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Publication numberUS2057920 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1936
Filing dateOct 12, 1931
Priority dateOct 12, 1931
Publication numberUS 2057920 A, US 2057920A, US-A-2057920, US2057920 A, US2057920A
InventorsWilliam Rose
Original AssigneeWilliam Rose
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stitching machine
US 2057920 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Uct. 20, 1936. w. ROSE STITCHING MACHINE- Original Filed Oct. 12, 1931 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVEN TOR. 0/77 Pose AT RNEY STITCHING MACHINE ed Oct. 12, 1951 5 SheecsSheet 2 Original Fil q 7 $1, 1; 6 i \fl', av. 8 13 N. an

20 k. INVENTOR.

Oct. 20, 1936. w. ROSE STITCHING MACHINE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Original Filed 001:. 12, 1931 l INVENTOR. h/M/iam Ease Patented Oct. 20, 1936 UNHTED STATES PATENT OFFICE Application October 12, 1931, Serial No. 568,399 Renewed January 3, 1934 26 Claims. (o1. 112 s This invention relates to stitching machines such as are used for making rugs, tapestries and the like in which the stitches are applied to a canvas or burlap backing according to the design desired. In making rugs, tapestries and the like by applying loop stitches to a canvas or burlap backing a loop was ordinarily inserted within the meshes of the burlap and the loop inserting instrument was then withdrawn.

However, it was usually desirable to cut the loopto give a cut pile effect, but this cutting operation usually had to be carried out by hand after the loop stitches had been applied in a desired design or pattern.

5 In addition, it was not possible to use a variety of materials for making the stitches such as pieces of fabric or rags, due to the limitations of the apparatus employed, and due to the difficulties of holding the loops in position after they had been formed and while they were being cut.

An object of the present invention is to provide a mechanism adapted for either hand utilization or machine utilization, which may be used for making rugs, tapestries and the like,

which machine will be of inexpensive construction and will not be readily deranged, even though subjected to considerable handling and usage, which will accurately hold the loops in position in the burlap both when the loop is being formed and when the loop forming mechanism is being withdrawn from the loop.

Another object is to provide a stitching machine of the character above-described which will make loop stitches and will out such loop stitches by a single operation, said machine being of relatively simple construction and of relatively low cost.

Another object is to provide an inexpensive and simple apparatus for making rugs, tapestries and the like particularly which is to apply a design or pattern to canvas or burlap backing by means of loop stitches, which mechanism will be adapted to handle a wide variety of stitching materials, such as rags, strips of cloth, yarn and so forth. 7

Other objects will be obvious and will appear during the course of the following specification.

In accomplishing the above objects a stitching'machine construction has been provided with a plurality of longitudinally reciprocating members, one of which provides an opening between the warp and weft threads of the canvas or burlap backing; a second of which inserts a loop in said backing, and the third of which cuts the loop, these members being preferably successively operated in the order described.

In a manually actuated stitching mechanism it is most convenient to employ one manual grip device to insert the opening member in the 5 backing material while another manual actuator may be provided for successively operating the stitching and cutting members.

In the preferred embodiment preferably in association with these longitudinally operating 10 members are a plurality of stitch holding members, one of which is adapted to retain the halfiormed stitch previously made, while the new stitch is being formed, and the other of which is adapted to hold the stitching material being 15 fed after it has been inserted in the fabric to form a loop. These holding members or means are preferably so arranged that they will release the thread or stitching material during the stitching action so that it may be readily fed through the backing, while at the same time they will hold the loop firmly against distention during the cutting operation and also prevent the half formed stitch from being drawn out when the next loop is being formed by the pulling efiect of the looping member.

The above and other objects will appear more clearly from the following detailed description, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate one embodiment 30 of the inventive idea.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the machine in position before the members are moved;

Fig. 2 is a plan View of the machine from the 35 top corresponding to Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a detail in section of a spring support for the needle;

Fig. 4 is a plan view from the bottom corresponding to Fig. 1; 40

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal section on line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a detail showing a ratchet mechanism mounted on the slide;

Fig. '7 is a section on line ll, Fig, 5; 45

Fig. 8 is a section on line 8-8, Fig. 5;

Fig. 9 is a longitudinal section of the mechanism at the start of the stitching operation;

Fig. 10 is a longitudinal section of the mechanism at the completion of the stitching action; 50

Fig. 11 is a longitudinal section of the mechanism after the cutting action is completed; and the next stitch is about to be made;

Fig. 12 is a detail showing the ratchet action in the released position; 55

Fig. 13 is another detail showing the ratchet in the disengaged position;

Fig. 14 is an enlarged detail showing one form of point for the cutting member; and

Fig. 15 shows one form of point for the stitching needle.

