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Publication numberUS2063014 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1936
Filing dateDec 22, 1932
Priority dateDec 22, 1932
Publication numberUS 2063014 A, US 2063014A, US-A-2063014, US2063014 A, US2063014A
InventorsAllen Raymond P
Original AssigneeAllen Raymond P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tobacco
US 2063014 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Dec. 8, 1936 PATENT OFFICE TOBACCO Raymond P. Allen, Akron, Ohio No Drawing. Application December 22, 1932, Serial No. 648,439

12 Claims.

This invention relates to a process of treating tobacco by which moisture or an aromatic substance such as menthol may be added to tobacco and be retained indefinitely until the tobacco is smoked. The process consists in homogeneously mixing with the tobacco, silica hydrogel or another strongly adsorbent material on which has been adsorbed the tobacco conditioning agent, such as moisture or menthol. Under ordinary conditions of temperature and pressure the adsorbent material, for example silica hydrogel, holds the adsorbed material tenaciously and will retain it indefinitely or until the tobacco is smoked. When the silica hydrogel is heated to the temperature of the burning tobacco, the adsorbed substance is volatilized and passes along with the smoke into the mouth of the smoker, thereby imparting the desired flavor or providing moisture which is responsible for additional flavor and smoothness. The process has the additional advantages that the adsorbent substance is tasteless and physiologically inert when heated.

It is a well recognized fact that the flavor of tobacco when smoked depends to a considerable extent on the amount of moisture present. Dry tobacco is harsh, flavorless, and irritating, while moist tobacco has a quality of smoothness, is relatively full of flavor and aroma, and is pleasant. The flavor of tobacco when smoked depends, also, to some extent on added substances, such as cassia oil, licorice, menthol, and so forth. It is recognized that the moisture which is present in tobacco and the flavors which are added are largely evanescent. For that reason in commercial practice, cigars, cigarettes, and pipe tobacco are packed after manufacture in wrappers which are more or less moisture-proof and more or less impermeable to vapors. Such means of retaining moisture and aromatic substances are, however, not satisfactory. The packages must be opened and are kept partially exposed to the air before the contents are used up. More important, under ordinary conditions of temperature, pressure and humidity, is the fact that the moisture and aromatic substance are slowly vaporized and lost through the more or less permeable packing.

On the other hand, with tobacco which has been treated by the process which I employ in this invention, moisture and aromatic substances will be effectively and indefinitely retained until the tobacco is smoked, even when the tobacco is stored under conditions of temperature, pressure and humidity which are distinctly unfavorable for the retention of moisture or volatile aromatic substances.

For example, cigarettes may be made from tobacco with which has been mixed 10 per cent. of silica hydrogel on which after activation has been adsorbed about 15 per cent. of water. If the cigarettes are stored in a dry atmosphere at a temperature of 35 to 4.5 C., for several months, it will be found at the end of that time that these cigarettes are mild, relative smooth and rela tively full of flavor and aroma, whereas cigarettes made from tobacco untreated by this process will be strong, harsh, and lacking in flavor.

It has been recognized that the addition of aromatic substances to tobacco imparts a pleasant flavor to the tobacco. In methods hitherto used the tobacco has been treated by soaking it in a suitable solution of the aromatic substance, or

the solution has been sprayed on the tobacco.

One disadvantage of such a process is that most aromatic substances which are suitable for this use have an appreciable vapor pressure at ordinary temperatures and for that reason the substance more or less rapidly vaporizes and escapes. In the process of my invention a wide variety of aromatic substances may be used and when adsorbed on a suitable adsorbent such as silica gel, exhibit a vapor pressure so extremely low at ordinary temperatures that the substances do not vaporize and escape.

For example, cigarette tobacco may be mixed. with 5 per cent. of silica gel, which after activation has been treated with an alcoholic solution of menthol, and may be made into cigarettes.

