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Publication numberUS2055291 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 22, 1936
Filing dateAug 12, 1935
Priority dateAug 12, 1935
Publication numberUS 2055291 A, US 2055291A, US-A-2055291, US2055291 A, US2055291A
InventorsHenry Carle D
Original AssigneeMaine Steel Products Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Material moving apparatus
US 2055291 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Se t. 22, 1936. c. D."HENRY 2,055,291

MATERIAL MOVING APPARATUS Filedv Aug. 12, 1935 3 Sheets-Sheet l Sept 22,1936.

C.D.HENRY MATERIAL MOVING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 12, 1955 Sept 1936- c. D. HENRY MATERIAL MOVING APPARATUS 7 Filed Aug. 12, 1935 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 M w 1 a .3 I W z \j \n A \s\\\ H I 1 H14!!! 4 I1 1 Z 1 1 1 H 1n 1; en tor tarleEHenzy Patented Sept. 22, 1936 UNITED STATES MATERIAL MOVING APPARATUS Carlo D. Henry,.South Portland, Maine, assignor to Maine Steel Products Company. South Portland, Maine, a corporation of Maine Application August 12, 1935, Serial No. 35,690

16 Claims.

This invention relates to material moving apparatus, and is applicable to both snow plows and earth moving machines, such as bulldozers, trail builders, graders, scrapers and the like.

For the purposes of this application I shall discuss my invention in its adaptation to snow plows in which use it finds a field of immediate demand. It will be understood however that this treatment is purely illustrative and in no way limiting, and that the principles apply to the moving or handling of materials other than snow, as for example, earth, garbage, etc.

Considering the snow plow as typical of the problems presented, I would note at the outset that my invention is equally adaptable to snow plows of both the V. and the one way or reversible blade type and in wings for same.

The urgent need for which improvement arises from the increasing consciousness of the public that a road is not really cleared until it is safe for traflic, which means substantially free from ice as well as cleared from deep snow.

The only way to keep a road free from ice is to remove all the snow as it falls by plowing clean to the surface of the road. When plowing of this type is adopted and particularly with a modcm high speed truck, the plow has been commonly constructed with a tripping device so that contact with a slightly raised manhole plate or other obstruction will not wreck the plow and truck and endanger the life of the driver.

The types of trip cutting edge snow plows heretofore on the market have been satisfactory in so far as the ability to trip over obstacles is concerned, but as the public requirement for plowing closer and closer is developed they have become less and less satisfactory, because they had a tendency to trip too easily over hubbly ice or ice ruts in the road which should be plowed oil. This tendency to trip too easily has caused a chattering of the blade or cutting edge which has tended to make the plow jump and to leave enough snow and ice to make the road slippery and dangerous to drive over, and the only remedy for the chattering has been to provide the plow with runners which would raise its cutting edge slightly off the road surface. This stops the chattering but the cure is as bad as the disease because a cutting edge raised off the pavement has no chance of plowing clean and ice formation again results.

I have therefore reached the conclusion that as long as raising the blade with runners does not get clean plowing, and as longas conventional tripping mechanisms chatter without runners,

the solution to the problem is a tripping mechanism that can be left down without chattering.

This requires a drastic multiplication of the spring tension behind the trip and the provision of adequate strength in the construction of the 5 same to stand the impact of a collision against this increased spring tension without wrecking the outfit.

In the conventional tripping edge the springs act directly against the removable cutting edge of the plow. The strength of this cutting edge is definitely limited by the dimensional limits of State specifications and by the fact that it is the wearing edge of the plow and must therefore be replaceable and of moderate cost. An edge frequently wears out in a single storm and its strength and power to resist deformation under impact, which reduces as it wears approximately in proportion to the square of its reduction in width, cannot be alone depended on.

Hence the necessity for the tripping sub-frame constituting the invention herein. Its advantages will be appreciated when it is borne in mind that every snow plow has to have a sub-frame behind the lower part of the mold board to increase the strength of the mold board plate.

