Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2053990 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1936
Filing dateSep 13, 1930
Priority dateSep 13, 1930
Publication numberUS 2053990 A, US 2053990A, US-A-2053990, US2053990 A, US2053990A
InventorsErnest G Goodwin
Original AssigneeStandard Coupler Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anti-oscillating device
US 2053990 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

p E. G. GOODWIN 2,053,990

' ANTIOSCILLATING DEVICE Filed Sept. 15, 1930 2 sheets-sheet 1 INVENTOR Sept. 8, 1936. E. G. GOODWIN I ANTIOSCILLATING DEVICE iled Sept. 15, 1930 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 III I nil #0 1} A i IN VENTOR f QDWl/V .4 TTORN Patented Sept. 8, 1936 ANTI-OSOIILATING DEVICE Ernest c. Goodwin, Pelham, N. Y., assignor to Standard Coupler Oompany,'New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey Application September 13, mo, sou-m no, 481,764

24 Claim.

This invention relates to anti-oscillating devices and has for its principal object the provision of a railway bolster damper which will allow the column pressures to be more nearly proportional to the vertical load than is possible in the type where the bolster has direct frictional contact with the shoes which slide verticallyibetween the columns of the side frame of the truck.

A further object of .the invention is the provision of a truck structure in which the shoes act as spring seats and have anti-friction contact with the bolster ends, using either rollers or balls. the latter providing lateral motion which motion is rather impractical when using rollers. I

In ordinary bolster construction there is always a tendency for the cars to rock excessively whether loaded or not, this tendency arising whenever the speed of the car is such that the side to side rock of the car is timed with respect to low places in the rails, in other words, whenever a wheel passes over a low place the springis expanded and there naturally follows a rocking of the car toward the expanded spring. At some definite speed of car travel the oscillation will be complete in time to meet the next low point and this will add to the amount of rocking until, in extreme cases, ,the springs are brought solid, damaging not only them, but other portions of the car. This matter is set forth rathcrfully in my pending application, Serial No. 358,253,

tion-in-part and in general, except for Figure 6,

is an improvement over the preferred form of the earlier application. I

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation partly in vertical section.

Figure 2 is a horizontal section taken in part just above the bolster and in part just below the top plate of the bolster.

Figure 3 is a vertical section substantially on the transverse center line of the bolster.

Figure 4 is a section taken on the sloping plane 4-4 of Figure 1.

Figure 5 is similar to Figure 4 but shows-balls instead of rollers.

Figure 6 is a modified form. I

Figure 7 is a vertical section thru a shoe.

Figure 8 is a modified form generally similar to Figure 1.

The side frame iii of the truck is of substantially standard type save for the fact'that it is ecessed at H to receivea liner l2 secured to the column l4 as by-the rivets". This slight modification from standard practice offers no obstacle whatsoever to interchangeability because the outside horizontal dimensions of the liner 4 agree perfectly with the approved dimensions of the standard column so that my modified side 5 frame canbe used with any approved bolster and it might also be mentioned at this point that the bolster itself while quite diii'erent fromordinary practice is thoroughly interchangeable as far as "size is concerned, that is, it can be used in any 19 standard truck side frame when accompanied by its shoes, provided that the car is not loaded to a greater extent than the side frame columns can stand, remembering that with the anti-oscillating device of the present invention'there is an 1 ster' and the springs a shoe 2| having a vertical channel-shaped face slidingly engaging the liner l2 and having ball or roller contact with the bolster end. The bosses I! are shaped with clearance toward the columns so that the shoes may move outwardly as wear. takes place with- 25 out causing the'springs to tilt away from each other at 'their tops. The clearance may be pro-: vided'by givingthe bosses I! an elliptical shape with the major axis parallel to the liner face as shown in the plan view Figure 2. See also Fig- 80 ure 1 which shows the boss I! to the left of the axis of the springs is. As the shoe and liner surfaces wear away the center of the boss II will approach the axis of the springs. In the form shown in Figures 1-4 the non-friction member is a roller 22, the drawings illustrating only one roller on each sloping face of the bolster end altho obviously four or even more of the rollers couldbe used at each bolster end, the principal objection to the greater number being that by the use of only two of the rollers as illustrated a better-provision is made for warping of the truck, and positioning horizontal thrust on the side' frame columns and shoe faces, and these advantages appearto be mor important than the advantages which would accrue if four or more rollers were used per nd.' The rollers 22 are confined in alined recesses 23- in theboister slop-- ing face 24 and'recess 2B in the corresponding .sloping face 26 of the shoes. To allow for the 50 natural wear at the side of each of the two shoes recesses 23 and 25 are formed slightly wider from side to side than momentarily required and not precisely opposite each other.

