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Publication numberUS2058188 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1936
Filing dateNov 13, 1935
Publication numberUS 2058188 A, US 2058188A, US-A-2058188, US2058188 A, US2058188A
InventorsS. J. S. Stanton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
stanton
US 2058188 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 20, 1936.. s. J. 5. STANLTON 2,058,138

BA'I'HING TANK TY; I I I L16 I Filed Nov. 13, 1935 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 is. J. s. STANTON BATHING TANK 'Oct 20, 1936.

Filed Nov. 13, 1935 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 n T f .z [a 5 3 9a 1/17 BATHING TANK Filed Nov. 13, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Oct. 20,1936. 5. J. s. STANTON BATHING TANK Filed Nov. 15, 1955 5 'SheetsShee t 5 FI L 2 8&8 W

Patented Get. 20, 1936 ear-Eur OFFICEYYJ BATHING TANK Samuel J. Samelow Stanton, Chicago, 111.

Application November 13, 1935, Serial No. 49,545

14 Claims.

This invention introduces for modern home comforts a bathing tank-bathtub--showerstall. It can be used, with constantly changing water, as a bathtub by a person in a reclining position,

, as a showerstall, and as a tank for a bather in a standing position. Home dwellers in the civilized world have enjoyed in successive stages, the wash basin, the bathtub and the showerbath, and now beholdthe bathing tankbathtubshowerstall.

The device, in some respects an improvement on my Patent No. 2,015,021 and my application for Patent No. 747,404, is installable under prevailing plumbing systems, connecting on to the usual hot and cold water and the usual discharge pipes.

Its availability, as afforded in its present novel form, for daily use in transient or permanent abodes adds a refining mechanical convenience never before enjoyed by man.

Its inconspicuousness when installed, as a result of accomplished uniqueness, while lending itself to attractiveness of shape and finish makes it a utility conformable to modern plans of compactness combined with beauty and economy.

The apparatus as a who-1e does not require more bathroom floor space than the conventional bathtub, nordoes it interfere with .any standardized arrangements of bathroom appurtenances.

can be manufactured in enameled iron or any other material used for bathtubs, yielding to any finishes available for other plumbing fixtures.

The foregoing as well as other novel features of this invention will become quite obvious or will suggest themselves for' contemplation as this invention is further disclosed hereinafter in words and figures and by the accompanying numbered illustrations which are made a part of this specification.

In the drawings: Figure 1 shows a perspective view of a bathing tank.

Figure 2 represents a plan view of'the same utility.

Figure 3 is a vertical cross section taken on line 33 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a similar section of a modified form. Figure 5 discloses a sectional view of a portion of a building showing the construction of bathrooms with bathing tanks.

Figure 6 reveals a modified form of bathing tank in section.

section of the bathing tank, a combination waterspout-showerhead. I

Figure 9 is a perspective form of a modified bathing tank. 7

Figure 10 is a fragmentary cross sectional view. ,5

Figure 11 demonstrates in sectional View the bathing tank in conjunction with a characteristic. form of its incorporation into a bathroom.

Figure 12 is a section taken on line l2-l2 in Figure 11. V 3

Referring to the drawings in detail: The numeral l0, Figure 1, points to this novel bathing tank as a whole. It comprises preferably a hollow casting having side walls 262l Figure 1, or 48 and 5! in Figure '7, and end walls 2829 in Figure 1, or as indicated, .by 18 and in Figure 9, which embrace a floor ll, Figure 1, occupying ordinarily the same floor space as the conventional bathtub, but preferably having Walls, 48, 49, 5E! and 5!, which give the vessel sufiicient depth to enable a person to stand substantially shoulder deep under the showerhead, 5,3.

These references show graphically how the device gives the dweller of an ordinary apartment, residence or hotel the facility of a brisk showerbath, a reposeful bath in a reclining position and vigorous bathing in a standing position in continually changing water. e The depth of the bathing tank in excess of the conventional bathtub, its precursor, is made possible by utilizing space through the room floor and over the bathtub under the ceiling of the floor belowon the first floor it is space under the basement ceiling. This space has been boxed in in recent modern bathroom arrangements entirely for efiect, the effect produced in the present invention ,by putting a housing .31) around the lowerpo-rtionbf the vessel protruding through the room floor.