In accordance with my invention, I provide my snow plow with two sub-frames. The upper one conventionally reenforces the mold board. The lower one is designed to take away from the cutting edge the strains of impact built up by the increased spring tension. The two subframes are hinged together with the removable cutting edge bolted rigidly to the lower subframe and these parts, together with the spring mechanism, permit the creationof a tripping device with sufilcient spring tension to plow clean without chattering and with sufficient strength to trip against this spring tension without deformation.

The changeable strength of the cutting edge due to wear no longer exists as..a necessary element to the strength of the trip. Instead the lower subframe furnishes the strength and is notsubject to wear and the cutting edge takes the wear but is no longer a necessary element to the strength of the mechanism. Moreover the runners are no longer necessary and clean plowing and ice prevention become practical under any and all road conditions.

Another advantage of my tripping subframe is the great saving of time and trouble when changing cutting edges. Where as in the conventional trip the springs act directly and independently against the cutting edge, each spring must be disconnected when the edge is removed. As the edse is the only connection between the free ends of the springs, the removal permits the springs to act independently and get out of line, necessitating a fighting of the spring tension when putting on the new edge.

With my trip subframe the springs are always attached to and kept in alignment by the lower subframe and the cutting edge can be changed as easily as though there were no springs.

In addition to its contribution of safety to the public my invention produces a very considerable economy to highway departments in the reduction of sanding bills.

If ice is permitted to form it must be sanded to prevent-accidents. In many States the cost of sanding is-more than the cost of snow removal. ..Only by the complete removal of the snow as it falls can this ice formation be prevented and the excessive cost of sanding be kept under control.

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary view as seen from the rear of a one way plow blade equipped with a trip subframe in accordance with my invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged detail section thereof showing in full and dotted lines respectively the untripped and tripped positions of the cutting edge.

Fig. 3 is a plan view showing the application of my tripping mechanism to a V plow, and

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary view showing the application of such tripping mechanism to the side wing of a wing piowl' Referring to Fig. 1 I have indicated at iii the moldboard of a one way plow, at ii the upper or fixed subframe, at i2 the lower or tripping subframe, and at l3 the cutting edge of the mold board. The mold board may be reversible, one way or V-type.

The upper or fixed subframe ii consists of a reinforcing member rigid with the mold board l0. It affords a support for one or more housings i4 containing trip springs i5.

The lower or tripping sub-frame l2 consists of a reinforcing member to which the cutting edge I3 is attached. If desired or necessary a spacing member l6 may be fastened to the sub-frame I2. The purpose of this member is to space the cutter bar downward with relation to the subframe ll so that more inches of wear can be obtained from the cutting edge before it wears up into the subframe II.

The upper and lower subframes ii and I! may be hinged together in any suitable manner so as to permit the lower subframe I! to trip rearwardly against the action of the trip springs l5 upon encountering any obstacle in the road and thereafter to be returned to original position by said trip springs One convenient manner of accomplishing this is to provide a hinge adjacent each trip spring housing I4. I have indicated at 11 hingecastings fast to the upper sub-frame ii. These may be formed each with a rearwardly projecting generally horizontal shelf area which is centrally apertured as at l8 to permit the connecting rod IQ of each spring housing to extend downwardly therethrough. Each casting i1 may be provided with a pair of spaced depending ears 20 which are apertured to receive a pivot pin 2i about which the lower sub-frame i2 trips as an axis. The pin 2i passes through the registering openings 22 in a plurality of spaced pairs of hinge flats .23, which straddle the connecting rods it. Each fiat pair' 23 is provided with registering holes adapted to receive a connecting pin 25 which passes through the eye of the connecting rod l9 disposed between such fiat pair.