It will be seen from Figure 1 that the column 1 pressures will be closely proportional to the vertical load, the friction between the bolster and the shoe being substantially negligible, so that an increase in downward pressure on the top of the bolster would cause the axes of the two rollers 22 and shoes 2| to move outward from the transverse center of the bolster and this will cause an increased pressure between the shoe 2i and the liner l2.

In the modified form in Figure 5 a number of balls 3| are substituted for each of the rollers 22, the action being generally the same save that since the balls also provide for lateral motion of the bolster relative to the truck frame which motion however is impractical when rollers are used. The clearance at each lateral side of the shoe, i. e., at II, and the clearance between the bolster and the angular ends a and 34 of the shoe can be made any preferred amount, whereas these clearances, particularly those between thefianges of the shoe and bolster, should be held at a minimum whenever the rollers are used in order that the longitudinal slip on the roller shall be kept down to as small an amount as manufacturing practice will permit, and this in turn is taken care of by governing the distance between the outside vertical flanges 35 and 36 of the bolster, between which flanges the channelshaped section of the shoes 2| are received.

In Figure '1 the load P is the spring load which is naturally centered at the axis of the spring. On account of friction against the column this spring will support a load greater than P or P-l on a stationary or downward stroke due to the friction between the shoe and the column. P--! is the horizontal component of PI and the resultant of these two loads is 1 -3, P-3 being the load on the roller and which, of course, is more than the load to be supported. P2' with the indicated position of the roller is slightly below midway of the friction face, and unless combined with some other force it would cause uneven wear of the shoe and liner. By arranging the load P slightly to the left of roller contact with the shoe a clockwise motion of the shoe is set up which is counteracted by load P. The

result of load P and P-Z' is equivalent to P-l, both in amount and location, at Z distance from the top of the shoe and Z+ distance from the bottom of theshoe. This will mean a slight tendency for the shoe to wear faster at the top than at the bottom, but on the other hand the shoe engages the column lower down when the pressures are greatest and therefore would tend to wear the liner more at the bottom. If this proportion is just right the face against which the spring reacts will remain horizontal, and since both the shoe and liner are readily renewable the proper alignment can be maintained. The load P-l on the downward stroke is substantially equal to the spring value P, plus -of load P-J depending on the co-efllcient of on the column can be increased or decreased by changing the distance X and also by changing the slope of the roller seats.

While in practice it has been found that the rivets which hold the liner to the column are suflicient to hold the liner in place I rather prefer to cup the column as at 38 and to provide the liner with bosses 39 which snugly fit into the recess 38 which are preferably slightly conical. The rivets then pass thru the boss and the wall of the recess but in this case the fit between the boss and the recess prevents any possible relative movement between the liner and the column as the shoe slides against the column and obviously there is no possible shearing action on the rivets. This construction is actually used in all the modiflcations but for convenience of illustration the liners in the other forms are shown in their simplest type.

In Figure 8 pads 31 composed of a resilient material such as relatively hard rubber are used between the bolster ends and the shoes instead of rollers or balls. Such construction not only permits the shoes to readily adjust themselves to proper engagement with the side frame columns but also provides additional cushioningof both vertical and longitudinal loads. The rubber will readily allow or provide the necessary slight movements for the two shoes to snugly engage the columns and without actual movement between the rubber face and the shoe or bolster.