A controlling feature of the present invention is uniqueness of anchorage; Figure 1 discloses the preferred idea. Thisv comprises arms extending from the bathing tank. The arms reaching out from the bathing tank into abutting walls are shown in Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4, as flanges 1.2- in Figures ,6 and 7 as flanges 52. The .arm reaching out from the. tub into the room is shown in Figures 1 and 2 as a floor H for the part of the room 35 not occupied by the bathing tank, which floor rests upon the building floor 32 proper. The same. suspension device is numberedBl in Figure '7 and "M in Figure 9. a

In Figure 9, the anchorage arm extending from the tank is shaped into a window frame ,82, with flanges 83 of said window frame extending 5,5

through the building wall 84. The window flange 83 embraces window 95. This modification of the main anchorage device, with a view to enameled finish, converts the supporting arm into usefulness and beauty.

In Figure 11, the anchorage device assumes the form of a cradle in the shape of a plurality of bands 89, or rods, extending from an abutting wall 92, under the tub 85 and over the part of the room floor 9| not occupied by the tub. Numerals 86, 81. and 88 indicate grooves that might be provided in the tank to receive the bands 89, while 98 indicates a right angle bend in 89 extending into the wall for anchorage.

The inherent quality of beauty as well as utility of this device manifests itself even in the incorporation of these cradle bands. See Figure 12 showing the rods 89 in place between the tile floor covering 94 over the bathroom floor 9i, which suggests the possibility of a variety of bathroom floor designs. The part of bands, or rods, 89, which extend from the tub 85, over the floor 9|, may, instead of maintaining a horizontal position, be extended and bent downward to maintain a vertical position as legs for the cradle 88, 89 and 98, said legs to rest on a support in the room below the tub. This cradle arrangement for supporting the bathing tank in an opening through a floor is designed for anchorage elements separate from-not as a part ofthe tank proper.

The novel bathing tank as here outlined reveals several devices for descent into it. Steps 13-44, Figure 2, located at one end of the tub, or as shown in cross-section in Figure 3, are each substantially of bathtub height, leading by two steps to section 24 of the unit.

Recesses 4245, incorporated in the wall 48 in Figure 6, show foot rests that can be used instead of steps l3l4, which recesses replacing the said step make it possible to have use of the full bathing tank for bathing purposes.

Handle bars 4344 extending over the recessesor nichesd2- l5 suggest further means of foot support for getting in and out of the tub, which handle bars also provide safety means for the bather who finds them always within his reach.

The bathing tank derives its unique characteristics further from the inclusion of water spouts 55 at the top of the chamber, which with the outlets 62, 63, 5! and 61 in Figure 6 in proper coordination, can be kept filled substantially for the full height of the vessel, and by proper manipulation of the handle 54 which controls a header 59 its contents can be kept in continuous circulation, or change of temperature, for purity, comfort and stimulating impulses to body.

For the bather who desires a quick shower, the vessel includes a showerhead 53 either above or below the vessel rim. Figure 8 shows a showerhead 66 in conjunction with a waterspout 10 with a two way valve 85 which arrangement affords water supply through either 0utletthe shower head or water spoutas desired.

For the bather who enjoys the reposeful virtues of a bathtub, the bathing tank includes a compartment 24, recessed from the superimposed compartment 25, by a ledge 12. The facilities for supply and discharge can be used to keep the water in proper depth for the bather to bathe in a reclining position.

This bathtub compartment 24 may be further contoured by having the head end slope as indicated by the dotted line 68 and the sides slope as indicated by the dotted lines 89. 6 and 5.

In Figures 2 and 5, the numeral l5 indicates a depression in the bottom step, which can be used as a head rest, similar to that intended by the head rest as indicated by the dotted line 68.

