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Publication numberUS2059292 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 3, 1936
Filing dateApr 13, 1933
Priority dateApr 13, 1933
Publication numberUS 2059292 A, US 2059292A, US-A-2059292, US2059292 A, US2059292A
InventorsTaylor William T
Original AssigneeGeorge D Ellis And Sons Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Art of working sheet metal
US 2059292 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- NOV. 3, 1936 W, T TAYLOR `2,059,292

RT oF wo Filed April 13, 1953 f L1; Il... @www Patented Nov. 3, 1.936

UNITED STATES A'lET OFFIE f ART OF WORKING SHEET METAL Application April 13, 1933, Serial No. 665,887

Claims.

This invention relates to the art of working sheet metal and has to do particularly with a process whereby a sheet of metal which has thereon an embossed name or other design may be pro- 5 vided with corrugations or similar indentations or strengthening ribs without effacing the embossing to any substantial extent. As described herein, the improvement is particularly adapted for use in the manufacture of sheet metal containers such as are ordinarily employed With delivery trucks in handling gasoline, oil and similar products, although it is equally adapted for use in the manufacture of other sheet metal articles.

In containers of the character referred to, it is desirable to have the name of the owner afxed thereto in such a manner that it is clearly visible and may not be readily removed. It is also customary and desirable to provide the side Wall of such containers with corrugations for the purpose of strengthening the container and for preventing it from being easily deformed when subjected to rough usage. Various means have heretofore been employed in aiiixing the name of the owner to the container, such as by riveting or soldering a name plate to a suitable portion thereof, or by indenting or embossing the name in a smooth surface of a portion of the Wall of the container.

The preferable practice heretofore employed in afxing the name of the owner to the container has been to emboss the name on a smooth portion of the vertical wall, the remaining portions of the vertical Wall being provided with strengthening corrugations. Such a construction, however, has been objectionable to the bureaus of Weights and measures of many States and municipalities for the reason that it necessitates a broken, irregular, inner surface which impedes the proper flow of the contents of the container and results in the dispensing of inaccurate quantities of oil or other liquids for which the container is used.

In order to avoid the objections inherent in containers in which the name of the owner has been embossed in a portion of the side Wall which is free from the strengthening corrugations, it also has been the rpractice heretofore to utilize a double vertical Wall, the inner one of which is smooth throughout its extent so as not to impede the flow of the contents of the container, and the outer of which is provided With the necessary strengthening corrugations and such embossed names or other designs as may be desired. As will be apparent, however, the manufacture of this doublejacketed type of container is more expensive than a container which has only a single vertical Wall,

and it is one of the purposes of the present improvement to avoid the necessity of utilizing the double wall structure heretofore employed.

Various methods have heretofore been attempted for corrugating an embossed sheet of metal Without interrupting the corrugations over that portion of the surface occupied by the ernbossing. If the embossing is applied.' to the metal sheet, and the sheet is then passed through the usual corrugating rolls, the embossing is practicallyeiaced or ironed out by the action of the ccrrugating rolls, and the name or other design becomes so unsightly as to be unsuited for the purposes for which it was intended. If the sheet of metal is first corrugated and the name or other design is then embossed thereon by the usual embossing dies, both the corrugations and the embossing are unsightly and not well adapted for use.

It has also been proposed to corrugate the sheet of metal and emboss the name or other design thereon by the same operation. However, such a method necessitates the use of individual dies for each name or other design embossed on the sheet, and inasmuch as the production of a combined corrugating and embossing die involves an unusual expense, such a method of corrugating andV embossing is objectionable from that standpoint, as will be readily appreciated. It has also been proposed to iirst corrugate the sheet of metal and then emboss the name or other esign thereon by means of a corrugated embossing die having a contour designed to interfit with the corrugations previously applied to the sheet of metal. The manufacture of such an embossing die also entails an unusual expense, and this eX- pense is prohibitive of the use of such a die for ordinary commercial purposes.

