6, and provided with guide flanges and 2| which permit only vertical movement of the crossheads. Slidably mount.-

ed for horizontal movement in the crossheads, and between the standards H and I2, are bars 22, 23 and 24 which are in substantial vertical alinement with the longitudinal axis of the base. The bars are all preferably made of flat metal 5 stock with their broad faces extending vertically and the outer ends of the bars are provided with handle portions, as shown, to facilitate adjustment of the bars when taking measurements.

The upper bar 22 is provided at its inner end with a horizontally curved cross bar 25 adapted to fit against the back of the neck or head of the person to be measured, thus providing a rest to steady that persons body. The intermediate bar is provided with a straight horizontal cross 15 bar 26 adapted to be engaged with various points on the back of the person. A crosshead 21 is slidably mounted on the standard l3 and carries a bar 28 having a cross bar 29 at its inner end, thus being adapted for engagement with the front of the person's body. The bar 28 is 9.1:- ranged on one side of the standard l3 so as to be substantially in the vertical plane of the bars 22, 23 and 24. I

Slidably mounted on opposite sides of the standards H and I2 are elongated slide members 30 and 3 l, to which are rigidly secured horizontal non-circular supporting arms 32, which extend at right angles to the bars 22, 23 and 24. In order to mount the slide members, flat metal strips 33 are secured to the opposite side faces of the standards II and I2, by countersunk bolts or the like, the strips extending full length of and being of greater width than the standards so as to present guiding flanges. The slide members 30 and 3| have flanges and are shaped to snugly fit the flanged guides 33, so as to permit only vertical movement. Each slide preferably has a handle at its upper end to facilitate raising and lowering operations. Slidably mounted on each arm 32 is a sleeve 35 to which is secured one end of 'a horizontal bar 36 which is parallel with the bars 22, 23 and 24, and has its free end extending toward the front of the apparatus.

In order to hold the crossheads l1, l8, l9-and 21 and the slide members 30 and 3| in vertically adjusted positions, the front and rear standards are provided, on their front and rear faces, respectively, with horizontal ratchet teeth 31, and each of the crossheads and slide members carries a pivoted pawl 38 adapted to engage in the teeth, as shown in Fig. '7; the arrangement being such that when the crossheads or slide members are raised, the pawls will ride over the teeth but will prevent lowering until the pawls are released manually by raising their free ends. The toothed faces of the standards are each preferably provided with a longitudinal groove, as shown in Fig. 2, to permit numbers to be stamped to indicate the height of the notches above the base. The teeth are preferably spaced a quarter of an inch apart and the numbers preferably are stamped at each inch mark, beginning at the bottom.

The bars 22, 23 and 28 are graduated beginning at the inner or cross bar end. The arms 32 are also graduated beginning at the end adjacent the slide members, the measurement being taken from the vertical axis between the stand ards H and I2. The bars 36 are also graduated beginning at the ends adjacent the sleeves. As the horizontal measurements at the rear of the apparatus must all be taken from the same vertical plane, the scales on the bars 22, 23 and 36 read from the inner faces'of the crossheads II, I8 and I9 and the slide members 30 and 3| respectively, all of which extend inwardly the same distance from the standards, as shown in Figs. 3 and 6. Similarly, the scale on bar 28 reads from the inner face of the crosshead 21.

In order to determine the heights of the various bars from the base, the several crossheads and slide members are provided with arrows 4D or other suitable indicating means, there preferably being two arrows on each member, one coincident with the top and the other with the bottom edge of each bar, as best shown in Fig. '7. Two arrows are provided because of the fact that some of the measurements are taken with the top and some with the bottom of the bars. For instance, the height of the shoulder would be determined from the bottom edge of bar 36 while the height of the arm pit would be determined from the upper edge of bar 36. The front face of the crosshead 21 is cut out, as shown in Figs. 2"and 4, to make the numbers on the standard visible and to permit the pawl to engage the ratchet teeth.