The floor H, Figures 2 and 5, is provided with upwardly-extended flanges 15 which afford the protection to the bathroom walls usually afforded by baseboards, and in addition to that-where this is made of material like enameled iron the advantage of high finish, sanitation and beauty. A cut out l6a. or 39 may be included in any one of the flanges for a threshold, and the floor, a variation of the floor l l in Figure 1, may embrace openings 40 which can be ornamented with tile settings. The floor may be reinforced by ribs 16b or ll.

The bathing tank herein described embodies other enhancing features, such as a curve front E211 and a panel indentation in the front wall l2b, Figure 1, features which effect the pleasing reactions of the modern bathroom. Characteristics of utility and appeal inherent in the present domestic accession are augmented in several respects by further uniqueness of construction and economy of arrangement. See Figure 2, numerals I9, 29 and 2|. These suggest a plurality of novel drains. See Figure 6, numerals 55 and 53, which suggest a plurality of supply spouts. The unit can by these means be filled up or emptied more quickly than the small bathtub in common use today.

Numeral 61 in Figure 6 indicates an overflow safety opening. Numeral 81 in Figure '7 indicates the inclusion of at least two such safety overflow openings, which device suggests means for complete overflow control. Numeral ll, Figures l and 2, point out a form of safety handle bars, a variation of 43 in Figure 6. Numeral l8 See Figures in Figure 4 refers to the same device as 53 in- Figure 6showerheads. These may be made unscrewable from the water supply pipe, which can then be used directly as a spout. Numeral 22 in Figure 4 refers to the same facility as numeral 61 in Figure 6, namely safety overflows which can be adjusted in size and numbers to allow the contents to rise to a limited height and to prevent overflow into the room. A similar incorporated device is shown by the numerals I9, 28 and 2|, which permit discharge of contents through the drain pipes i9a, 29a and Zia, all of which can be controlled by the single handle l9b operating the Valve at 23, Figure 4 and Figure 5, a plurality of completely controlled outlets which make possible very rapid discharge of contents.

Another important feature of this device is that despite its greater capacity, it can be accommodated in any of the present size bathrooms. One of the common size bathrooms is 5' x 5'. The length of this tub may be 5' and the width 2 which will fit into such a bathroom as indicated in Figure 5 between the building wall 33 and the opposite bathroom wall 3l-a total wall-to-wall distance of 5.

The usual inside height of such a bathroom is 9'. The preferred model of the herein indicated bathing tank extends about 18" above the room floor, and protrudes about 24" below the ceiling of the bathroom underneath, allowing '12" for floor thickness. This leaves a space of about 5 from the top rim of the tank to the bottom of the tank protruding from the overhead bathroom-just enough space to conform to the ideas of comfort and beauty as advocated by the modern architect. The numeral 34 in Figure indicates a door in front of the threshold opening I6a, which can be arrangedto complement each other for perfect closure.

My device with its unique features disclosed and suggested lends itself adequately to modern purposes, afiording a variety of new benefits. Numeral 96 in Figure 5 indicates a therapeutic lamp like the infra-red or violet red lamp--' which is just another suggestion of the fitness of this device for more scientific living. Perhaps the largest number of people are not swimmers. They go into alake or a stream merely for immersion. One of the invigorating effects of such immersion comes from the uniformity of temperature in the water around the body. Frequent lack of uniformity of water temperature under a shower is one of its irritating influences. One of the objections to bathing in a much frequented city lake or stream is the impurity of water.

It becomes apparent from the claims and description herein presented that my bathing tank, among other purposes, affords the facility of, in addition to bathing in constantly changing or percolating water, the advantage of keeping the entire body of the bather uniformly immersed in water, of changing for the entire body the temperature of the water gradually from one extreme to the other, or, by means like sprays for instance, applying alternately hot and cold water to the body.

These advantages of my bathing tank, a facility more like the lake or stream than a bathtub or showerbath can ever be, and in some respects even better than the lake, are available summer and winter where lakes or bathing streams are ac cessible only during a limited part of the year for most communities.

My invention herein is susceptible to various changes and expansion. The details shown are for purposes of disclosure and not as limitations. The right is herein reserved to make such changes as properly fall within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A bathing tank, adapted to rest through a room floor, having continuous walls sufilciently high vertically to extend a substantial distance to a plane below and a substantial distance to a plane above the room floor, the part of the walls below the room floor embracing a floor, the complete tank without ceiling sufliciently deep internally to form a shower stall, the part of the walls above the room floor terminating in a substantially horizontal edge constituting the rim of said bathing tank.