In an endeavor to overcome the objections which are inherent in the various methods heretofore proposed, I have found that suitable corrugations or other strengthening indentations may be applied to a previously embossed sheet of metal and superimposed over the embossing without 4destroying or effacing the embossed design. In general, this is accomplished by supporting the embossed sheet at intervals on one side thereof and applying pressure to' the opposite side of the sheet substantially midway between the supported portions so that the corrugating ribs are produced by stretching the material of the sheet in each of the corrugations. By supporting the sheet at spaced intervals and applying pressure substantially along a line midway of the unsupported portions, I avoid ironing out or effacing the embossed design to any substantial extent.

It is one of the objects of the present invention, therefore, to corrugate or strengthen an embossed sheet of metal without eiacing the einbossing previously applied thereto. It is a further object of the invention to provide a method of embossing and corrugating a Sheet of metal wherein the embossing and corrugating or other strengthening means may be applied without the necessity of discontinuing the corrugations over the embossed portion of the sheet. A further object of the invention is the provision of a process whereby strengthening corrugations may be superimposed upon an embossed design without effacing the design. It is a still further object of the invention to provide a method of corrugating a blank of sheet metal without decreasing the linear dimensions of the blank. A still further object of the invention is the provision of protective means for embossing on a sheet of metal.

In order that the invention may be clearly understood reference may be made to the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Fig. 1 shows a plan view of a portion of a sheet metal blank having a name embossed thereon;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional View through the embossed blank shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an elevational view showing portions of the corrugating rolls;

Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional View through the corrugating rolls shown in Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a View similar to Fig. 1, with the corrugations applied to the embossed sheet;

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal sectional View through the corrugated, embossed sheet shown in Fig. 5;

Fig. '7 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view showing the details of the structure of the corrugating rolls, with a sheet of metal therebetween;

Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 7 showing a modied form of the lower corrugating roll or supporting roll;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view through the embossing on the blank shown in Fig. 5;

Fig. 10 is an elevational view, partly in section, showing a container made in accordance with the improvement; and

Fig. 11 is a transverse sectional view through the container shown in Fig. 10.

In the practice of the improved process to which the invention relates, a sheet metal blank I is provided on a face 2 thereof with an embossed name or other design 3, preferably by impressing the same in the opposite face 4 of the blank, as indicated at 5, by means of embossing dies in any well-known manner. This blank, with the desired name or design embossed thereon, is then passed between a pair of corrugating rolls in order that it may be provided with suitable corrugations designed for strengthening and protective purposes. The lower or supporting roll 6 is provided with a series of annular supporting ribs 'I spaced from each other at such a distance as to determine the width of the corrugations to be applied to the blank. Preferably, the supporting ribs 'I are provided with a flat supporting surface 8 and tapering side walls 9, which, taken with the bottom wall I0, provide a series of spaced, annular channels II on the supporting roll.

The upper or pressure roll I2 is provided with a series of corrugating ribs I3 spaced from each other at such a distance as to engage between the supporting ribs 'I on the lower roll 6. The edges of the corrugating ribs are preferably slightly rounded, as shown at I6, and the ribs have tapering walls I5 diverging from the rounded edges I4 at an angle slightly in excess of the angle between the tapering walls 9 of the annular channels II in the supporting roll 6. The tapering walls I5 of adjacent corrugating ribs i3 merge into a substantially hat wall I6 forming the bottom of annular channels Il extending about the pressure roll I2 between adjacent corrugating ribs. Preferably, as shown in Fig. 4, the supporting ribs 'I on the lower roll E extend entirely around the roll, while the corrugating ribs I3 on the upper roll I2 extend only partially thereabout. The extent of the corrugating ribs I3 about roll I2 will be such, however, as to provide corrugations of such length as may be desired in the sheet metal blank worked upon. It will be understood that the supporting ribs 'I may extend only partially around the roll 6 and have a length substantially equal to or slightly greater than the ribs I3.

