Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2063227 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1936
Filing dateFeb 7, 1935
Priority dateFeb 7, 1935
Publication numberUS 2063227 A, US 2063227A, US-A-2063227, US2063227 A, US2063227A
InventorsCalvin Irl B
Original AssigneeCalvin Irl B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe
US 2063227 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 8, i936.

B. CALVEN 2,063,227

SHOE

Filed Feb, 7,

2 Sheets-Sheet l @ffl zmvsmon ATTORNEY I Dec. 8, 1936 I l. B. CALVIN 2,063,227

SHOE

' Filed Feb. 7, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 %"6 I A Ale-0 Q aNvENToR My ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 8, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

error.

In B. Calvin, Akron. on. Application February '1, 1988, Serial No. 5,35:

10 claims. (01.86-12) The present invention relates to an improvement in shoes and has for its primary object to produce a shoe which is simple in construction, has practical utility, is of pleasing and attractive appearance, and is inexpensive to manufacture.

A further object of the invention is to produce a. shoe of the knock-down or fabricated type which is easily assembled by the user, thus oflering a personal incentive and materially reducing the ultimate cost to the user.

A still fm'ther object of the invention resides in providing a sole for the shoe, preferably of molded rubber, and constructed in such a manner as to reduce to a minimum the possibility of water leaking therethrough.

With the objects above indicated and other objects hereinafter explained in view; the invention consists in the construction and combination of elements hereinafter described and claimed.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a shoe embodying the present invention;

Figure 2 is a bottom planview of the shoe illustrated in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary, longitudinal, -sectional view of the toe portion of the shoe illustrated in Figure 1;

figure 4 is a transverse, sectional view taken on line 4-4 in Figure 1 showing more clearly the structural details;

Figure 5 is a side elevational view of a modified form of shoe sole embodying the present invention;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary, transverse, sectional view taken on line 66 in Figure 5 of the toe portion of the sole, but on anenlarged scale;

Figure 7 is a transverse, sectional view taken on line 1-1 in Fmure 5, but on an enlarged scale;

Figure 8 is a fragmentary, side elevational view of 'a still further modification of a shoe sole embodying the invention;

Figure 9 is. a fragmentary, transverse, sectional view taken on line. 9-8 in Figure 8 of the toe portion of the sole, but on an enlarged scale;

\ Figure 10 is a fragmentary, side elevational view of a still further modification;

Figure 11 is a transverse, sectional view taken on line Illl in Figure 10.

In the drawings I i indicates generally one type of shoe embodying the present invention wherein the upper consists ofidentical side portions l2-I2,' a continuous toe portion II and a top portion I! having an integral tongue I! at the inner end thereof. These portions are cut in any desired form and should be provided with complementary, adjacent edges to produce a complete upper such as shown in Figure l. The portions along the adjacent edges are preferably provided with spaced openings it through which lacings II are threaded in such a manner as to securely maintain the respective portions in assembled or unitary relation. The ends of the lacings II may be secured in any suitable manner such as tying as indicated at I! and the lacings may be of any desired color, preferably contrasting with the color of the leather upper portions to present a pleasing appearance.

The side portions have spaced openings I! at their upper forward ends to receive a lace of the usual type for securing the shoe upon the foot. While I have illustrated one type of upper it should be understood that many different designs may be substituted therefor.

A sole II of the usual contour is preferably molded from rubber to simulate sponge and any desirable similar material may be substituted therefor. The sole II more clearly shown in Figure 2 has a heel portion 22, shank portion 23, ball portion 24, and toe portion 25, the latter being slightly thicker to provide for additional wearing, and all being formed integral. The inner surface of the sole ii is of course smooth throughout, and an insole 26 may, if desired, be secured thereto to provide a soft and pleasant surface for the foot.

A flange 21 extends upwardly and continuous-'- ly around the outer edge .of the sole and is formed integral therewith. The outer surface may be slightly tapered as shown at II to add to the appearance of the sole and to facilitate and molding operation. The flange I] may extend upwardly any desirable height and is provided with a plurality of blind, transverse openings 2! spaced apart longitudinally around the flange. These openings 29 are more clearly" shown in Figure 6 and have normally closed inner ends 30 for a purpose to be later described.

The portions i2 and I I of the upper are provided with a plurality of transverse openings 3! adjacent the'bottom' thereof which are spaced so as to substantially register with the openings 29 in the flange 21 as more clearly shown in Figures 3 and 4. A lacing-l2 is threaded through the aligned openings ti and 28 after the lower edge of the upper is positioned inside of the flange 21 to securely maintain the sole and upper, in assembled relation. This lacing 32 may be of leather or other suitable material and preferably t eated to strengthen and renderthe same wamaterial tends to grip the lacing and thereby terproof. The openings 29 and 3] are, of course, made smaller than the cross section of the lacing 32 so that the rubber material of the flange is'stretched when the lacing is threaded through theopenings with the result that the rubber to permit the lacing to pass through. This pierced end tends to additionally grip the lacing securely so as to prevent water from passing therethrough.