2. A bathing tank adapted to rest through a room floor having continuous walls sufficiently high vertically to extend a substantial distance to a plane below and a substantial distance to a plane above the room floor, the part of the walls below the room floor embracing a floor, the part of the walls above the room floor terminating in a continuous rim, at least one showerhead near the top rim, the complete tank, without a ceiling, sufficiently deep internally to form a. showerstall.

3. A bathing tank substantially rectangular in cross-section at all levels, adapted to rest through a room floor, said bathing tank having four walls in continuous formation sufficiently high vertically to extenda substantial distance to a plane below and a substantial distance to a plane above the room floor, the part of the combined walls below the room floor embracing substantially a rectangular floor, the part of the combined walls above the room floor terminating correspondingly in a-continuous rectangular bathtub rim' at bathtub height from the room floor, at least one showerhead near the top rim,'the complete tank, without ceiling, sufliciently deep internally to form a showerstall, the external part of the bathing tank above the room floor being'shaped, in size, and in effect like a conventional bathtub.

4. A showerstall-bathtub-bathing tank sub stantially rectangular in cross section at all levels, adap-tedto rest through a room floor, said tank having four walls in continuous formation sufficiently'high vertically to extend a substantial distance to a plane below and a substantial distance to a plane above the roomfloor, the part of the combined walls below the room floor embracing substantially a rectangular floor, the part of the combined walls above the room floor terminating in a continuous rectangular bathtub rim at bathtub height from the room floor, the four upright walls of the tank in size and in effeet a conventional bathtub above the room floor, recessed internally at bathtub height from the bottom, the chamber part extended downward from the thusly formed ledge internally shaped like a conventional bathtub, the ledge effecting its rim, the walls embracing the thusly inbuilt bathtub and rising through the ledge to the rim at the top constituting a showerstall, provided with openings for plumbing connections, including an opening in the floor for a drain and at least one sho-werhead near the rim at the top, said floor embraced as the tank floor constituting the receptor for the said showerstall,-the walls thereof having embodied recesses in step'formation as foot rests from a plane above the receptor to a plane below the top rim of the said showerstall-bathtub-bathing tank.

5. A rectangular showerstall-bathtub-bathing tank comprising longitudinally two long rectangular and longitudinally two short rectangular walls, in chamber formation, embracing a correspondingly elongated floor constituting the bottom of said tank, said tank adapted to be suspended partially above and partially below and through an opening in a room floor, the part of said tank above the floor effecting the external walls of a conventional bathtub, the showerstalh bathtub-bathing tank unit provided with openings for plumbing connections, at least one showerhead near the continuous rim at the top, the walls between the top rim and the bottom floor having embodied recesses conveniently disposed in step formation as footrests and spanned by rods constituting accessible safety handholds embodied in the walls of the unit.

6. A bathing tank substantially rectangular in cross section at all levels adapted to hang through a room floor, said bathing tank having four walls in continuous formation sufiiciently high vertically to extend a substantial distance to a plane below and a substantial distance to a plane above the room floor, the part of the walls below the room floor embracing substantially a rectangular floor, the partof the walls above the room floor in shape and size and externally in eifect a conventional bathtub, the complete tank provided with a plurality of showerheads at least one of them being near the top rim, vsufiiciently deep internally as a full height showerstall, one

a series of treads on the interior in stair formation from the top to the bottom of the tank, said treads provided with openings for drains, the bottom tread indented to embrace a bathtub bathers headrest incline.

7. A bathing tank having on its exterior means for its suspension through an opening in a room floor, and internally its walls niched in different parts, said niches conveniently disposed and spanned by bars as handholds, the niches as well as the handholds being integral parts of said bathing tank.