Thus when the sub-frame i2 is tripped rearwardly by contact of an obstruction in the road with the cutting edge IS, the sub-frame l2 and the hinge flats 23 pivot around the pin 2| as an axis (see dotted lines Fig. 2). Such motion is reslsted by the trip spring l5 which is compressed as the connecting rod is moved upwardly by the v hinge flats 23 and returns the trip sub-frame II to normal position when .the cutting edge it passes over the obstruction.

This may conveniently be accomplished by threading the upper end of each connecting rod it into the bottom follower plate 21 of the housing ll against which plate the lower end of the trip spring it reacts. The upper end of said spring reacts against the top follower plate 28 of the housing.

Means are preferably provided to vary the tension of the spring 15. This may be accomplished in various ways. One extremely simple method is to thread a plug or its equivalent 30 into the upper end of the spring housing. Such plug is provided with an adiustment screw or its equivalent SI to which the top follower plate 28 is made fast, the adjustment of the screw 3i being held by any suitable lock nut 32;

Additionally, the upper ,and lower subframes may be hingedly connected together intermediate of the spring housings by still other hinge connections. This is desirable where the mold board is of any considerable length. As shown, I fasten to the lower or tripping subframe I! at suitably spaced intervals intermediate of the spring housings a plurality of pairs of spaced hinge flats 33. These extend upwardly and are apertured at their upper ends to receive hinge pins 34 which pass through the aligning apertures of a plurality of hinge flats 35 rigid with the upper or fixed subframe I I.

In Fig. 3 I have illustrated my tripping mechanism applied to a V plow. The removable cutting edges of the plow mold boards are indicated at i3. These are bolted or otherwise fastened in any desired manner to the lower or tripping subframes i2 which in turn are hinged to the upper or fixed sub-frames ii' by means of the hinges and spring assembly indicated generally at It.

Thus the two cutting edges are hinged parallel to the respective sides of the V. They are permitted to trip at their juncture point by reason of -a tapered nose riding bar 31 which is inserted between them at the apex of the V with its rear sides at right angles to the hinge line and its front side sharply tapered so that if an obstacle is struck in the exact center or apex of the V the tapering nose riding bar 31. will turn the plow sideways the few inches necessary to reach the tripping edge. This bar 31 is so narrow in practice and so tapered that substantially no shock results from a centered obstacle and from this point to the extreme rear ends of the V the plow is fully protected by the two cutting edges.

In Fig. 4 I have illustrated the application of my tripping mechanism to the side wing of a wing plow. In this figure the numeral 38 designates the wing. The cutting edge of the wing is indicated at l3a, the lower or tripping sub-frame at Ma, the upper or fixed sub-frame at Ila and the hinge and spring assemblies at Ma.

The application of a trip edge to a V plow is novel in the art and is made possible by this invention by reason of the greater spring tension permitted thereby. The problem is complicated by the fact that v plows run much heavier than plows of the single moldboard type. The added weight increases the normal friction by the cutting edge and the road surface and types of trip heretofore on the market have not had sufficient spring tension to hold thetrip edges in position against this increased frictional resistance. With the tripping sub-frame, V plows can be and have been built and are practical. 1

Similarly as to the application of the trip edge to the side wings of a snow plow where the problem is made even more complex by the very considerable length of the wings themselves and the angle at which the wing is disposed, particularly the high-lifted wing, when the wing contacts an obstruction.

Thus the tripping sub-frame is equally practical and advantageous on plows of the double moldboard or V type and also on side wings which are even more liable to collision than the main plow because they work so much off of the shoulder of the road where obstacles occur more frequently than in the centre of the road.

Various other modifications in uses and struc- What I therefore claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

'1. In material moving apparatus, the combination with a mold board and a cutting edge separate therefrom, of a sub-frame pivoted to the lower end of the mold board and approximately coextensive with the mold board and reinforcing the cutting edge, and a plurality of springs attached to the sub-frame and reactive between it and the mold board whereby the cutting edge may be replaced without interfering with the adjustment of the springs, said springs normally maintaining said cutting edge in cutting position but yieldable to permit said sub-frame to move in the direction of impact whenever the cutting edge encounters resistance sufiicient to overcome said springs and returning said sub-frame member to normal position after said cutting edge has passed the obstacle which caused it to trip said sub-frame.

