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Publication numberUS2058915 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 27, 1936
Filing dateFeb 8, 1935
Priority dateFeb 8, 1935
Publication numberUS 2058915 A, US 2058915A, US-A-2058915, US2058915 A, US2058915A
InventorsScholl Albert A
Original AssigneeChase Nat Bank Of The City Of
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drip protector for bottles
US 2058915 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 27, 1936.

' DRIP PROTECTOR FOR BOTTLES A. A. SCHOLL- 2,058,915

Filed Feb. 8, 1935 INVENTOR. 41.66? ,4. J'C/WZZ ATTORNEY.

Patented Oct. 27, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFIQE mesne assignments, to The Chase National Bank of the City of New York, New York, N. Y.,

trustee Application February 8, 1935, Serial No. 5,589

5 Claims.

My invention has a primary objective to provide a cheap form of protector to be applied to bottles to absorb any moisture collected on its surface and to prevent water from dripping from the bottles, thereby to protect the clothes and hands of the user.

It is a further object of my invention to devise such a protector which may be very cheaply manufactured from a minimum of material.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a form for such protector which will most nearly conform to'the shape of the bottles fitting therein.

It is a further object of my invention to provide such a protector formed from two different materials, one of such materials performing the primary function of absorption and the other of such materials contributing enormously to ease in manufacture and/ or to the sales and advertising appeal of the protector as a whole.

Referring to the drawing wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a bottle protector made in accordance with my invention;

Fig. 2 is a modification of the form shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a further form of the invention;

Fig. 4 shows details applicable to the several forms;

Fig. 5 illustrates the form of the invention shown in Fig. 1 as it would be formed on certain types of machines;

Fig. 6 is a variation of the device;

Fig. '7 corresponding to Fig. 3, shows the bottle protector formed of two different materials;

Fig. 8 corresponding to Fig. 2, shows the device as formed from two different materials; and

Fig. 9 shows one of my bottle protectors applied to a bottle.

The bottle protectors forming my present invention are designed to be manufactured on the type of machine wherein a strip of paper or similar material is formed into a tube and separated into separate articles. The provision of die cuts, and the forming of a tube and tubular articles, may be accomplished by well known means.

A primary object of my invention is to so form the bottle protectors that they may be easily and quickly opened and slipped over a bottle. The provision of a projecting flap or flaps is accomplished by suitable mechanism, which flaps not only facilitate the opening of the devices, but facilitate the folding of a portion of the protector over the bottom of a bottle inserted therein.

In Fig. 1 there is illustrated a bottle protector comprising a tube having a front wall I!) and a rear wall H, the tube being formed by adhesively uniting the edges of a strip of paper at l2. The rear wall It is considerably longer than the front wall, being provided with projecting flaps l3 and M, the corresponding material of the front wall having been removed by dies or otherwise. The edges l5 and it of the front and back walls, respectively, extend straight across the protector, thereby facilitating the formation of a series of protectors of the same size and shape. In the use of this form of the device, either end flap I3 or It. may be grasped and the protector shaken open and slipped over a bottle. Either end flap 1 may then be folded across the bottom of the bottle. The articles perform the functions of absorbing the moisture adhering to the surface of a wet bottle and preventing drops from falling therefrom. The wet bottom of the bottle will tend to hold the end flap in place after it has been positioned by a simple wiping motion, either with the palm of the hand or by sliding the bottle across the surface of a table.

In Fig. 2 the same form of bottle protector is illustrated, there being, however, but one end flap l3 provided. This form entails less waste in the manufacture thereof and embodies the advantages of the first form. In use, the flap l3 will be folded over the bottom of the bottle.

In Fig. 3 an ordinary tube has been formed, as previously described, by adhesively uniting the edges of a sheet of paper at 2B, the so formed tube being separated into blanks along straight lines 2| and 22 providing ends of both front and back walls lying in the same plane. Preferably, in this form of the invention, the line of adhesive 20 extends only a major portion of the length of the article, leaving edges of the sheet unattached at one end. In using this form of the device, an unattached edge of the sheet may be grasped to assist in opening the tubular blank. To assist in identifying the unattached end, there is preferably provided an indicium 23 adjacent the extremity of the adhesive line, this indicium being a printed line or other mark also serving to indicate the point at which the end is to be folded over the bottom of the bottle. Since the portion of the article to be folded is not joined at its edges, the folding thereof will be more easily ac- 50 complished than if the adhesive extended throughout the length of the protector.

In Fig. 4 an aid to the opening of the form of Fig. 3 is shown in the provision of die cut thumb notches 24 in one wall, at at least one end of the 55 airticle. Thumb notches may be applied wherever the ends of the walls lie in a single plane.

In Fig. 5 the form of the invention illustrated in Fig. 1 is shown as it would be formed in the type of machine wherein tucks are formed in the walls of the tube during the course of its manufacture. The tucks provide gussets 3B. These gussets allow the formation of a narrower article to fit the same size of bottle for which the form of Fig. 1 is designed. The gussets aid in the opening of the article from its fiat condition into a rounded tube, which may be slipped over a bottle. It is preferred that the flaps I 3 and 54 extend only the width of the back wall and not into the gussets 30, although it will be readily apparent that the flaps could extend to the front Wall l0. Fig. 5 is by way of illustrating the device, and any of the other forms herein illustrated may be provided with similar gussets without departing from my invention.