The machine as illustrated in the drawings above described comprises a frame with a suitable handle at one end and terminating in the pointed guide at the opposite end. The point of this guide is inserted in the fabric and the members are operated back and forth within the guide by the action of the slide or driving mechanism. The yarn is suitably fed through the guide so as to be engaged by the forward movement of the stitching needle which thus inserts the yarn through the fabric leaving a loop when the needle is withdrawn. 3

In this invention a second member is brought into operation after the loop has been formed and by the continued motion of the mechanism this member cuts the loop so that the machine performs a complete stitching and cutting action in each operation. In this operation an escapement provided in the mechanism releases the stitching needle from the driving action of the machine while the cutting member is moved forward into action.

A clamp is provided tohold the last stitch in place when the machine is in operation and a second clamp is provided which is brought into action to clamp the feeding end of the yarn during the-time the cutting member is in action so that both ends of the loop are held in tension when the loop is being cut. The second clamp is operated by a ratchet mechanism so that the yarn is released as soon as the cutting action is completed thereby avoiding any tendency to withdraw the feeding end of the yarn from the fabric as the mechanism is changed for the next step.

In the manufacture of rugs by the loop stitch as referred to a great deal of time is consumed in cutting the loops after the stitching is completed, with the present machine this labor is avoided.

In the drawings, II is the frame of the machine which is constructed in the form of a rectangular bar upon which the slide operates. This frame is connected with the handle l2 and has the hollow guide l3 mounted on the lower end. The slide I4 is preferably made from a piece of bent stock as indicated, with one leg |5 extended to form a handle. The slide moves freely on the frame H andhas mounted thereon a presser foot l6 formed of wire and arranged to engage the fabric b when the sitch is being made. The yarn a is fed through suitable eyes and into an opening l8 in the needle guide l3 and a clamp H is provided to clamp the yarn against |3a when the cutting member is in action. The needle guide I3 is provided with a foot I9, preferably faced with soft rubber which engages the last stitch c and holds the yarn forming this stitch in place while the machine is in operation.

The guide I3 is provided with a hollow point 20 which is inserted in the fabric b and forms an aperture in the fabric for the yarn and for the needle and cutting member. The stitching member is indicated by 2| and the lower member 22 is the cutting member, these members being operated by the slide I4. Member 22 is rigidly secured to the slide by the offset portion 38 and the upturned end 39 Which-enters an aperture in the slide and-is held in place by spring 40. The stitching needle 2| is operated by the slide l4 during the preliminary movement of the slide and is then released from the slide. This needle, as indicated in Figs. 1, 9, 10 and 11, is bent at right angles at 3|, passes through a slot 33 in the frame H and terminates in the T head 32. bent portion 3| is engaged by the edge of the curved channel 34 formed in the slide |4 thereby causing the needle to move with the slide until the T head engages the incline 35 on the frame II. This deflects the needle against the action of the flat spring 31 and disengages the shoulder of 3| from 34 so that the needle passes into the channel 34 thus arresting its motion by this escapement as the movement of the slide is continued.

It will be observed that in the mechanism thus far described, the needle 2| and member 22. move together as indicated in Fig. 9 until the loop is formed and the cutting member 22 being shorter than 2| does not injure the strands of the yarn. The continued movement of the slide, after the loop is formed, moves the cutting member only as indicated in Fig. 10 where the member 22 is projected beyond the needle 2| and has cut the yarn or; at d. V I

The needle 2| is preferably formed with a blunt curved edge as indicated at 2|a in Fig. 15 so as to form a channel for the yarn it below the curved channel of guide |3 as indicated in the longitudinal sectional drawings. The member 22 is preferably fiat shaped to slide on the needle 2| and has a forked cutting edges as indicated The guide l3 and the spring'53 are clamped by plate 52 and screw 5| to the frame .The spring 53 is bent upon itself having an upper section 54 which supports the U-shaped clamp H, which, when in the depressed position clamps the yarn a against |3a asindicated in Fig. 10.