What I claim is:

1. In a truck, a side frame, a spring supported bolster having oppositely sloping walls near the ends, means for frictionally engaging the frame upon application of vertical pressure to the bolster, and means having rolling engagement with the last mentioned means and with the sloping bolster walls.

2. A bolster having at its bottom at each end a pair of walls sloping upwardly and outwardly from the central plane of the bolster and having roller receiving recesses in said bottom walls.

3. In a truck, a side frame, a bolster, springs for supporting the bolster on the truck, a spring seat having a side face frictionally engaging the side frame, and balls mounted between the spring seat and the bolster.

4. In an anti-oscillating support, a friction surface, a member spring pressed to move in a direction parallel to said surface, a load carrier, a rolling element between the load carrier and the member engaging walls of each, which walls slope with respect to the friction surface so as to cause the friction surface to be engaged by the member to absorb a portion of the load, the distance from the point of contact between the rolling element and the spring pressed member to the friction surface being other than the distance from the friction surface to the center of reaction between the spring and the member.

5. In an anti-oscillating support, a friction surface, a member spring pressed to move in a direction parallel to said surface, a load carrier, a rolling element between the load carrier and the member engaging walls of each, which walls slope with respect to the friction surface so as to cause the friction surface to be engaged by the member to absorb a portion of the load, the distance from the point of contact between the rolling element and the spring pressed member to the friction surface being less than the distance from the friction surface to the center of reaction between the spring and the member.

6. In an anti-oscillating support, a friction Q um'ns and also providing additional cushioning aosaooo surface, a member spring pressed to move in a direction parallel to said surface, a load carrier, a rolling element between the load carrier and the member engaging walls of each, which walls slope with respect to the friction surface so as to cause ,the friction surface to be eng ed by the memberto absorb a" portion of the load, said surface being vertical, and the point of contact between the rolling element and the vertically moving member being offset with respect to the center of the spring so that the, pressure on the friction surface is equalized.

7. In a truck, a side frame column having .a

bolster, the point of contact between the ele'- ment and shoe being nearer the bottom than the topof the vertical face of the shoe so as to throw the load toward the bottom of the shoe and being nearer the vertical face of the shoe than is the center of pressure of the spring so as to throw the load toward the top of the shoe, whereby the pressure between the shoe and column is equalised.

8. 'In an anti-oscillating .device, a side frame column, a bolster, a shoe between the bolster and the column and adapted to frictionally engage the column to dampen rocking, means between the bolster and the shoe to permit relative posed parallel walls on the bolster and shoes sloping upwardly and outwardly from the centerline of the bolster, a plurality of rolling elements engaging said sloping walls, the points of rolling contact between the elements and the sloping walls of the shoes being such that the upper portions of the shoes tend to tilt away from each other to counteract the tendency of the bottoms of the shoes to tilt away from each other under heavy load. v v v 10. The device of claim 9 in which the rolling elements are cylinders, the lines of contact of thecylinders withthe bolster being nearer tosether than the lines of contact between the cylinders and the shoes.

11. A friction shoe having an elliptical boss to project into the supporting spring to allow the shoe to move outwardly as wear takes place without tipping the spring.

12. In a truck, a side frame having two parallel columns, a pair of spring supported shoes each engaging one of the columns and each having a sloping face directed downwardly toward the center of the truck, a bolster having two sloping faces each sloping downwardly from the column toward the center line of the bolster, and a'yielding pad between the bolster and each shoe, said pad permitting the shoes to adjust themselves to proper engagement with the colof both vertical and longitudinal loads.

and rollers between said means and the seat and also between said means and the bolster.

14. A device for preventing sticking of a snubbing member due for example to irregularities in parallelism of the faces of the opening of a side frame, comprising the combination with 'a side frame having a bolster receiving opening with opposite, substantially vertical walls, a bolster end extending within said opening and resiliently supported upon said side frame, and a snubbing member with a vertical friction face and a second face sloping with respect to the walls of the opening for changing vertical forces into horizontal pressure on the friction face, of yielding means engaging saidsecond face of the snubbing member to prevent locking of the friction face of the snubbing' member.

