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Publication numberUS2055864 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 29, 1936
Filing dateSep 19, 1935
Priority dateSep 19, 1935
Publication numberUS 2055864 A, US 2055864A, US-A-2055864, US2055864 A, US2055864A
InventorsFrank Harsch
Original AssigneeFrank Harsch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Atomizing nozzle
US 2055864 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 29, 1936. F. HARscH 2,055,864

AToMIzING NozzLE Filled Sept. 19, '1935 v BY MATTO/ EY The strainer 31 is conveniently formed of suit-Y ably fine mesh woven wire fabric as indicated by the drawing, the drawing, however, indicating for the sake of clearness a much coarser mesh fabric than is used. The strainer is or cylindrical form open at its forward end, and closed at its rear end, as by a piece of mesh having a ange which fits within the end of the cylinder and is soldered or otherwise secured in place. The forward end of the screen is connected to an inwardly and outwardly flanged ring 38 by which the strainer is secured in position within the body I0. As shown, the strainer has an outturned flange at its forward end which is clamped between the inwardly extending fiange of the holding ring 38 and a frictionally held clamping ring 39. The outwardly extending flange of the holding ring 38 seats on the vforward end of the body l0 and is clamped between the end of the body and the flange J5 of the tip i5 when the cap nut is screwed on the body to clarrnyg) these parts together. The cylindrical strainer and the spring 35 are of such relative size that the spring fits fairly closely within the strainer so as to hold the strainer against collapse under the pressure of the infiowing liquid even when the strainer has become very much clogged after long use.

When the device is in use, the oil or other liquid supplied under pressure to the interior of the body i passes through the strainer El?, thence through the passages 28 and through the straining passage 34 to the channel formed by the groove 33 from which the liquid, still under substantially its original pressure, flows through the tangential grooves 3i) to the whirl chamber 28 from which it is discharged through the orifice i9. The liquid in the whirl chamber 2S because of its entering the chamber tangentially, has awhirling motion in the chamber, and because of this whirling motion and the pressure in the chamber, as the liquid leaves the discharge orifice I9 it is immediately atomized and advances from the orifice in theform of a cone.

As is customary with spray nozzles of the type referred to, the cross-area oi the discharge orifice il is substantially less than the aggregate cross-area of the tangential grooves 3Q, so that while the flow capacity of the grooves is small enough to obtain a ow velocity of the streams of liquid issuing tangentially therefrom into the chamber 28 sufcient to causes, rapid whirling of the liquid in the chamber, their aggregate cross-area is enough greater than the cross-area of the discharge orifice so that the pressure o the liquid in the chamber will be sufficient to cause the desired forcible discharge of the iidn uid through the orifice. For example, for a discharge orifice of about .013 inch diameter the tangential grooves 30 may be about .008 inch wide by about .008 inch deep, and the width between the tip face it? and the plug surface 32 of the annular straining passage may be about .003 inch.

It is sometimes desirable to dispense with the.

cylindrical strainer 31. In order that the nozzle may be used without this strainer, the bore of the body I0 is formed with a shoulder 40 and a conical spring 35a, the rear end of which seats on this shoulder, is provided, as shown in Fig. 3, to serve in place of the spring 35 of Fig. 1 for holding the plug 25 within the recess of the tip. The straining passage 3d will then serve to prevent the passing of particles which might obstruct the tangential grooves 30, and although this straining passage will then require to be cleaned more often than when the nozzle is provided with a strainer such as 3i, it will still operate for long periods without cleaning unless the oil or other liquid passing through it is unusually dirty, or, in the case of an oil burner nozzle, there is a more rapid formation of carbon than usual.

i The tip and plug should be made of a suitable hard heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant material, such as a suitable stainless steel, but the housing body and cap nut need not be of such special material. g I have made these parts of brass, as is customary for the housings of nozzles of the kind referred to.

It will be seen that the only threaded parts of the new nozzle are the two housing members, and that the two parts, the tip and the plug, which are the only parts which may need to be renewed within the ordinary useful life of a nozzle of this kind, require no threading and are of such form as to be comparatively inexpensive to make. It will also be seen that the construction of the nozzle is such that it is very easy to turn the tangentially grooved surface of the plug against the seating face of the tip for the purpose of grinding off carbon formed on the seating face opposite the tangential flow-directing grooves.

What is claimed is:

l. A spray nozzle, comprising a housing including a body part having an externally threaded end and a cap nut on said end having a clamping flange and a central opening, a strainer within the housing having a, cylindrical wall of fine wire mesh carried by a holding ring seated against the end. of the housing body, a tip member seated against said holding ring, the holding ring and the tip member being clamped against the end of the housing body by the cap nut, the tip member having a central recess the walls of which extend first axially and then conically to an axial discharge orifice, a plug slidably fitting within the recess and having its forward end of frusto-conical shape to seat surface to surface against the conical surface of the tip recess and to provide a whirl chamber adjacent the discharge orifice and having a plurality of grooves in its conical seating surface for directing liquid tangentially into the whirl chamber, and a helical spring seated within the strainer and bearing against the plug to hold the plug seated within the tip recess.