In the position shown in Fig. 5, the

An aperture is provided at 55 in the slide to clear the incline 35 and the spring 54. During the stitching movement of the slide which has just been completed in Fig. 9, the spring 54 is not depressed and the yarn is free to be fed to the loop.

When the slide has advanced to the cutting position as indicated in Fig. 10 the spring 54 is depressed to bring the clamp into action. This is secured by the ratchet dogs, Figs. 6, 12 and 13, which are mounted on the end l5 through the pivot 58 and comprise the dogs 56 and 51 held in tension by spring 59 and restrictedby the stop 60. A shoulder is formed on each dog at 3| which engagesthe spring 54 and depresses the spring as these dogs move forward on the incline. The spring 54 is notched as indicated at 82-62, Fig. 2, so that when the dogs 56 and 51 cut. Upon the return of the slide M the inclined shoulder 63 of spring 54 forces the dogs 56 and 51 apart as indicated in Fig. 13 so that onthe return movement of'the slide theclamp |1 is'not brought into action.

In the operation of the machine, the yarn a is threadedthrough the clamp and the aperture I8 and around the end of the'needles. The point 20 is then inserted in the fabric and the slide moved down which first forms the loop stitch as indicated in Fig. 9, then clamps the feeding end of the yarn at I1, stops the movement of the stitching needle and moves forward the cutting member until the loop is cut, then the clamp I1 is released, the presser foot I6 is held against the fabric and the frame is withdrawn until the point 20 is clear of the fabric when the machine is tilted as indicated in Fig. 11 to bring the point 20 into position for another stitch. The point 20 is then inserted in the fabric and the slide is raised to withdraw the members, and as the slide is moved down again the members are brought into alignment with the point 20 and thus a new stitch is made. The width of the stitch is determined by the extent of the deflection of point 20 in the position shown in Fig. 11. This in turn is determined by the free movement of the members permitted by the shoe 42, hence if it is desired to vary the size of the stitches all that is necessary is to change shoe 42 to permit the necessary movement between the lugs 43 and the frame N, Fig. 3.

This invention can be applied in a variety of forms by those skilled in the art to which it pertains and includes a full range of equivalents and alternatives. i

It is apparent that the functions of the opening member l3, the stitching member 2| and the cutting member 22 might be combined in less than three longitudinal reciprocating members if desired, and it is also apparent that one or more of the members I3, 2| and 22 might be omitted. Other means of protecting the backing b from being out than the tubular means l3 shown may be provided and if desired the forked cutter 22 might be arranged to be inserted in the backing b, without danger of cutting the warp and weft threads thereof. The members 2| and 22 might be combined so that the stitching member 2| would have the action of the cutting member 22 upon the loop when it has formed.

In place of the holding means IQ for the halfformed loop and the holding means |3a|'| for the stitching material a, other holding means may be provided to replace the holders |3a., I! and I9 as shown. The holder I9 may be modified so as to grip the half-formed loop C positively in respect to the backing b if desired. As is apparent from Figs. '7, 8 and 15, the needle 2| may be readily shaped to receive strips of materials, whether straight, folded or twisted, as well as the round yarn as shown. 7

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a hollow point engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame and a pair of members operated by said slide and moving in said hollow point, one of said members applying stitches to the fabric and the other member cutting the stitch and means for moving the cutting member to a greater extent than the stitching member by said slide.

2. In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a hollow point engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide'moving relative to said frame and a pair of members operated by said slide and moving in said hollow point, one of said members applying stitches to the fabric andthe other membercutting the stitch by a continued movement of the slide after the stitch is formed.

3. In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a hollow point engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame and a pair of members operated by said slideand moving in said hollow point, one of said members having a stitching action and the other member having a cutting action on the stitch.

4. Ina stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a hollow point engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame and a pair of members operated by said slide and moving in said hollow point, said members being moved together during part' of'the operation of said machine and one of said members moving independently of the other during another part of the operation of said machine and cutting the stitch after it is formed.

5. In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a hollow point engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame and a pair of members operated by said slide and moving'in said ho-llow point and an escapement for stopping the motion of one of said members when the stitch is formed while the other member moves with the slide to cut the stitch.

