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Publication numberUS2058070 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1936
Filing dateFeb 20, 1932
Priority dateFeb 20, 1932
Publication numberUS 2058070 A, US 2058070A, US-A-2058070, US2058070 A, US2058070A
InventorsElkin Jo P G
Original AssigneeElkin Jo P G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for packing articles and materials
US 2058070 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 20, 1936. J. P. G. ELKlN 2,053,070

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PACKING ARTICLES AND MATERIALS Filed Feb. 20, 1952 JoRGBh'n Patented Oct. 20, 1936 UNITED STATES METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PACKING ARTICLES AND MATERIALS Jo P. G. Elkin, Tampa, Fla.

Application February 20, 1932, Serial No. 594,358 4 Claims. (Cl. 206-40) The primary object of the present invention is to provide antattractive yet inexpensive display pack for delicate and easily injured articles, as a means for preserving them in their best condition while permitting them to be seen clearly. I

The device selected as an illustrative example is a pack for strawberries in which the berries are arranged to show a selected top layer carefully set to project a little way above the top of the container as is customary, but this pack differing from the ordinary basket pack in the provision of a complete covering of waterproof and dust-proof transparent sheet material, such as those known as Cellophane, acetylcellulose, or glassine, surrounding the fruit and covered, except the top layer, by the basket, permitting the basket to be removed for inspection of the fruit and replaced without disarranging the fruit or subjecting it to contamination.

There are many other delicate fruits and vegetables which can be kept in a much more sanitary condition by the use of the present pack than when they are handled in the usual manner, and other less perishable food products, as candies, candied fruits, raisins, and nuts, may be packed in the manner herein described with great advantage, the exposed surface in each case being an unbroken sheet of transparent ma: terial without a seam or fold, protecting the articles from contact with deleterious matter while displaying them in the most attractive form.

Where transparency is not so desirable or is not necessary, other suitable flexible materials may replace the transparent fllm covering the packed articles or material within the heavier container, while still leaving a smooth and unbroken top surface suitablefor receiving a printed advertisement.

A further object of the invention is the provision ot a method of applying a flexible material 'in sheets to a definite quantity of material or articles to be packed in a predetermined space relation, so that the sheet may be made to enclose-the packed material ready for insertion into a relatively rigid containenwith the pack fitting the container.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a device to hold the protective sheet while the display layer is being assembled, this device not only serving to define the size of the primary layer, but also acting to hold the flexible sheet material in place and forming a gage or measure for the rest of the articles or material to be packed upon the primary layer.

Other objects will appear in connection with the description of the drawing forming a part of this specification, it being evident that many changes may be made in details of the structure to suit difierent conditions.

In the drawing, Figure 1 is a plan view of a holder having its hinged ends and sides folded open; Fig. 2 is a section on the line 22 of Fig. 1, with the central portion broken away and with one of the sides and one of the ends shown as lifted into erect oroperative position; Figs. 3 to 'l are diagrammatic views in section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1 but on a smaller scale, illustrating successive steps in the process of forming the pack, certain parts being omitted; Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the pack ready to receive the basket; and Fig. 9 is a perspective view of the pack in the basket after being-inverted into its normal position.

in its lowered position as indicated on the left in 20 Fig. 2, where the side 4 has the end of its extension 6 bearing near the end of the spring 'I, or acting to hold the member in its erect or operative position, as shown at the right in Fig. 2, where the side 5 has its extension 6 bearing sidewise against the central portion of the spring I.

In swinging a side or end on its pivot from one position to the other, the spring will yield readily, but will be strong enough to hold the pivoted member with reasonable firmness in either position. The pivoted members are limited in their outward or downward swing by contact of their outer surfaces with the upper surface of the base, and they are limited in their upward swing and held at the proper angle by contact of the extension 0 with the under surface of the base near the hinge, as will be apparent in Fig. 2.

With the hinged sides and ends folded down as indicated in Figs. 1 and 3, a sheet 8 of Cellophane or other suitable flexible material is laid with its central portion over the central portion 9 of the base I, with its side margins overlapping substantially equally on both sides. Where the articles are to project above the rigid container, this central portion 9 of the base will be made in the form of a shallow basin of a depth suited to the amount of elevation desired in the finished pack. Using this portion 9 as a measure and guide, the packer will lay the articles upside down upon the sheet 8 in any desired arrangement for proper display of this primary layer which will form the top or display layer in the pack when completed.

After this display layer has been placed upon the sheet, the sides 4 and 5 are swung upward on their hinges as indicated in Fig. 4, carrying the sheet with them in smooth contact with the sides. The sheets will have wide enough margins l0 to provide a sufiicient overlap when folded together as indicated in Figs. 5 to '7.

The ends 2 and 3 are also swung upward, the position of the end 2 being shown in Fig. 2. The

sheet 8 will have an end margin H at each end a little narrower than the height of the ends 2 and 3, as indicated in Fig. 6, and these margins will also lie smoothly in contact with the ends 2 and 3, leaving the surplus material II projecting at the corners as suggested in Fig. 4.

With the sides and ends in the elevated position supporting the flexible sheet, the remaining articles or material to be packed will be placed upon the display layer substantially to the height of the tops of the sides and ends, as indicated in Fig. 4. The margins I 0 will then be folded over the top as shown in Fig. 5.