These cigarettes have a barely perceptible odor of menthol, which shows that practically none is being lost by volatilization, yet when smoked a distinct menthol flavor is experienced. The silica gel is so effective in retaining the menthol that practically none is lost even after months of storage. It is a striking fact that cigarettes so prepared retain the menthol flavor to the very end'as the cigarette is smoked, whereas with cigarettes in which the menthol has been incorporated by the ordinary spraying or soaking process, the menthol flavor is stronger during the first part of the smoke and continually decreases to the end.

This invention is not limited in application to the admixture of tobacco and a single adsorbent substance on which is adsorbed a single volatile material such as menthol. On the contrary, in carrying out the process of this invention a batch of tobacco may be mixed with one or more ad sorbent substances, on any one of which may be adsorbed both moisture and an aromatic substance or any desirable combination of volatile substances which will subsequently be vaporized when the tobacco is smoked; or two or more different volatile substances may be separately adsorbed on different adsorbents, which are then mixed with the tobacco.

The process of this invention may be carried out, also, by mixing activated silica gel or another suitable adsorbent with fresh raw tobacco which is ready to be made into cigars, cigarettes, or into pipe tobacco. The adsorbent material will thereupon adsorb moisture and flavor from the tobacco and retain this until the tobacco is smoked. This process is particularly desirable if the tobacco is to be shipped and used in a climate'which is especially humid, such as tropic or semi-tropical regions.

In the process of this invention, therefore, an adsorbent substance such as silica hydrogel may either be mixed in a dry condition with raw tobacco from which it then adsorbs moisture and aromatic substances or it may be allowed to adsorb moisture or an aromatic substance, or both, before it is mixed with the tobacco. The term adsorbent substance as used here in describing this invention therefore means a substance such as silica hydrogel which after being mixed with tobacco does contain an appreciable quantity of a volatile substance or of volatile substances which will be vaporized when the tobacco burns.

It has already been stated that among these volatile substances may be moisture, cassia oil, menthol, licorice or other substances which will be vaporized and result in an added flavor or aroma when the tobacco is smoked. These volatile substances which either directly or indirectly give added flavor to the tobacco may be conveniently termed tobacco conditioning agents. Specifically in describing this invention they may be termed adsorbed tobacco conditioning agents.

While silica hydrogel has been the only adsorbent substance so far mentioned in the description of the process of this invention, other strongly adsorbent substances may be used. For example, other siliceous substances such as kieselguhr, fullers earth, certain clays and siliceous earth, when properly activated, or carbonaceous material such as active charcoal, or aluminiferous substances such as activated bauxite and alumina hydrogel, or other strongly adsorbent substances such as properly prepared ferric oxide may be used in place of the silica hydrogel as adsorbing agents for moisture or aromatic substances. An advantage of these adsorbent materials which are used in this process is that they are tasteless and odorless, even when heated. From this standpoint, therefore, they serve as ideal carriers'of flavors, while they themselves remain physiologically inert.

In order to have the adsorbent material most effective, it is desirable that it be activated before use by the most approved method, as will be understood by those who are skilled in the use of such materials. For example, silica gel may be activated by heating to a temperature of 300 C. for two hours, whereupon it is capable of adsorbing approximately 20 per cent., by weight, of moisture.

In carrying out this process it has been found most desirable to have the silica gel finely divided, that is, of the order of size of material which will pass a standard sieve with two hundred meshes to the inch, but the invention is not limited to the use of an adsorbent material of this dimension.

No special precautions are ordinarily necessary in order to make the silica gel or other adsorbent material adhere to the tobacco, but the process may in some cases be improved by using a small amount of a physiologically inert adhesive such as a dilute solution of water glass.

I claim:

1. A substantially homogeneous mixture of tobacco and a highly activated adsorbent substance on which is adsorbeda volatile flavoring agent.

2. A substantially homogeneous mixture of tobacco and a highly activated adsorbent substance on whichis adsorbed menthol.

3. A substantially homogeneous mixture of tobacco and a highly activated siliceous hydrogel on which is adsorbed a volatile flavoring agent.

4. A substantially homogeneous mixture of tobacco and a highly activated alumina hydrogel -on which is adsorbed a volatile flavoring agent.