In Fig. 4 I have disclosed an embossed blank, such as that shown in Fig. 1, entering between the corrugating roll I2 and the supporting roll 6, and supported at I3 upon the faces 8 of the ribs l. Inasmuch as the corrugating ribs I3 extend only partially around the corrugating roll, the edge I9 of the blank which rst enters between the rolls will not be corrugated, but will remain smooth, as clearly shown in Fig. 5. When the rolls rotate to such an extent as to bring the lower ends 2U of the corrugating ribs I3 into contact with the blank, the portions of the blank between the supporting ribs 'I of the lower roll are progressively forced downwardly into the channels II between the supporting ribs to form strengthening corrugations ZI. Inasmuch as the blank is supported only upon the upper faces 8 of the supporting ribs TI, and pressure is progressively applied substantially midway of the unsupported portions 22 by the rounded edges I4 of the corrugating ribs I3, the material of the unsupported portions 22 of the blank is progressively forced into the channels II between the supporting ribs of the lower roll. By reason of the fact that the blank is supported only at transverse intervals and pressure is applied along lines substantially midway of the unsupported portions of the blank, and by reason of the angular relation of the sloping walls of the corrugating ribs and the supporting ribs, the unsupported portions 22 contact with the rolls only at the edges I4 of the ribs I3, and the embossing is not eifaced to any substantial extent, as occurs in the use of ordinary corrugating rolls where pressure is applied throughout the extent of the inclined walls of the corrugations.

It will be understood that the size of the rolls Ii and I2 and the length of the corrugating ribs I3 on the upper roll I2 will be such that the corrugations in the blank may terminate at a considerable distance from the edge of the blank, thus leaving a smooth portion 23, as shown in Fig. 5. It will also be understood that the width of the blank measured in the direction of the length of the corrugations, as well as the length thereof, will be such as may be desired for the purpose intended. In the case of the particular container 24 illustrated in Fig. 10, the width of the blank I is substantially equal to the height of the vertical side wall of the container, and the length of the blank I is substantially equal to the circumference of the container. In the practice of the improved process disclosed herein, it will be noted that there is no decrease in the overall dimensions of the sheet metal blank I by the application of the corrugations thereto. This is due to the fact that the corrugations themselves are formed by stretching the material of the blank in opposite directions in adjacent Walls of the corrugations, the portions of the blank supported upon the faces 8 of the ribs 'I remaining free from lateral movement thereon. By reason of this, it is unnecessary to provide any surplus length in the blank from which the vertical wall of the container is made.

After the blank has been embossed and provided With corrugations in the manner hereinbefore described, the ends are bent into overlapping relation and Welded or soldered together, as shown at 25 in Fig. 1l, to thus form the vertical Wall of the container. The bottom 26, the tapering top 21, and the neck 28 are then secured thereon in any suitable manner, but inasmuch as the structure of the container in its entirety forms no part of the present invention a detailed description thereof is omitted.

In the form of supporting roll shown in Fig. 8, the channels II are formed with curved Walls I' extending between adjacent supporting surfaces 8. As will be apparent, the precise shape of these channels is immaterial and they may be of any suitable form so long as the Walls are spaced from the corrugating ribs I3 suniciently to prevent the corrugations 2I formed in the sheet from being forced into contact therewith by the corrugating ribs I3 on the upper roll I2.

While my improved process of embossing and corrugating is illustrated herein in connection with a sheet metal container, it will be understood that the improvement is equally applicable to sheet metal blanks of other types and for other purposes. It will also be understood that the improvement is not to be limited to the precise manner disclosed herein for providing corrugations or other strengthening or protecting means. For example, I have shown corrugating rolls as the means by which the corrugations are applied to the embossed blank. It will be understood, however, that the corrugations may be applied to a previously embossed blank by means of corrugating dies, and that such dies would be so formed as to stretch the material of the blank and form the corrugations without ironing out or efacing the embossing. Irrespective of the particular means employed in applying the corrugations or other strengthening means to the blank, my improvement involves the method wherein the blank, previously embossed, is supported at intervals over inconsequential areas of the blank, and the corrugations are formed by the application of pressure to the blank substantially along lines intermediate the supported portions. By producing the corrugations inthis manner, the embossed design is more or less uniformly stretched, and is not effaced or marred to any substantial extent. By my improved method the corrugations or strengthening means are thus superimposed upon the embossed design without any detrimental effects upon the design.