Fig. 6 shows a form wherein a straight-cut tubular protector, having a front wall l8 and a back wall I I, provided with a seam l2 and straight ends 2| and 22, is provided with a plurality of longitudinal cuts 40 extending inwardly from the edge 22 for a minor proportion of the length of the article. The cuts 40 extend around the blank and may be formed by the die which strikes the article from the continuous tube. The plurality of flaps 4| so formed, are not only easier to fold against the bottom of a bottle, but provide greater protection against dripping and moisture, inasmuch as there are a greater number of free edges absorbing moisture into the fibres of the paper. Fig. 6 is meant to be, by way of illustration, a detail of form which may be incorporated into any of the other illustrated forms.

In Fig. 7 there is illustrated a form of my invention in which the article is manufactured from a plurality of webs in any manner well known in the art. Preferably, the wider web 53 comprises a soft, stretchable and highly absorbent material, such as towel, napkin, or tissue paper. The narrower web 5| is joined thereto by two lines of adhesive 20 preferably extending only a major proportion of the length of the article and terminating at or near an indicating mark 23. The web 5| may be some transparent material through which the label of the bottle or the color of its contents may be observed, thereby preventing mistakes in sales. The stronger web enables the formation and drawing of a tube, which would be difficult to perform if the entire article were made of soft, stretchable and absorbent tissue. Either web, of course, may be printed with advertising matter, and the web 5! may be a strong, printable, paper web. In this form it does not matter whether the web 5| is absorbent to any great extent, inasmuch as the greater portion of the article is highly absorbent and there will be enough folded around the bottom of the bottle to prevent water from dripping around the edges of the web 5|.

In Fig. 8 the form of the device illustrated in Fig. 2 is manufactured from a plurality of webs comprising an absorbent web 50, and a strong, narrower web 5|, the absorbent web being provided with a projecting end flap I3 which may be folded over the end of a bottle.

In Fig. 9 there is illustrated a bottle A, about which a bottle protector has been placed, illustrating the functioning thereof to protect the hands and clothes of a person from water collected on the surface of the bottle. The ease with which an end flap may be positioned, and the close conformity of the protector to the bottle is readily apparent.

Other modifications and combinations of the details herein disclosed will be apparent and I do not intend to be limited except by the scope of the following claims, which are to be broadly construed.

I claim:

1. Means for preventing drip from bottles comprising a paper tube having front and rear walls, said walls at each end terminating in straight lines lying in the same plane, and a series of longitudinal slits spaced across one end of said tube and extending longitudinally thereof.

2. Means for preventing drip from bottles comprising a flexible tube open at each end, said tube being formed of longitudinal strips of materials united at their edges, one of said strips forming the major portion of the tube and being composed of relatively weak and highly absorbent material, the other of said strips forming the remainder of the tube being composed of relatively strong and substantially transparent material.

3. Means for preventing drip from bottles comprising a flexible tube open at each end, said tube being formed of longitudinal strips of materials united at their edges, one of said strips being wider than the other and being composed of relatively weak and highly absorbent material, the remaining portion of said tube formed by the narrower strip being composed of relatively strong and substantially transparent material, the strip composed of absorbent material having a flap projecting beyond the end of the other strip, said flap being of sufficient length to cover the bottom of a bottle inserted in the tube with its bottom adjacent the said end of the narrower strip.

4. Means for preventing drip from bottles comprising a tube formed by uniting the longitudinal edges of two strips of flexible materials, said tube being open at each end and having a flap extending from at least one end, said flap facilitating opening of the tube to permit entrance of a bottle therein and being of sufficient length to cover the bottom of the bottle when inserted, said flap being formed upon one of said strips of materials, the material forming said strip being relatively absorbent.

5. Means for preventing drip from bottles comprising a tube formed by uniting the longitudinal edges of two strips of flexible materials, said tube being open at each end and having a flap extend ing from at least one end, said flap facilitating opening of the tube to permit entrance of a bottle therein and being of sufficient length to cover the bottom of the bottle when inserted, said flap being formed upon one of said strips of materials, the material forming said strip being relatively absorbent, the material forming the other of said strips being relatively transparent.

ALBERT A. SCHOLL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2608074 *Dec 16, 1949Aug 26, 1952Davis Edgar BAbsorbent coaster
US3047205 *Nov 20, 1959Jul 31, 1962Southard Hubert HBag closure
US3128895 *Jan 24, 1961Apr 14, 1964 Protective wrappers for breakable articles
US4399668 *Sep 17, 1981Aug 23, 1983Williamson Alma JIndividual beverage cooler
US4960225 *Sep 7, 1989Oct 2, 1990Rolando GillisCover structure for beverage cans or like containers
US6026983 *Sep 2, 1998Feb 22, 2000Gregory W. GrahamCombination beverage sleeve and coaster
US20110290822 *May 26, 2011Dec 1, 2011Gustav BouwerDrip guard
WO2003061440A1 *Jan 20, 2003Jul 31, 2003Burton Charles NicholasSleeve for thermal insulation and liquid absorption
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/395, 215/394, 383/106
International ClassificationB65D23/06, B65D23/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D23/065
European ClassificationB65D23/06B