5. A substantially homogeneous mixture of tobacco and activated carbon on which is adsorbed a volatile flavoring agent. 7 V

6. A substantially homogeneous mixture of tobacco and activated carbon on which is'adsorbed menthol.

'7. A substantially homogeneous mixture of tobacco and a highly activated adsorbent substance on which is adsorbed moisture and an aromatic substance.

8. A substantially homogeneous mixture of tobacco and more than one highly activated adsorbent substance on which are adsorbed one or more volatile flavoring substances.

9. A cigarette containing tobacco admixed with a highly activated adsorbent substance on which is adsorbed moisture and an aromatic substance.

10. A cigarette containing tobacco admixed with one or more'highly activated adsorbent substances on whichare adsorbed more than one volatile flavoring substance.

11. A cigarette containing tobacco admixed with a highly activated alumina 'hydrogel on which is adsorbed a volatile flavoring agent.

12. A cigarette containing tobacco admixed with activated carbon on which is adsorbed men thol,

RAYMOND P. ALLEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2706695 *Jul 19, 1949Apr 19, 1955Gen Cigar CoWater-soluble cellulose derivatives in smoking products
US3011921 *Dec 19, 1957Dec 5, 1961Minerals & Chem Philipp CorpTobacco composition and smoking unit containing material for eliminating deleterious matter
US3047431 *May 8, 1961Jul 31, 1962Philip Morris IncSmoking composition
US3047432 *May 8, 1961Jul 31, 1962Philip Morris IncSmoking composition and method of imparting flavor thereto
US3106211 *Dec 17, 1959Oct 8, 1963Reynolds Metals CoTobacco product
US3112754 *Oct 30, 1961Dec 3, 1963Robert Harper JMethod of making a tobacco substtute
US3150668 *Feb 12, 1960Sep 29, 1964LassiterCigarette
US3169535 *Jan 18, 1962Feb 16, 1965LassiterCigarette
US3236244 *Sep 19, 1961Feb 22, 1966American Tobacco CoTobacco smoke filter element
US3288146 *Jul 11, 1963Nov 29, 1966Philip Morris IncComposition for incorporating flavor into tobacco smoke
US3584630 *Aug 20, 1969Jun 15, 1971Philip Morris IncTobacco product having low nicotine content associated with a release agent having nicotine weakly absorbed thereon
US3738374 *Mar 5, 1970Jun 12, 1973B LabCigar or cigarette having substitute filler
US4715388 *Jun 20, 1985Dec 29, 1987Philip Morris IncorporatedCigarettes having minimized loose ends and a process for preparing same
US4827950 *Jul 28, 1986May 9, 1989R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyMethod for modifying a substrate material for use with smoking articles and product produced thereby
US5060663 *Dec 7, 1987Oct 29, 1991Philip Morris IncorporatedProcess for minimizing loose ends in cigarettes
US5137034 *Sep 15, 1989Aug 11, 1992R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanySmoking article with improved means for delivering flavorants
US8408216Dec 22, 2004Apr 2, 2013Philip Morris Usa Inc.Flavor carrier for use in smoking articles
US20040231684 *May 20, 2003Nov 25, 2004Zawadzki Michael A.Smoking article and smoking article filter
US20060130861 *Dec 22, 2004Jun 22, 2006Philip Morris Usa Inc.Flavor carrier for use in smoking articles
EP0014105A2 *Jan 29, 1980Aug 6, 1980THE JAPAN TOBACCO & SALT PUBLIC CORPORATIONFlavourant composition for tobacco, method for its production and tobacco product containing said composition
EP0014105A3 *Jan 29, 1980Feb 25, 1981The Japan Tobacco & Salt Public CorporationFlavourant composition for tobacco, method for its production and tobacco product containing said composition
EP0069056A1 *Jun 1, 1982Jan 5, 1983Baumgartner Papiers S.A.Process to aromatise tabacco smoke, cigarette end piece to carry out the process, and use of the process
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/274
International ClassificationA24B15/28, A24B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA24B15/281
European ClassificationA24B15/28B