To take measurements, as for instance for a coat, the person stands on the base about midway between the front and rear standards, facing the front standard I 3. The crosshead I1 is raised to the height of the neck and the bar 22 pushed toward the person until the cross be: 25 engages the back of his neck, and the bar 22 is then secured by a set screw 4I. The crosshead I 9 and bar 24 are then raised until the bar 24 engages the crotch. The crosshead 21 is raised to the height of the chest and the bar 28 moved until the cross arm 29 engages against the chest. The bar 28 is then secured inposi tion by a set screw 42. The subject is thus held more or less in a fixed position so that relatively accurate measurements can be made. V The crosshead I8 is then raised and bar 23 moved inwardly until the lower edge of the cross bar 26 engages the point where the top of the coat collar is located, at the middle of the back of the neck. The height from the base and the distance from the crosshead is noted and the crosshead and bar are moved to the next position, which will be a few inches lower, the measurement again noted, and so on, to the bottom of the coat, In this manner, the contour of the neck is found and by then moving the slides 30 and 3! carrying the arms 32 and by moving the sleeves 35 on the arms 32,

the bars 36 may be brought into engagement with various points at the sides of the person to ascertain the side contours of the body.

To measure the front of the body, the set screw 42 is released and the crosshead 21 and bar 28 are moved in the same manner as crosshead I8 and bar 23. To take accurate measurements for the sleeves, an ordinary tailors square 13*. shown) may be used in conjunction with the bars 36 to measure the width of the arm at the top, elbow and wrist, at the same time ascertaining the natural hang of the arm, which, with present methods, is more or less guesswork. After the various measurements have been taken, it is a relatively simple matter for the tailor to lay out the coat; and in a similar manner, unnecessary to describe, the vest and the trousers may be measured.

When employing the device to take measurements for physical culture records, criminal records, etc., the operation would be substantially the same only more detailed and the measurements would probably begin with the height of the subject, the width and thickness of the head, etc.

The device, while relatively simple in its construction and operation, will take measurements of the human body as accurately as is necessary for a perfect fit. The standards II and I2, being relatively close together, permit the device to be used on extremely thin persons and small children. The slides 30 and 3|, working independently of each other, enable the measurements of the right and left side of the body to be taken separately, yet very accurately. This is highly desirable as these measurements generally difi'er from each other. Obviously, the present invention is not restricted to the particular embodiment thereof herein shown and described. Moreover, it is not indispensable that all the features of the invention be used conjointly, since they may be employed advantageously in various combinations and sub-combinations.

What I claim is:-

l. A measuring apparatus comprising, in come bination, a base; front and rear standards on the base; graduated bars slidable on the standards and adapted to be clamped thereto to measure the front and rear profiles of a subject standing on the base between the standards; and means independently adjustable on the rear standards and constructed and arranged to measure the two side profiles of the subject.

2. A measuring apparatus comprising, in combination, a base; a front standard; a pair of adjacent spaced rear standards; crossheads slidably mounted between the rear standards; a crosshead slidably mounted on the front standard; a graduated horizontal bar slidable in each crosshead, said bars being parallel to each other; means to clamp said bars in adjusted positions; slidable members on the rear standards; horizontal arms rigid on the slidable members and at right angles to the bars; sleeves slidable on the arms; and graduated horizontal bars secured to the sleeves and parallel to the other bars.

3. A measuring apparatus comprising, in combination, a base; a front standard; a pair of adjacent, spaced, rear standards; crossheads mounted between the rear standards; a crosshead slidably mounted on the front standard; a graduated horizontal bar slidable in each crosshead, said bars being parallel to each other; slidable members on the rear standards; horizontal arms rigid on the slidable members and at right angles to the bars; sleeves slidable on the arms; graduated horizontal bars secured to the sleeves and parallel to the other bars; and means to hold the crossheads and slidable members in vertical adjusted positions.

4. A measuring apparatus comprising, in combination, a base; a front standard; a pair of adjacent, spaced, rear standards; crossheads mounted between the rear standards; a crosshead slidably mounted on the front standard; means horizontally slidable in the crossheads and adapted to engage points on the front and rear portions of a subject standing between the front and rear standards; slidable members on the rear standards; lateral arms on the members; and means slidable on the arms to engage points on the sides of the subject.