Y2. A spray nozzle, comprising a housing, a tip member at the end of the housing having an axial discharge orifice and an interior conical surface extending from the orifice, and a plug member having a frusto-conical end seated surface to surface against the conical surface of the tip member and providing a whirl chamber adjacent the discharge orifice and having a plurality of grooves in its conical seating surface for directing liquid tangentially into the whirl chamber and having an annular surface separated from its conical seating surface by an annular channelforming groove, said annular surface being spaced from the surface of the tip member to provide an annular straining passage the width of which is substantially less than any cross-dimension of said grooves.

acogerse t. s. spray nozzle, comprising a housing, a tip member at theend of the housing having an axial discharge orifice and an interior conical surface extending from the orifice and an interior cylin drical surface rearward of the conical surface. and a plug member having a cylindrical body part to fit the cylindrical surface of the tip member and cut away to provide flow passages and having a frusto-conical end seated surface to surface against the conical surface of the tip member and providing a whirl chamber adjacent the discharge l orifice and having a plurality of grooves in its conical seating surface for directing liquid tann gentially into the whirl chamber and having icetween its cylindrical body part and its conical seating surface an annular surface separated from its conical seating surface by an annular channelforzning groove, said annular surface being spaced from the surface of the tip member to provide an annular straining passage the width-of which is substantially less than any cross-dimension of said. grooves.

e. A spray nozzle, comprising a, housing including a body part having an externally threaded end and a cap nut on said end having a clamp ing flange and a central opening, a tip member held at the end of the housing body by the can nut, said tip member having an axial discharge orifice and an annular surface about the orifice, a plug member having an annular surface to seat against said annular surface of the tip mem- 'her and shaped to provide within said annular surfaces a circular chamber concentric with the discharge orifice, one oi said annuler surfaces having a. plurality of grooves for directing liquid tangentially into said circular chamber, a strainer having a cylindrical wall of fine wire mesh within the housing carried by a holding ring clamped between the tip member and the end of the nous ing body, and a helical spring within the strainer fitting therein to support the cylindrical wall thereof and reacting between the strainer and the plug member to hold the plug member seated against said annular surface of the tip member.

5. A spray nozzle, comprising a housing, a tip member at the end ci the housing having-an axial discharge orice, a slidahly mounted plug member having its forward end shaped to form with the wall ofthe tip member a whirl chamber adjacent the discharge orifice and having an annular surface to seat against an annular surface of the tip member about the Whirl chamber, one of said annular surfacesbeing 'grooved to provide passages for directing liquid tangenetially into the whirl chamber, a strainer having a cylindrioal wall of fine Wire mesh within the housing held against movement relatively to the tip member, and a helical spring Within the strainer-fitting therein to support the cylindrical wall thereof and serving to hoidthe plug member seated against the conical surface of the tip member.

t. A spray nozzle, comprising a housing, a tip member detachahly mounted at the end of the housing having a central recess and an axial discharge orifice opening from the recess, a plug slidably fitting within the tip recess and having its forward end shaped to form with the vvallv of the tip recess a whirl chamber adjacent the discharge orice and having an annular surface to seat against en annular surface of the tip recess about the whirl chamber,'one of said annular surfaces being grooved to provide passages for directing liquid tangentially into the whirl chamber, the plughaving also a part spaced outwardly from its said annular surface providing a surface in liquid straining relation with a part of the surface of the tip recess, said last mentioned surfaces being separated from the annular surfaces adjacent the Whirl chamber by a chan nel-forming groove from which the liquid enters the grooves which direct the liquid tangentially and a spring mounted within the housing and serving to hold the plug seated in the tip recess.

FRANK HARSCH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2494590 *Aug 20, 1945Jan 17, 1950Westinghouse Electric CorpAtomizing structure
US2503481 *Dec 4, 1946Apr 11, 1950William W HallinanAtomizing nozzle
US2556050 *Jan 15, 1947Jun 5, 1951Z & W Machine Products IncSpray attachment for fluid containers
US2568878 *Mar 13, 1948Sep 25, 1951Eureka Williams CorpOil burner nozzle
US2568880 *Apr 21, 1948Sep 25, 1951Eureka Williams CorpOil burner nozzle
US2618511 *Mar 18, 1949Nov 18, 1952Spraying Systems CoStirrup nozzle
US2633386 *Feb 18, 1950Mar 31, 1953Frank D MahoneyCombination nozzle, check valve, and strainer
US2681829 *Jun 13, 1952Jun 22, 1954Spraying Systems CoSpray nozzle strainer or the like
US2958399 *Apr 12, 1956Nov 1, 1960Bendix CorpSystem for cooling kinetic-energyabsorbing devices
US2987262 *Nov 24, 1959Jun 6, 1961Lodding Engineering CorpRemovable and replaceable shower device
US3054563 *Jul 29, 1959Sep 18, 1962Steinen William FFlat spray atomizing nozzle
US3116879 *Jan 30, 1962Jan 7, 1964Charles S Tanner CompanySpray head for spray gun
US3409000 *Sep 19, 1966Nov 5, 1968Redi Fire Heating IncSystem for heating large volumes of air
US3672578 *Aug 20, 1970Jun 27, 1972Delavan Manufacturing CoNozzle
US4384679 *Feb 13, 1981May 24, 1983Marian SikoraBurner nozzle
US4465238 *Sep 4, 1981Aug 14, 1984Jhina PatelFilter for hot air nozzle
US4588131 *Mar 2, 1984May 13, 1986Yamaho Kogyo Co., Ltd.Nozzle for spraying agricultural chemicals
US5423488 *May 11, 1994Jun 13, 1995Davidson Textron Inc.Spray apparatus for mixing, atomizing and spraying foam forming components
US6953161 *Nov 25, 2003Oct 11, 2005Danfoss A/SNozzle, especially an atomizing nozzle for an oil burner
US8268354Nov 6, 2008Sep 18, 2012Aridis PharmaceuticalsSonic low pressure spray drying
US8673357Aug 14, 2012Mar 18, 2014Aridis PharmaceuticalsSonic low pressure spray drying
DE10256533B4 *Dec 4, 2002May 18, 2006Danfoss A/SDüse, insbesondere Zerstäubungsdüse für Ölbrenner
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/462, 188/264.00E, 239/493, 126/113, 239/590.5
International ClassificationB05B1/34
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/3442
European ClassificationB05B1/34A3B4D