6. In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a hollow point engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative tosaid frame and a pair of members operated by said slide and moving in said hollow point, one of said members forming a stitch and a cam on said frame controlling said member to release it from movement with said slide and theother member cutting the stitch formed by the first member. 7. In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a' hollow point engagingthe fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame,.a needle for making a loop stitch operated by said slide and a member operated by said slide in said hollow point for cutting the loop of said stitch by a forward movement of said member.

8. In a stitching machine, the combination of-a frame with a hollow point engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame, a needle for making a loop stitch operated by said slide and a second member having a cutting edge at the end operated by said slide in said hollow point for cutting the loop of said stitch by a forward movement of said second member.

9. ma stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a hollow point engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame, a needlefor making a loop stitch operated by said slide, means operated by said slide in said hollow point for cutting the loop of said stitch, and means for securing said stitch during the cutting operation against the action of the cutting means.

l0. In:a stitching'machine, the combination of a frame with a needle guide engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame, a needle for making a loop stitch operated by said slide, a second member for'cutting said loopand means for holding both ends of the stitch during the cutting operation.

11. In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a needle guide engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame, a needle for making loop stitches operated by said slide, means associated with said slide'for, cutting each loop stitch'and means op erated by said slide for securing the stitch during the cutting operation against the pull of the cutting means.

12. In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a needle guide engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame, aVneedle-for. making'loop stitches operated by saidslide, means for cutting each loop stitch and means operative during the cutting operation forsecuring the stitch in the fabric against being pulled out by the cutting action.

13. In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a needle guide engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame, a; needle for making loop stitches and a member for cutting each loop operatively connected with said slide and moving in said guide and a spring controlled shoe holding said needle and member in alignment with said guide and engaging the stitch.

14; In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a needle guide engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame, a needle operated by said slide and moving in said guide and a spring controlled shoe engaging the stitch for normally holding said needle in alignment with said guide and limit ing the deflection of said needle relative to said guide whereby the length of the stitch is regulated.

15. In a stitching machine, the combination of.

a frame with a needle guide and yarn guide engaging the fabric to be stitched, a slide moving relative to said frame, means for forming a loop stitch and means for cutting said stitch after it is formed operated by said slide and clamping means for clamping said yarn on both sides of the point where it is cut during the cutting part of said operation. I

16. In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a slide thereon, a needle operated by said slide for forming a stitch, means including an inclined plane on said frame inclined in the direction of movement of said slide for disengaging saidneedle from said slide after the stitch is formed and a member secured to and operating with said slide and having a cutting edge arranged to out said stitch after the stitch is formed, by the movement of said slide.

17. In a stitching machine, the combination of a frame with a slide thereon, a needle for forming a stitch operatively engaged by said slide, a channel in said slide, means for deflecting said needle into said channel to disengage it from said slide at a predetermined position in the movement of said slide and a member secured to and operating with said slide arranged to out said stitch after it is formed.

18. In' a stitching machine, the combination of a frame witha slide thereon, a yarn guide for the feeding end of the yarn, a needle operated by said slide for forming a stitch from said yarn, means for releasing said needle from movement with the slide after the stitch is formed and means operated by said slide for clamping the feeding end of the yarn after the stitch is formed. a

19. In a stitching machine, the combinationof a frame with a slide thereon, a needleoperated by said slide for forming a stitch from a threadof yarn, means for releasing said needle from movement with said slide after the stitch is formed and means operated by the .movement of the slide in one direction only for clamping the yarn.

3.20." In astitching machine, the combination of a frame with a slide thereon, a needle operated by said slide .for. forming astitch from a thread of yarn; meansfor releasing saidineedle from movement with said slide afterthe. stitch is formed,- a member moving with said slide arranged to cut the stitch after it is formed and means operatedjby said slide for clamping the feeding end of the yarn during the cutting operation only.