5. A measuring apparatus comprising, in combination, a base; a front standard; a pair of adjacent, spaced, rear standards; crossheads mounted between the rear standards; a crosshead slidably mounted on the front standard; means horizontally slidable in the crossheads and adapted to engage points on the front and rear of the subject; slidable members on the rear standards; lateral arms on the members; means slidable on the arms to engage points on the sides of the subject; and calibrated means on the arms and said slidable means to determine the distance of said points from the standards.

6. A measuring device comprising, in combination, front and rear standards located so that a person may stand between them; means on said standards to engage a persons body and to hold it steady; other means movable vertically on the standards and adjustable horizontally to ascertain the front and rear profiles of the body; and additional means slidable vertically on the rear standard and movable horizontally towards and from said standard and adapted to engage the sides of the body to measure the side profiles thereof.

'7. A measuring apparatus comprising, in combination, a base; three graduated standards secured to the base, two of said standards being close together at one end of the base and the third being at the other end of the base and spaced from the other two sufliciently far to permit a person to stand between; the base being free of parts which would interfere with the movement of a person to a position between said spaced standards; vertically slidable members on the three standards; and graduated horizontal bars slidably carried by each of said members.

8. A measuring apparatus comprising, in combination, a base; a pair of vertical standards secured to the base and being spaced apart sufficiently far to permit a person to stand between them; the base being free of parts which would interfere with the movement of a. person to a position between said spaced standards; a slidable member adjustably held on each of the standards; horizontal bars slidable in the slidable members; a pair of lateral arms projecting horizontally on opposite sides of one of the standards; means slidably mounting the lateral arms on the standard from which they project; and a horizontal bar slidably mounted on each of the lateral arms.

9. A measuring apparatus comprising, in com bination, front and rear standards so mounted and free of interfering devices that a person may stand between them; means on each of said standards adjustably secured thereto to engage V a persons body and hold it steady, said means together engaging said body on opposite sides; and other means on one of said standards adjustable vertically and horizontally to permit the determination of the front and rear profiles of the body.

EDWIN J. BISEL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2533588 *Dec 17, 1945Dec 12, 1950Karel KondorThree-dimensional layout equipment
US2659158 *May 28, 1946Nov 17, 1953Fellows Gear Shaper CoMachine for testing characteristics of gear cutters, gears, and the like
US2810964 *Jul 12, 1955Oct 29, 1957Engelbert Richard MDevice for determining the positions of the ilii in relation to each other
US2915825 *Jun 24, 1958Dec 8, 1959Roland Robert AlcidTailor's marking and measuring guage
US3196551 *May 8, 1963Jul 27, 1965Joseph R ProvostIntegrated anthropometric device
US3753293 *Apr 15, 1971Aug 21, 1973Automeasure IncApparatus for use in the making or alteration of garments
US3955285 *Sep 9, 1974May 11, 1976Ernst MoecklDevice for measuring posture-determining parameters of a human body
US4279260 *Sep 28, 1979Jul 21, 1981Stump Lee KOcclusal instrument
US4342154 *Apr 29, 1980Aug 3, 1982Applied Power Inc.Measuring bridge
US5060393 *Mar 11, 1991Oct 29, 1991Pin Dot ProductsApparatus for taking body measurements
US5490517 *Apr 12, 1994Feb 13, 1996The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyOccupant reach and mobility apparatus
US6196981 *Jun 28, 1999Mar 6, 2001Norman P GustafsonForward head posture measuring device
US6226881 *Aug 12, 1999May 8, 2001Clover Global Group, Inc.Height-measuring device
US6931747 *Dec 2, 2003Aug 23, 2005Fernando RegoTailoring guide system
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/2.00R, 33/512
International ClassificationA41H1/00, A41H1/04
Cooperative ClassificationA41H1/04
European ClassificationA41H1/04