8. A bathing tank adapted to rest through a building floor having continuous walls sufiiciently high vertically to extend a substantial distance to a plane below and a substantial distance at all points generally to the same horizontal rim above the room floor, plumbing facilities including drains at several levels and at least one showerhead near the top rim, the part of said tank walls below the room floor embracing a floor, the complete bathing-tank between the top rim and the embraced floor sufficiently deep internally to form a showerstall fitted into a cradle attached to nearby supports.

9. A bathing tank as described having elements on part of its exterior as means of attachment to adjacent supports and on part of its exterior anchorage elements in size and shape adequate to formthe bathroom floor extending from the said bathing tank.

10. A bathing tank as described having anchorage elements on part of its exterior shaped and formed to cover the bathroom floor extending from the said bathing tank and on part of its exterior anchorage elements rising to and terminating in a window frame to fit into a corresponding opening of a building wall.

11. A rectangular showerstall-bathtub-bathing tank comprising longitudinally two short rectangular and longitudinally two longer rectangular walls, in chamber formation, embracing correspondingly a floor constituting the bottom of said tank, said tank adapted to be suspended through an opening in a room floor to the extent of a conventional bathtub above and substantially the same distance below said room floor, the part of said tank above the room floor eiiecting the external walls of a conventional bathtub, said showerstall-bathtub-bathing tank, provided with plumbing facilities including at difierent levels openings for drains and near the top rim at least one showerhead, the floor embraced as the tank floor constituting the receptor for the subtending full height showerstall, the walls thereof having embodied recesses as footrests from a plane above the bottom to a plane below the top rim of the said showerstall-bathtub-bathing tank, the complete vessel fitted into a cradle attached to nearby supports.

12. A bathing tank substantially rectangular in cross section at all levels, adapted to rest through a'room fioor, said tank having four walls in continuous formation sufficiently high vertically to extend to a plane below and a substantial distance to a plane above the room floor, the part of the combined walls below the room floor embracing substantially a rectangular floor, the part of the combined walls above the room floor terminating in a continuous substantially rectangular bathtub rim at bathtub height from the room fioor, the complete tank, without ceiling, suificiently deep internally to form a showerstall, with the part of the tank above the room floor shaped, in size and in efiect a conventional bathtub, said showerstallbathtub-bathing tank provided with openings for plumbing connections, at least one showerhead near the rim at the top, one wall of said tank inset at different levels to form a series of treads on the interior in stair formation, at least one of said treads provided with an opening for a drain, the bottom tread and the riser under it indented and curved to form a bathtub bathers headrest incline, the walls of the vessel on the interior embodying U-shaped. handlebars as safety handholds.

13. A showerstall-bathtub-bathing tank, adapted to rest through a room floor, having continuous walls sufficiently high vertically to extend a substantial distance to a plane below and a substantial distance to a plane above the room floor, the part of the walls below the room floor embracing a floor, the part of the walls above the room floor terminating in a continuous rim, at least one showerhead near the top rim, the complete tank, without a ceiling, sufficiently deep internally to form a showerstall, the walls thereof having at difierent levels embodied recesses spanned integrally by bars conveniently shaped as footholds and handholds.

14. A bathing tank having on its exterior means for its suspension through an opening in a room floor, and internally one wall inset at different levels to form a series of treads on the interior in stair formation from the top to the bottom of the tank, said treads provided with openings for drains, the bottom tread indented to embrace a bathtub bathers headrest incline.

S. J. S. STANTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2417499 *Jun 28, 1944Mar 18, 1947Ille Floyd WTherapeutic bath
US3015110 *Jan 19, 1959Jan 2, 1962Pierre TreandPrefabricated bathroom unit
US3151341 *Aug 8, 1962Oct 6, 1964Royden H Wood JrRecessed shower tub
US3396412 *Jul 2, 1965Aug 13, 1968Lawrence R. FrancomBathtub
US4956882 *Jul 19, 1989Sep 18, 1990Cohn Harold S IiiBath tub liner
US5050252 *Aug 14, 1990Sep 24, 1991Gruber Systems, IncUniversal adjustable grab bar assembly
US5659904 *Aug 1, 1996Aug 26, 1997Brk Brands, Inc.Tub grab bar
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/546, 4/575.1, D23/275, 4/568, 4/589
Cooperative ClassificationA47K3/001