Extending around the toe portion of the sole 2| are a plurality of spaced projections 33 to reinforce the same and to increase the wearing qualities. Directly above these projections is a continuous groove 34 extending substantially concurrently therewith and in which the adjacent openings 29 are positioned so that the lacing extending around the toe will be disposed in the groove where it will be protected from injury in the event the toe is stubbed.

It is intended, of course, that the shoe heretofore described embodying the invention is to be produced for distribution and sale in knockeddown or fabricated form. This is most desirable inasmuch as the greatest'expense in the manufacture of this shoe would be in the assembling and lacing. When this latter step is eliminated and is left to the user, the shoe can be manufactured and sold at a minimum of expense and at a price very appealing to the purchaser. Practically no sales resistance is met with in the sale of this shoe because of its simplicity and exceptional quality; If an upper wears out or is damaged. in any manner, a new upper may be purchased, and the same in the event the sole is worn out or damaged. Furthermore, children as well as adults get enjoyment out of assembling and lacing the shoe. Many color combinations are available which is very desirable in a sport shoe. Also lacings to match the ensemble may be employed.

While a more or less conventional shoe upper is shown, it should be understood that in place thereof the usual type of straps, etc., used in sandals, bathing slippers, etc., may be substituted, but having the-same connection to the sole except that in some instances it will not require as many holes 29 as are employed in Figure 1.

In Figures 5 to 11, inclusive, modified sole structures are illustrated but still embodying the present invention. In Figure 5 the sole 35 is similar to that shown in Figure 1, but eliminates the grooves above the projection 33. This sole is also adapted for sandals'and thelike. In Figure 8 a sole 36 of smooth appearing rubber molded in any desired form is shown and is particularly adapted for types of shoes other than sport. An ofl'set portion 31 is provided integral with the sole and of lesser thickness to give the appearance of a thin sole. The upper is connected in each instance in the manner as heretofore described. These molded rubber soles may also be made-up in many difierent colors.

In Figures loand 11, a modified sole and upper structure is shown wherein a sole 38 of molded rubber material is provided with a pair of upstanding spaced flanges 39 and 40 which may extend continuously circumferentially or be interrupted in the event the sole is used f r d l The adjacent surface of the flanges may betapered to assist in removing the mold or core. The

lower portion of an upper ii is disposed between the flanges as shown and may be secured in any suitable manner such as by cementing, lacing,

changes and modifications may be resorted to. without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a sole for shoes and the like, an upstanding, continuous flange secured to the marginal edge thereof, said flange being provided with a plurality of spaced openingsclosed at one end thereof. r

2. In a sole for shoes andthe like, an upstanding, continuous flange secured to the mar-. ginal edge thereof, 'said flange being provided with a plurality of spaced openings and-a peripheral groove adjacent one end thereof in superimposed relation with respect to the adjacent openings. I

3. In a molded rubber sole for shoes and the like, an upstanding flange united to the marginal edge thereof, said flange being provided with a plurality of spaced openings normally closed at one end thereof.

4. In a molded rubber sole for-shoes and the like, an upstanding flange united to the marginal 1 edge thereof, said flange being provided with a 1 plurality of spaced openings normally closed at ing a sole of molded rubber having an upstanding, continuous flange united to the marginal edge thereof, said flange being provided with a plurality of spaced openings closed at one end by a ruptured web, an upper portion having a plurality of spaced openings along the lower edge thereof in substantial registry with the openings in said flange, and a lacing threaded through said openings and ruptured webs to secure said upper and sole in assembled relation.

7. A shoe of the character described comprising a sole of molded rubber having 'an upstande ing, continuous flange united to-the marginal edge thereof, said flange being provided with a plurality of spaced openings and further having a peripheral groove around the toe portion in superimposed relation with respect to the adjacent edge thereof, said flange being provided with a 1 plurality of spaced openings and further having a with a plurality of spaced openings normally peripheral groove around the toe portion in suclosed at one end thereof.

perimposed relation with respect to the adjacent 10. In a sole for shoes and the like, at least openings, and a. plurality of spaced projections one upstanding flange secured to themarginal united to the outer end of the toe portion beedge thereof, said flange being provided with one neath said groove. or more spaced openings and a peripheral groove 9. In a sole for shoes and the like, a plurality in superimposed relation with respect to said 01 upstanding spaced flanges united to the maropenings.

ginal edge thereof, said flanges being provided IRL B. CALVIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2535560 *May 2, 1949Dec 26, 1950Barr Ralph IShoe with marginally-downturned sole
US2798312 *May 26, 1954Jul 9, 1957Frank A MullerPlastic shoe unit
US4194310 *Oct 30, 1978Mar 25, 1980Brs, Inc.Athletic shoe for artificial turf with molded cleats on the sides thereof
US4262435 *Apr 11, 1979Apr 21, 1981Block Barry HAthletic shoe
US8549772 *Feb 9, 2010Oct 8, 2013Roger John CRAINFootwear construction eliminating the use of a foxing or a foxing-like band
US20110192060 *Feb 9, 2010Aug 11, 2011Crain Roger JohnFootwear construction eliminating the use of a foxing or a foxing-like band
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/12, D02/944, 36/32.00R, 36/25.00R
International ClassificationA43B3/00, A43B3/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/14
European ClassificationA43B3/14