15. In a car truck, side frames having bolster columns,.a bolster, bolster springs supported by said side frames and indirectly supporting the ends of said bolster and means interposed between said springs and said bolster permitting lateral motion of said bolster relative to said side frames and at the same time acting against columns, bolster springs supported on said side' frames, wedge members resting on said springs and bearing against said columns, said wedge members having inclined surfaces, balls resting on said inclined surfaces, a truck bolster having surfaces at its ends facing said inclined surfaces, the said facing surfaces of said bolster resting on said balls, said balls cooperating with said inclined surfaces to tend to move said wedge members closer towards said columns as said springs are increasingly compressed while permitting lateral motion of said bolster relative to said side frames. I

17. In a car truck, side frames having bolster columns, bolster springs supported by said side frames, wedge members resting on said springs and bearing against said columns, said wedge -members having inclined surfaces extending diagonally upwardly and toward the respective ends of said side frames .from adjacent the central vertical transverse plane of the truck, balls supported on said inclined surfaces, a truck bolster ing surfaces of said truck bolster and supporting the ends of said bolster to permit of lateral motion of the bolster relative to the side frames and at the same time to force said wedge members into tighter frictional engagement with said columns as said springs are increasingly compressed.

18. In acar truck, side frames having bolster columns, bolster springs supported by said side frames,'wedge members resting on said springs and bearing against said columns, said wedge members having inclined surfaces extending. diagonally upwardly and toward the respective ends of said side frames from adjacent the central vertical transverse plane of the truck, said inclined surfaces having ball recesses formed therein, balls disposed within said recesses, a truck bolster, the ends of which have surfaces opposing said inclined surfaces of said wedge members, said opposing surfaces of said bolster resting on said balls whereby lateral motion of the bolster relative to the side frames is permitted and at the same time said balls will force said wedge members into tighter frictional engagement with said columns as forces are applied to said spring to increasingly compress the same. 19. In a car truck, side frames having bolster columns, bolster springs supported by said side frames, wedge members resting on said springs and bearing against said columns, said wedge members having inclined surfaces extending diagonally upwardly and toward the respective ends of said side frames from adjacent the central springs are increasingly compressed.

20. In a car truck, side frames having bolster columns, wear plates lining said columns bolster springs supported by said side frames, wedge members resting on said spring and abutting saidwear plates, s'aid wedge members having inclined surfaces extending diagonally'upwardly andoutwardly toward the respective ends of said side frames from adjacent the inner edges of said wedge members, balls supported on said inclined surfaces and a truck bolster having surfaces at its ends facing the inclined surfaces of said wedge members, said facing surfaces of said bolster resting on said balls.

21. A bolster having at its bottom at each end a pair of walls sloping upwardly and outwardly 'from the central plane of the bolster and having a recess in one of said bottom walls to receive a rolling element.

22. In a car truck, side frames having bolster columns, a bolster, b'olster springs supported by said side frames and indirectly supporting the ends of said bolster, and means interposed between said springs and said bolster permitting lateral motion of said bolster relative to said side frames and said springs and at the same time acting against said columnsto damp the action of said springs as they are compressed.

23. In a device of the character described, a car supporting member, a pair of shoes for dampening vertical movement of said member, and rolling means for permitting lateral movement of the member with respect to the shoes.

24. In a device of the character described, a bolster end, a side frame having a central opening within which the bolster end is positioned, a

ster end, said means also providing lateral movement of the bolster upon the shoes.