2. In material moving apparatus, the combination with a mold board and a cutting edge separate therefrom, of a sub-frame pivoted to the lower end of the mold board and approximately co-extensive with the mold board and reenforcing the cutting edge, a plurality of compression springs acting between the mold board and subframe and exerting their power in a line substantially at right angles to said sub-frame, and a connecting rod between said sub-frame and each spring effective with said spring to normally maintain said cutting edge in cutting position but yieldable in an upward direction to permit said sub-frame to move rearwardly and upwardly whenever the cutting edge encounters resistance sumcient to overcome said springs and returning said sub-frame to normal position afterv said cutting edge has passed the obstacle which caused it to trip said sub-frame.

3. In a snow plow, the combination of a mold board and a cutting edge separate therefrom, of an upper fixed sub-frame approximately co-extensive with said mold board and to which the lower edge of the mold board is rigidly fastened, a lower tripping sub-frame pivoted to said fixed sub-frame and carrying and reenforcingsaid cutting edge, and a plurality of compression upper sub-frames and reactive against said lower I sub-frames for normally maintaining said cutting edges in cutting position, and a nose riding bar mounted between said cutting edges at the apex of the V nose.

5. The combination of claim 4, the nose riding bar being relatively narrow and tapered at its forward edge.

6. In material moving apparatus, the combination with a mold board and a cutting edge sep-, arate therefrom, of a fixed sub-frame rigidly attached to the lower edge of said mold board, a

, tripping sub-frame pivoted to said fixed subframe and carrying said cutting edge, and yieldable means mounted on said fixed sub-frame and reactive against said tripping sub-frame for normally maintaining said cutting edge in cutting position, but yieldable to permit s'aid tripping subframe to move in the direction of impact whenever the cutting edge e'ncounters resistance suflicient to overcome said yieldable means and returning said tripping sub-frame to normal posi-' tion after said cutting edge has passed the obstacle which caused it to trip-said tripping subframe.

7. In material moving apparatus, the combination with a mold board and a cutting edge separate therefrom, of an upper fixed sub-frame rigidly attached to the lower edge of said mold board, a lower tripping sub-frame pivoted to said fixed sub-frame and carrying said cutting edge, and a compression spring mounted on said fixed substacle which caused it to trip said tripping subframe.

8. In material moving apparatus, the com.- bination with a mold board and a cutting edge separate therefrom,-of an upper fixed sub-frame rigidly attached to the lower edge of said mold board, a lower tripping sub-frame pivoted to said fixed sub-frame and carrying said cutting edge,

both of said sub-frames being mounted, respectively, at the inner or rear faces of the parts to which they are attached, a compression spring mounted on said fixed sub-frame, and a connecting rod between said spring and said tripping subframe and effective with said spring to normally maintain said cutting edge in cutting position, but yieldable to permit said tripping sub-frame to move in the direction of impact whenever the cutting edge encounters resistance sufiicient to overcome said spring and returning said tripping sub-frame to normal position after said cutting edge has passed the obstacle which caused it to trip said tripping sub-frame.

9. In material moving apparatus. in combination, a mold board and a cutting edge separate therefrom, a fixed sub-frame rigid with said mold board, a spring housing mounted on said fixed sub-frame and containing a coiled spring, a hinge member carried by said fixed sub-frame and carrying a pivot-pin, a tripping sub-frame carrying said cutting edge, a pair of hinged members carried by said tripping sub-frame and pivoting around said pivot pin as an axis, and a connecting rod pinned to said hinge pair at one end and reactive against said spring at its opposite end.

10. The combination of claim 9 wherein the first named hinge member is apertured to permit the connecting rod to operate therethrough.

11. The'comblnation of claim 9 wherein the tripping sub-frame is additionally hinged to the fixed sub-frame by hinge means independent of said first-named hinge connections.

