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Publication numberUS2054527 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1936
Filing dateJun 1, 1931
Priority dateJun 1, 1931
Publication numberUS 2054527 A, US 2054527A, US-A-2054527, US2054527 A, US2054527A
InventorsTeague Merwyn C
Original AssigneeUs Rubber Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Playing surface
US 2054527 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PLAYING SURFACE Filed June 1, 1931 INVENTOR Mffild m 6. 75/4655 AT im Patented Sept. 15, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PLAYING SURFACE tion of New Jersey Application June 1, 1931, Serial No. 541,160

6 Claims.

This invention relates to playing surfaces for golf and similar games, and is particularly concerned with an artificial playing surface capable of outdoor as well as indoor use.

A surface characterizing the invention is illustrated in the drawing. I represents a piece of suitable felt of fibrous material, preferably a coarse open curled hair felt made from curled hair of animal tails and manes. The material may be impregnated with a suitable waterproof binding medium such for instance as an aqueous rubber dispersion which is to be preferred. This dispersion may contain vulcanizing and. compounding ingredients and when the felt is thoroughly impregnated therewith the rubber binder locks the fibres together and at the same time makes them stiffer and more bristly. Most of the fibres are thus themselves coated with waterproof binding material thereby protecting them from wear and deterioration caused by the action of the elements. The fibres may be colored by an independent dyeing operation or by treatment with an aqueous dispersion of rubber in which coloring ingredients have been incorporated, or in both ways.

After the binding medium has dried and set, the

impregnated felt may be laid upon a suitable base, for instance a tamped cinder base, and bound thereto with an adhesive such as Portland cement. After this is' done a limited amount of sand, sawdust, crushed slate or other granular material 3 may be spread upon the surface of the impregnated felt in a manner-such as to allow the same to partially fill-the open spaces between the fibres. eare should be taken, however, that the quantity of granular material applied be not sufficient to completely fill the spaces or to cover the numerous bristly fibre ends 2 which extend upwardly from the interfelted mass. It should'be understood that the fibres 2 are stifiened by the coating of binding material, and in the case of rubber deposited from an impregnating bath they are substantially encased with a protecting and supporting film. If desired, binder may be sprayed upon the surface of the felt instead of being impregnated into the same from a bath.

The surface constructed as above set out, when rubber is used as a binding medium, is damped or deadened by the incorporated granular material so that it does not possess an unrestrained resilient or rubbery effect'which otherwise might cause a ball falling on the surface to rebound too vigorously. Moreover the impregnating treatment protects the surface as well as the internal structure against wear and damage by players, particularly that caused by the high heels of womens' shoes. This preserves the original quality and texture of the surface and insures uniformity in playing thereon. 5 The granular material used in the construction 'of the novel playing surface is preferably round grain sea sand instead of slate or ground rock as the latter have sharp edges and may cut the fibres to an undesirable extent. It is of course 10 possible to use light weight material such as sawdust, providing the same is of sufficient fineness so that it filters down into the spaces between the interlocked fibres to form a firm foundation. The granular material is preferably 15 sifted into place by a gentle tapping or tamping on the surface to form a relatively firm body which does not pack down too tightly and render the-surface too fast as a putting green. The granular material performs the function of hold- 20 ing the interlocked fibres in place and of affording a soft tread which might otherwise be too springy and precipitate wear on the inner structure of the material by constant flexing. By the combined use of granular material and upstanding bristly 25 fibres produced in the manner described, it is possible to obtain a true, slow putting playing surface which is not too fast because of closely packed down granular material nor too slow on account of the drag exerted upon a ball by the 30 numerous upstanding bristles.

As the upper surface of the novel artificial playing surface is worn off and the tops of the fibres are broken or worn down, the playing surface may be revivified by merely sweeping 5 oh. the broken ends and some of the loose granular material so as to uncover'further, lengths of upstanding fibres. In this manner a semipermanent playing surface of low maintenance is obtained and one which simulates grass or turf 40 and which enables a ball to be rolled thereover on a true line.

The sand or granular material used may be colored a green color to accentuate the grass-like appearance of the surface. medium in which a suitable organic or inorganic coloring material has been incorporated may be used.

The novel surface described is one which can be easily drained and thus utilized not only for in- 50 door but for outdoor use.

Having thus describedmy invention, what I claim and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

l. A playing surface comprising a coarse open curled hair felt with the hairs locked by a rubber Likewise a binding 45 k composition which does not fill up the spaces between said hairs, said spaces being partially filled with loose granular material.

2. A playing surface comprising a coarse open fibrous felt with the fibres locked by the direct deposit of solids from an aqueous dispersion of rubber which does not fill up the spaces between said fibres, said spaces being partially filled with a loose granular filler.

p 3. A playing surfacecomprising a coarse open curled hair felt with the hairs locked by -a rubber composition which does not fill up the spaces between said hairs, said spaces being partially filled with loose sand. v

4. A playing surface comprising a coarse open curled hair felt with the hairs locked by the direct deposit of solids from an aqueous-dispersion of rubber which does not fill up the spaces between said hair's, said spaces being partially filled with loose sand. 4

5. An artificial playing bed comprising a relatively hard base and a. surface adhered thereto comprising a coarse open curled hair felt with the 5 hair locked by a rubber material which does not fill up the spaces between said hairs.

hairs locked by the direct deposit of solids from an aqueous dispersion of rubber which does not fill up the spaces between said hairs, said spaces be- ,ing filled with loose granular material to a depth below the top of theplaying surface to protect the 15 surface from damage and to dampen the resilient effect of the same. MERWYN C. TEAGUE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4337283 *Sep 11, 1980Jun 29, 1982Haas Jr Frederick TSynthetic turf playing surface with resilient top-dressing
DE3129837A1 *Jul 29, 1981Feb 3, 1983Bager SenSports floor covering
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/27
International ClassificationE01C13/08
Cooperative ClassificationE01C13/08
European ClassificationE01C13/08