ERNEST G. GOODWIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2435385 *Oct 9, 1944Feb 3, 1948Symington Gould CorpFriction damped railway truck
US2460211 *Sep 20, 1944Jan 25, 1949Symington Gould CorpRailway truck journal box mounting
US2888300 *Sep 29, 1953May 26, 1959Towmotor CorpWear plates for mast assembly
US3356331 *Oct 28, 1965Dec 5, 1967Springuel Francois MShock absorber
US3358614 *Nov 16, 1964Dec 19, 1967Standard Car Truck CoSnubbed railroad car truck
US3575117 *Jun 12, 1968Apr 13, 1971Amsted Ind IncRailway truck bolster snubber
US3654870 *Apr 29, 1970Apr 11, 1972Diversified Ind IncDampened railway truck
US4003318 *Jun 25, 1975Jan 18, 1977Standard Car Truck CompanyReinforced bolster pocket wall
US4103623 *Dec 23, 1976Aug 1, 1978Amsted Industries IncorporatedSquaring frictionally snubbed railway car truck
US4109585 *Dec 23, 1976Aug 29, 1978Amsted Industries IncorporatedFrictionally snubbed railway car truck
US4282979 *Jun 1, 1979Aug 11, 1981Ringfeder G.M.B.H.Force absorbing arrangement
US4915031 *Dec 23, 1988Apr 10, 1990Hansen, Inc.Railway truck damping assembly
US5555817 *Jul 1, 1994Sep 17, 1996Standard Car Truck CompanyPad of substantially rigid synthetic resin for a friction wedge in a bolster pocket
US6659016Aug 1, 2001Dec 9, 2003National Steel Car LimitedRail road freight car with resilient suspension
US6874426Feb 3, 2003Apr 5, 2005National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck with bearing adapter and method
US6895866Aug 1, 2002May 24, 2005National Steel Car LimitedRail road freight car with damped suspension
US6920828Nov 6, 2003Jul 26, 2005National Steel Car LimitedRail road freight car with resilient suspension
US7004079Jan 31, 2003Feb 28, 2006National Steel Car LimitedRail road car and truck therefor
US7143700Jul 8, 2004Dec 5, 2006National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck and fittings therefor
US7255048Aug 1, 2002Aug 14, 2007Forbes James WRail road car truck with rocking sideframe
US7328659Jul 25, 2005Feb 12, 2008National Steel Car LimitedRail road freight car with resilient suspension
US7497169Dec 4, 2006Mar 3, 2009National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck and fittings therefor
US7571684Sep 11, 2007Aug 11, 2009National Steel Car LimitedRail road freight car with damped suspension
US7603954May 14, 2007Oct 20, 2009National Steel Car LimitedRail road car and truck therefor
US7610862Aug 14, 2007Nov 3, 2009National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck with rocking sideframe
US7631603Dec 3, 2004Dec 15, 2009National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck and bolster therefor
US7654204Dec 29, 2008Feb 2, 2010National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck with bearing adapter and method
US7699008Sep 11, 2007Apr 20, 2010National Steel Car LimitedRail road freight car with damped suspension
US7775163Sep 24, 2007Aug 17, 2010National Steel Car LimitedRail road car and bearing adapter fittings therefor
US7823513Dec 24, 2003Nov 2, 2010National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck
US7845288Jul 8, 2004Dec 7, 2010National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck and members thereof
US7946229May 16, 2008May 24, 2011National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck
US8011306Oct 20, 2009Sep 6, 2011National Steel Car LimitedRail road car and truck therefor
US8113126Dec 15, 2009Feb 14, 2012National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck and bolster therefor
US8272333Dec 7, 2010Sep 25, 2012National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck and members thereof
US8413592Nov 2, 2010Apr 9, 2013National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck
US8720347Sep 15, 2012May 13, 2014National Steel Car LimitedRelieved bearing adapter for railroad freight car truck
US8726812Sep 15, 2012May 20, 2014National Steel Car LimitedRail road freight car truck with self-steering rocker
US8746151Mar 3, 2009Jun 10, 2014National Steel Car LimitedRail road car truck and fitting therefor
US8770113Aug 10, 2009Jul 8, 2014National Steel Car LimitedRail road freight car with damped suspension
Classifications
U.S. Classification105/198.2, 105/186, 267/212, 267/211
International ClassificationB61F5/12
Cooperative ClassificationB61F5/12
European ClassificationB61F5/12