Having thus described my invention, what I desire to claim by United States Letters Patent 1. The method of afixing a name or other design to a sheet of metal, which consists in impressing said design in one side of said sheet to thereby emboss said design on the opposite side of said sheet, supporting said sheet on the embossed side thereof substantially along transversely spaced lines, and applying pressure to the impressed side of said sheet along lines substantially midway of the unsupported portions of the sheet to form corrugations in said sheet across said design without eifacing the design.

2. The method of aixing a name or other design to a sheet of metal, which consists in impressing said design in one side of said sheet to thereby emboss: said design in the opposite side of said sheet, supporting said sheet on one side along transversely spaced lines and applying pressure to the opposite side o f said sheet along lines substantially midway of the unsupported portions of the sheet to form corrugatio-ns in said sheet across said design and simultaneously stretch said design in the plane of said sheet Without eiacing the design.

3. The method of aixing a name or' other design to a sheet of metal, which consists in impressing said design in one side of said sheet to thereby emboss said design in the opposite side of said sheet, progressively supporting said sheet on one side along transversely spaced lines and progressively applying pressure to the opposite side of said sheet along lines substantially midway of the unsupported portions of the sheet to form corrugations in said sheet across said design Without eiacing the design.

4. The method of afxing a name or other design to a sheet of metal, Which consists in impressing said design in one side 4of said sheet to thereby emboss said design in the opposite side of the sheet, and forming corrugations in said sheet across said design and simultaneously stretching said design in the plane of the sheet Without eiacing the design.

5. The method of aixing a design to a sheet of metal, Which consists in impressing the desired design in one side of said sheet to thereby emboss said design in theopposite side of said sheet, and impressing a protective design in the first mentioned side of said sheet across the desired design and simultaneously stretching said design in the` plane of the sheet without effacing the design.

WILLIAM T. TAYLOR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2695329 *Apr 9, 1951Nov 23, 1954Lignes Telegraph TelephonElectrical conductor
US3053309 *Jul 21, 1958Sep 11, 1962S & S Corrugated Paper MachCorrugating flute contour
US3163925 *Sep 17, 1962Jan 5, 1965Universal Tool & Stamping CompMethod of forming a rigid steel rack bar for automobile jacks
US4857412 *Jan 14, 1987Aug 15, 1989Paul FleuryMethod for forming a planar sheet or plate to a curved shape
US5279442 *Dec 18, 1991Jan 18, 1994Ball CorporationDrawn and ironed container and apparatus and method for forming same
US5402592 *Jul 8, 1992Apr 4, 1995Panduit Corp.Embossed pipe marker
US5775060 *Jun 25, 1992Jul 7, 1998Soremartec S.A.Process for forming wrappers of thin sheet materials and a device for carrying out same
US6074507 *Jan 9, 1998Jun 13, 2000Corrugating Roll CorporationCorrugating roll with improved flute profile
US7578412 *Jul 23, 2004Aug 25, 2009Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcContainer having gripping recesses
US8020422 *Mar 7, 2008Sep 20, 2011Kabushiki Kaisha KunitecTubular product and manufacturing method and manufacturing device thereof
US8715835 *Feb 23, 2010May 6, 2014John Crane Uk LimitedTolerance strips
US20060027585 *Jul 23, 2004Feb 9, 2006Clamage Eric DContainer
US20080226935 *Mar 7, 2008Sep 18, 2008Kabushiki Kaisha KunitecTubular product and manufacturing method and manufacturing device thereof
US20110300399 *Feb 23, 2010Dec 8, 2011Christian KirchnerTolerance strips
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/379.6, 72/379.4, 72/196, 428/604, 40/616
International ClassificationB21D13/04, B21D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21D13/04
European ClassificationB21D13/04