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Publication numberUS2058584 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 27, 1936
Filing dateApr 12, 1935
Priority dateApr 12, 1935
Publication numberUS 2058584 A, US 2058584A, US-A-2058584, US2058584 A, US2058584A
InventorsGastel Maria H
Original AssigneeGastel Maria H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Candle
US 2058584 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v Oct. 27, 1936. M. H. GASTEL. 2,058,584

CANDLE Filed April' 12, 1935 17272672607" Jfarz'a: 1% Gap'eZ Patented Oct. 27, 1936 'UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 12 Claim.

This invention relates to a candle or other object formed of inflammable material and designed to be burned. I

It has for one object to provide means for mak- 6 ing a device of an irregular shape and for so constructing it that it retains substantially the same shape during the major portion of its burning.

Another object is to provide an article formed of inflammable material and designed to be 10 burned and so arranged that certain parts of it are less readily meltable than others and hence will retain their shape longer than other parts.

Other objects will appear from time .to time in the specification and claims.

16 The invention is illustrated more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of the candle in a candle stick;

Figure 2 is a transverse, generally horizontal section, taken at line 2-2 of Figure 1 on an enlarged scale;

Figure 3 is a generally vertical section taken at llne 33 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a generally vertical section taken at line 4-4 of Figure 2 and showing the candle burning and partially burned;

Figure 5 is an elevation, showing a modified form of the invention.

Like parts are designated by likecharacters throughout the specification and drawing.

In the form here shown the invention comprises a candle. That term as used is intended broadly to cover any inflammable article, made 35 of inflammable material and designed to be burned and having a wick of any sort. While the article is here shown as being generally heart shaped, that is unimportant. Many other shapes may be used which will have the general me- 40 chanical characteristics embodied in the present form. Where the word candle is used, therefore, it is to be understood as not limiting the invention to the generally straight or elongated candle of commerce.

45 In the form shown, the article is composed generally of a body I of relatively inflammable material. The article as a whole is surrounded with a coating 2 of less easily melted material. Thus the body or core I melts at an appreciably lower 5 temperature than the covering or jacket 2.

The candle is larger adjacent its top than at its bottom. Thus it is formed as shown particularly in Figure 2 of two relatively curved portions 3, 3, which are positioned farther away from the 5 wick 4 than the intermediate portions 5, 5, and

, as shown it is notched across its top as at 6.

When the wick is ignited the portion of the candle closest to it melts and burns first. A considerable area of the central portion becomes liquefied under the influence of heat, as shown at I in 5 Figure 4, while the remainder of the candle,

namely, the coating or jacket 2, remains much less melted and so provides a cup for the melted portion of the more readily meltable material. This not merely provides a cup but causes the candle as a whole to retain its shape because as the softer interior melts and burns, the harder exterior always melts more slowly and the flame persists in the body of the candle while the shell in a large part retains its form.

The candle being initially notched as at 6 and narrower as at 5, the portion of the shell at 5 is closer to the flame than the portion surrounding the bulges 3, and thus as burning continues the portions of the shell at 5 melt ahead of the por- 2O tions on the outer sides of the bulges 3 and thus the notch 6 persists during almost the entire burning life of the candle so that the candle retains its shape through almost its entire period of use. This is accomplished partly by the shape of the 5 candle and partly by the materials chosen.

To some degree a candle shaped as shown will. retain its shape during burning even if the outer shell melts as readily as the inner, but it has been found in practice that by malung the outer shell less readily meltable than the interior of the candle the article produced is superior, and will retain its shape very much longer because it does not melt off flat at the top and lose the curving contour of the outline given.

In the form shown in the first four figures, the candle is provided with a generally rounded base 8, which fits it for use in a standard candle stick'9.

In the form shown in Figure fi, which is particularly adaptable to small candles, instead of the 40 rounded base 8, there is a pin H]. Such candles are designed for use where they can be stuck directly into some material, such as a cake, or

for use in any other association where a candle stick is not suitable and where the candle is to be burned in something into which the pick or pin I0 can be driven.

It will be realized that whereas I have herewith shown and described a practical operative device, nevertheless many changes might be made in the size, shape, and disposition of the parts without departing from the spirit of my invention and I wish, therefore, that my showing be taken as in a sense diagrammatic.

I claim:

1. As a new article of manufacture, a candle formed of a main body of material of one degree of meltability and a coating material of a less degree of meltability, and a wick, the candle shaped to provide on the same general level zones of the coating relatively close to the wick and zones of the coating relatively farther away from the wick, and the candle body provided initially with a depression in its upper surface adjacent the wick and extending through the zones of coating material closest to the wick.