21. In astitching machine for inserting loop stitches in abacking fabric and for cutting such loop. stitches, a frame provided with a member for engaging thefabric to be stitched and for providing an opening therein, a stitching member inserting arloop of the stitching material .through said opening and a cutting member actuatedsubsequently, to said stitching member for cutting said loop, said cutting member severing the loop by movement of the cutting means longitudinally of the loop. 7

22. Ina stitching machine for inserting loop stitches inabacking fabric and for cutting such loop stitches, a frame provided with a member for engaging thefabric to be stitched and for providing an opening therein, a stitching member insertinga loop of the stitching material through,

saidopeningand a cutting member actuated subsequently togsaid stitching member forycutting said loop, said cutting member and said stitching member being relatively laterally extended and being further provided at their operative ends inserted through the openings in the backing with notches,the notch of the stitching member being relatively dull to carry the stitch and the notch-in the cutting member being relatively sharp to sever the loop formed by the stitching member. r r

23. In a stitching machine for inserting loop stitches in a backing-fabric and for cutting said loop stitches after formation, means for succes-' sively providing an opening in the backing fabric, for inserting a loop in said opening and for cutting said loop after it has been formed, said cutting means including a forked cutter consisting of a laterally extending member adapted to be inserted in said opening and means for advancing said forked cutter after said loop has been formed longitudinally of the loop to out said loop. 24, In a'stitching machine for inserting loop stitches in a backing fabric and for cutting such loop stitches, a frame provided with a member for engaging the fabric to be stitched and for providing an opening therein, a stitching member inserting a loop of the stitching material through said opening and a cutting member actuated subsequently to said stitching member for, cutting saidloop, said cutting member and said stitching member being relatively laterally extended and being further provided at their operative ends inserted through the openings in the backing with notches, the notch of the stitching member being relatively dull to carry the stitch and the notch in the cutting member being relatively sharp to sever the loop formed by the stitching member, and a shoe controlled by a spring for clampingthe stitching material'to the backing during the process of making and cutting said loop stitch. I 1 I 7 V '25. In a stitching machine for inserting loop stitches in a backing fabric and for cutting said loop stitches after formation, means'for successively providing an-opening in the backing fabric, for inserting a loopv in said opening and for cutting said, loop afterit has been formed, said cutmeans provided to ting means including a forked cutter consisting of a laterally extending member adapted to be inserted in said opening and means for advancing said forked cutter after said loop has been formed longitudinally of the loop to out said loop and prevent the half formed out stitch from being pulled out by the cutting member during the process of completing said half formed out stitch.

26. In a stitching machine for inserting loop stitches in a backing fabric and for cutting said loop stitches after formatio means for successively providing an opening in the backing fabric, for inserting a loop in said opening and for cutting said loop after it has been formed, said cutting means including a forked cutter consisting of a laterally extending member adapted to be inserted in said opening and means for advancing said forked cutter after said loop has been formed longitudinally of the loop to out said loop with means for clamping the stitching end of the material to the backing fabric, said clamping means consisting of a spring controlled l0 shoe.

WILLIAM ROSE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2591939 *Oct 12, 1950Apr 8, 1952Rugerofters IncCarpet tufting and pile cutting device
US3095840 *Sep 5, 1957Jul 2, 1963Lees & Sons Co JamesMethod for tufting pile fabrics
US3142276 *Jun 25, 1962Jul 28, 1964Roger H Mullen IncDevice for forming cut pile fabrics and the like
US3144844 *Oct 11, 1962Aug 18, 1964Cabin Crafts IncPortable machine for tufting cut pile
US3372661 *Jun 7, 1965Mar 12, 1968Glenn LooperPortable pile-depositing machine
US3802359 *Apr 7, 1972Apr 9, 1974Rug CraftersOne-handed tufting tool
US3977336 *Nov 11, 1975Aug 31, 1976Lawrence Peska Associates, Inc.Motorized rug hooking needle
US4132182 *Aug 8, 1977Jan 2, 1979Heemstra Theodore CTufting machine
US4267784 *Nov 30, 1979May 19, 1981Heemstra Theodore CTufting machine
US7955194Dec 28, 2009Jun 7, 2011Textile Management Associates, Inc.Golf mat
US20080124496 *Feb 6, 2008May 29, 2008Textile Management Associates, Inc.Artificial turf with granule retaining fibers
US20100105497 *Dec 28, 2009Apr 29, 2010Textile Management Associates, Inc.Golf mat
US20110020567 *Jan 27, 2011Textile Management Associates, Inc.Artificial turf with granule retaining fibers
US20110171401 *Jul 14, 2011Charles CookSynthetic Sports Turf Having Lowered Infill Levels
US20110201442 *Aug 18, 2011Textile Management Associates, Inc.Golf Mat
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/80.5, 112/80.55
International ClassificationD05C15/06, D05C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationD05C15/06
European ClassificationD05C15/06