12. In material moving apparatus, the combination with a mold board and a cutting edge separate therefrom, of a fixed sub-frame rigid with said mold board, a tripping sub-frame pivotally connected to said mold board and carrying said cutting edge, a hinge member carried by said fixed sub-frame and carrying a pivot pin, a pair of hinge members carried by said tripping sub-frame and pivoting around said pivot pin as an axis, a connecting rod pinned at one end between said pair of hinged members, a follower fast to the opposite end of said connecting rod, a spring housing mounted on said fixed sub-frame and containing said follower, and a coil spring within said housing and reactive between said follower and the opposite end of the housing for normally maintaining said cutting edge in cutting position.

13. In material moving apparatus, the combination with a mold board and a cutting edge separate therefrom, of a fixed sub-frame rigid with said mold board, a tripping sub-frame pivotally connected to said mold board and carrying said cutting edge, a pivot pin about which said tripping sub-frame pivots as an axis, a hinge member carried by said fixed sub-frame and carrying said pivot pin, a pair of hinge members carried by said tripping frame and pivoting upon said pivot pin, a connecting pin disposed through 'said pair of hinge members, a connecting rod pinned at one end between said pair of hinged members by said connecting pin, a follower fast to the opposite end, of said connecting rod, a spring housing mounted on said fixed sub-frame and containing said follower, a coil spring within said housing and reactive between said follower and the opposite end of the casing for normally maintaining said cutting edge in cutting position, and an additional hinge connection between said fixed sub-frame and said tripping sub-frame and independent'of said first-named hinge connections.

14. Material moving apparatus, comprising a mold board and a renewable and replaceable cutting edge separate therefrom, a tripping mechanism coacting with said cutting edge to normally maintain it in normal operating position and comprising an upper sub-frame and a'lower subframe, the cutting edge being rigidly but demountably attached to said lower sub-frame and being reinforced thereby throughout its entire length, the upper sub-frame being rigidly attached to the lower edge of the mold board, and the lower sub-frame being hinged to the upper sub-frame, and at least one spring attached to the lower sub-frame and reactive against the upper sub-frame and acting to hold the two subframes in normal position under normal conditions but permitting the lower sub-frame to pivot on its hinge when the cutting edge encounters resistance suillcient to overcome the power of the spring.

15. In a snow plow having a mold board and a cutting edge separate therefrom, a tripping sub-frame carrying said cutting edge and hinged to the lower end of said mold board, and a plurality of springs attached to the sub-frame and reactive between it and the mold board whereby the cutting edge may be replaced without interfering with the adjustment of the springs, said springs normally maintaining said (cutting edge in cutting position.

-16. In a snow plow having a mold board and a cutting edge separate therefrom, an upper subframe rigidly attached to the lower edge of said mold board, a lower tripping sub-frame carrying said cutting edge, a hinge connection between said sub-frames, and a plurality of springs attached to the lower sub-frame and reactive against the upper sub-frame whereby the cutting edge may be replaced without interfering with the adjustment of the springs, said springs normally maintaining said cutting edge in cutting position.

CARLE D. HENRY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2592240 *Oct 26, 1948Apr 8, 1952Wheel Trueing Tool CoTool bracket and indexing assembly
US2592241 *Apr 23, 1949Apr 8, 1952Wheel Trueing Tool CoWheel dressing unit
US2643470 *Mar 14, 1947Jun 30, 1953Kaeser George LWing plow structure
US2658638 *Feb 18, 1949Nov 10, 1953Hercules Powder Co LtdWood gathering apparatus
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US7467485 *Sep 28, 2004Dec 23, 2008Guy HamelInserted knife fortified snowplow blade
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Classifications
U.S. Classification37/233, 144/34.1, 172/706, 37/279, 37/272, 144/34.6
International ClassificationE01H5/04, E01H5/06
Cooperative ClassificationE01H5/062
European ClassificationE01H5/06B2