2. As a new article of manufacture, an irregularly shaped candle of non-circular cross section, larger at its top than at its bottom, provided with a wick and formed of a main body of material of a given degree of meltability and provided with a coating of a less degree of meltability, the candle formed at its lower end with a portion of generally rounded cross section.

3. As a new article of manufacture, a candle of generally flattened shape formed of a main body of material of one degree of meltability and a coating of material of a less degree of meltability, and a wick, the candle shaped to provide zones of the coating relatively close to the wick and zones of the coating relatively farther away from the wick, the candle formed at its lower end with a portion of generally rounded cross section.

4. As anew article of manufacture, a candle formed of a main body of material of one degree of meltability and a coating of materialof a less degree of meltability, and a wick, the candle shaped to provide zones of the coating relatively close to the wick and zones of the coating relatively farther away from the wick, and the candle body provided initially with a depression in its upper surface adjacent the wick and extending through the zones of coating material closest to the wick, the candle formed at its lower end with a portion of generally rounded cross section.

5. As a new article of manufacture, an irregularly shaped candle, larger at its top than at its bottom, provided with a wick and formed of a main body of material of a given degree of meltability and provided with a coating of a less degree of meltability, and a pin-like member projecting from the bottom of the candle for insertion into a support.

6. As a new article of manufacture, a candle formed of a main body of material of one degree of meltability and a coating of material of a less degree of meltability, and a wick, the candle shaped to provide zones of the coating relatively close to the wick and zones of the coating reintively farther away from the wick, and a pinlike member projecting from the bottom of the candle for insertion into a support.

7. As a new article of manufacture, a candle projecting from the bottom of the candle for insertion into a support.

8. As a new article of manufacture, a candle, provided with a wick and formed of a main body of material of a given degree of meltability, and provided with a coating of a less degree of meltability, the candle being provided with generally up and down indentations on its exterior, and with a depression in its top, the up and down indentations placed opposite each other and joining the top depression.

9. As a new article of manufacture, a candle,

provided with a wick and formed of a main body of material of a given degree of meltability, and provided with a coating of a less degree of meltability, the candle being provided with generally up and down indentations on its exterior, and with a depression in its top, and the up and down indentations placed opposite each other and joining the top depression, the wick positioned at the point of juncture.

10. As a new article of manufacture, a candle, provided with a wick and formed of a main body of material, the candle being provided with generally up and down indentations on its exterior, and with a depression in its top, and the up and down indentations placed opposite each other and joining the top depression, the wick positioned at the point of juncture.

11. As a new article of manufacture, a candle I having a wick and a generally flattened main body portion, and a reduced base portion below said flattened portion, said candle being formed as a whole of a material of a given degree of meltability and provided with a coating of a less degree of meltability.

12. As a new article of manufacture, a candle having a wick and a generally flattened main body portion, and a reduced base portion below said flattened portion, an indentation in the upper surface of said candle, extending across said candle body through approximately its narrowest portion, said wick positioned within said indentation, said candle being formed as a whole of a material of a given degree of meltability and provided with a coating of a less degree of meltability.

MARIA H. GASTEL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2502592 *Apr 30, 1942Apr 4, 1950Rieke Sidney CMethod of producing and using fruit and vegetable coating wax
US2503920 *Jan 30, 1947Apr 11, 1950Rieke Sidney CMethod of coating fruits and vegetables
US2584563 *Nov 8, 1949Feb 5, 1952Duncan Dwight WDisplay candle
US2735285 *Apr 27, 1955Feb 21, 1956 Ferleger
US2959950 *May 10, 1957Nov 15, 1960Walter WeglinDripping candle
US3434789 *Jun 8, 1967Mar 25, 1969James Gilbert HallerAesthetic illuminating device
US3886252 *Sep 7, 1973May 27, 1975Pioneer Arts & Crafts IncMethod of making a wax candle replica
US5338187 *Sep 24, 1993Aug 16, 1994Shimon ElhararCandle and method of making same
US5927959 *May 24, 1997Jul 27, 1999Johnson; Jac NolanReplica flame
US6161949 *Jul 26, 1999Dec 19, 2000Johnson; Jac NolanReplica flame
US6439880 *Feb 11, 2000Aug 27, 2002Robert RayClear candle construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/296, 431/125, 431/288, 431/126, D26/7
International ClassificationC11C5/00
Cooperative ClassificationC11C5/008
European ClassificationC11C5/00F