The views in Figs. 3, 4 and 5 are taken as just inside the margin II that lies in contact with the end 3, so that in those figures, the end 3 and the margin II are not visible. In Fig. 6, the view is taken as just outside of the margin ll, while in Fig. 7, the surplus l2 at the corners has been folded in against the end of the pack and the projecting ends of the margins I 0 have been folded down from the top. Before this folding in at the end is done, the hinged end member 3 will be swung down out of the way, the pack being supported by one of the packers hands at that end, if necessary, while the other hand presses the sheet into place. The end member 3 may then be swung back to hold the folded end while the other end is treated in a similar manner. With articles that have a tendency to slide freely, as shelled lima beans or shelled peas, the holder may be tilted or stood on end while the sheet is being folded in at the end.

It will be seen that although the protective wrapping material may be a very thin and flexible sheet, the rigid sides and ends of the holder serve as firm supports to cause the articles or material being packed to assume just the space relationship they are to retain after they'have been placed in the relatively rigid outer container. When the ends of the protective covering have been folded into place, the pack will be.

held firmly enough by the sheet to permit the sides and ends of the holder to be folded down as shown in Fig. 8, and an outer container l3 whose interior has the dimensions of the pack will then be set down over the sheet and its contents, as indicated in Fig. 8.

When this container with its contents is inverted, the protective sheet 8 will be visible only as a smooth top covering, and in the preferred form in which the sheet 8 is transparent, the display layer will be plainly visible and thoroughly protected.

All folds and overlapped portions of the covering sheet will be concealed by the outer rigid container, and the weight of the contents pressing on the folds of the wrapper which are on the bottom in the normal position, serves to make the wrapper substantially air tight.

Fruit packed in this manner will last much longer, being kept from exposure to the air so that it will not dry out and wilt so quickly. It is also protected from dust, molds, bacteria, and insects and from contact with the hands of those carrying or handling the containers. If desired, it may be readily inspected by inverting the container in ones hand to allow the pack to slide out upon the palm where it may be seen from all sides and replaced in the container without injury to the fruit.

It has been found that fruit packed in this manner remains in good condition under refrigeration much longer than fruit exposed to the air, particularly in the type of refrigeration in which no ice is present to maintain the humidity of the air.

It will be evident that there will be many variations in detail in adapting the process herein disclosed to materials and to containers, and it will be understood that the device herein described is but one of many instrumentalities that may be employed without departing from the inventive principle disclosed herein.

The pack herein set forth furnishes a means and a method by which a thin, flexible, transparent protective sheet covering may be placed upon delicate or easily injured material, in a manner to completely surround the articles or material to be packed, while permitting the arrangement of a display layer to form the top of the completed pack.

I claim:

1. A pack for perishable commodities comprising a sheet of transparent material having a display layer of the commodity arranged substantially in the center of the sheet, the margins of the sheet being disposed at the sides and back of the commodity to form a complete closure therefor, and a container of relatively rigid material having an open side and placed upon the closure in a manner to protect the sides and back and to leave the display layer visible at the open side. a

2. An upside down pack for loose material comprising a flexible sheet having the material placed upon its central portion and having its margins folded and overlapped-to form a complete closure for the material, and a relatively rigid container having closed sides and back and having, an open side and placed removably in contact with the outside of the flexible closure in a manner to leave the central portion of the sheet exposed at the open side and the folded margins within the container.

3. An upside down pack for loose material comprising a flexible sheet having the material placed upon its central portion and having the margins of the sheet folded and overlapped to form a complete closure for the material, and a relatively rigid container having closed lateral walls, a closed bottom wall, and an open top side, said rigid container being placed in contact with the flexible closure in a manner to leave the central portion of the sheet exposed at the open side and the folded margins enclosed within the rigid container.

4. An upside down pack for loose material consisting of a transparent closure and a protective container, the closure comprising a flexible transparent sheet having the material placed upon its central portion and having the margins of the sheet folded and overlapped to form a complete closure for the material capable of being handled for inspection of the material as a completely enclosed unit, and the protective container comprising a relatively rigid removable unit having closed lateral walls, a closed bottom wall, and an open top side, said rigid unit being placed to surround the sides, ends, and bottom of the flexible closure with the folded margins of the sheet enclosed within the rigid container while leaving the central portion of the sheet exposed for display and permitting the removal of the enclosed unit at the open side.

JO P. G. ELIQN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2426783 *Jan 22, 1944Sep 2, 1947Fruit And Produce Packing IncMethod of and container for packing fruit and the like
US5291721 *Aug 10, 1992Mar 8, 1994Highland Supply CorporationCover forming apparatus having pivoting forming members
US5350473 *Nov 30, 1992Sep 27, 1994Highland Supply CorporationCover forming apparatus having pivoting forming members
US5699647 *Nov 6, 1996Dec 23, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Cover forming apparatus having pivoting forming members
US5927045 *Oct 23, 1997Jul 27, 1999Southpac Trust International, Inc.Cover forming apparatus having pivoting forming members
Classifications
U.S. Classification426/124, 53/219, 53/449
International ClassificationB65D81/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/00
European ClassificationB65D81/00